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View Full Version : NEPAL - Aubrey Sacco, 23, Langtang, 20 April 2010 - Missing on trek **ARREST**



manybooks
05-10-2010, 08:02 PM
This young lady from my hometown (coincidently Kayleah Wilson's town) is missing on a trek in Nepal. She is a talented and vivacious young woman, and although this isn't the typical "missing person" for Webslueths, I'm sure her family and friends would appreciate your thoughts and prayers.

http://www.greeleytribune.com/article/20100510/NEWS/100519963/1051&ParentProfile=1001

darlin gal
05-10-2010, 08:16 PM
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=122096637808141

AUBREY SACCO, age 23, is MISSING in NEPAL. She took a bus from Kathmandu to SYABRUBESI on April 19, and began the 7-8 day LANGTANG trek in the Himalayas on April 20. She planned to follow the Lonely Planet guide. She should have returned to Kathmandu between April 30-May 1. We have not heard from her since she began the trek. She is trekking ALONE. Nepali agencies are working on this, including the US Embassy.

darlin gal
05-10-2010, 08:19 PM
An American trekker who had come to Nepal in April for trekking in Langtang region has gone missing for over a week.

http://www.nepalnews.com/main/images/stories/frontpic/2010_may/aubrey%20sacco.jpg

Aubrey Sacco, 23, resident of Colorado, USA had set out for a trek to Langtang on April 18.

According to her parents Paul and Connie Sacco, she was scheduled to return to Shyabrubesi on April 30, but she has not contacted her parents and friends.

“Although the strikes in Nepal could have prevented her from contacting us, we are very concerned now as she is already 9 days late from her trek departure date,” her father Paul Sacco told Nepalnews over the phone. “We request all hikers, hoteliers, trekking guides and others to inform us if they spotted our daughter anywhere at this time.”

Her parents said, they received an email from Aubrey from Shyabrubesi last on April 20 and have not heard from her since. Sacco couple can be contacted at saccolaw@gmail.com

http://www.nepalnews.com/main/index.php/news-archive/19-general/5946-american-trekker-missing-in-nepal.html

manybooks
05-13-2010, 08:27 AM
Latest article from the local paper.

http://www.greeleytribune.com/article/20100513/NEWS/100519879/1051&ParentProfile=1001

and the facebook page started by her cousin. Up to date info from the family is posted here.

http://www.facebook.com/#!/group.php?gid=122096637808141

JLMcKenna83
05-13-2010, 01:19 PM
from looking at the facebook comments, it seems that there are locals who are trying to look out for her and gather information from stops along the way (how accurate they are, who really knows...) But there is also a man who is willing to use his organization to help pay for anything that Aubrey needs, a room for the night, a vehicle, and even transportation to the airport if necessary. Her father is also leaving for Nepal, and there are also other trekkers from around the world keeping an eye out for Aubrey.

Checking out different trekking boards and a couple of news article with comments, most say that Nepal is a very safe place, even for a woman alone, and the most dangerous part is actually the bus ride out! (However, it's not even that violent, they stop the buses and force "donations" and most of the time they give you a receipt for the "donation" so you don't even have to pay twice if your bus gets stopped again!) The villages along the trek routes know the value of tourism, and go out of their way to help trekkers.

I hope Aubrey is found soon!!

Cubby
05-13-2010, 06:41 PM
bumping for Aubrey. I'm so glad locals are helping search for her! Come home safely Aubrey!

nursebeeme
05-13-2010, 06:44 PM
I saw this article and am very glad the thread has been started for her. Mister nursebeeme and I are currently hosting an officer family from Nepal over the last year and have learned quite a bit about the culture.

I will talk to them and see what they have to say about the park/area/trek.

nursebeeme
05-13-2010, 07:02 PM
Ok... just talked to my friend who is from Nepal. The minute I told her the Langtang area she said, "oh I am so sorry"...

She said that it is a mountainous area and "bodies have been found there" from people hiking the area. She said it has a history of taking hikers. She also said that many of the missing (locally from Nepal) in the Langtang area "have not come back yet." When I told her that she was alone hiking my friend couldn't believe it. She said she, at the least, should have hired a local guide or went with a friend.

Just wanted to pass this boots on the ground opinion on.

PaulR
05-13-2010, 08:22 PM
I can't believe she'd go on that long a hike alone. That is asking for disaster. There's no shortage of missing persons stories that turn into tragic deaths because something happened and the hiker couldn't get help.

TravelingBug
05-13-2010, 09:08 PM
I wonder if she had something like a Spot Device (http://www.findmespot.com/en/) for tracking. I know that's what hikers use for the Pacific Crest Trail (2650 miles Mexico to Canada), Continental Divide, and Appalachian Trails, as many hike it at least largely alone, just periodically meeting up with other hikers. We relied on that tremendously when a family member was hiking the PCT - it allowed us to constantly see where that person was, and it allowed them to send a message if they needed to ("ok" or whatever with a location) OR send an urgent message that would get LE involved in case of injury or something - always with GPS coordinates.

PaulR
05-14-2010, 12:43 AM
I wonder if she had something like a Spot Device (http://www.findmespot.com/en/) for tracking. I know that's what hikers use for the Pacific Crest Trail (2650 miles Mexico to Canada), Continental Divide, and Appalachian Trails, as many hike it at least largely alone, just periodically meeting up with other hikers. We relied on that tremendously when a family member was hiking the PCT - it allowed us to constantly see where that person was, and it allowed them to send a message if they needed to ("ok" or whatever with a location) OR send an urgent message that would get LE involved in case of injury or something - always with GPS coordinates.

It looks like Spot has poor coverage for Nepal: "REDUCED OR NO COVERAGE AVAILABLE WITHIN A 20 MINUTE PERIOD."

Coverage map link:
http://www.findmespot.com/en/index.php?cid=109
http://www.findmespot.com/images/coveragemap_nolegend.jpg

TravelingBug
05-14-2010, 11:42 AM
It looks like Spot has poor coverage for Nepal: "REDUCED OR NO COVERAGE AVAILABLE WITHIN A 20 MINUTE PERIOD."

Coverage map link:
http://www.findmespot.com/en/index.php?cid=109
http://www.findmespot.com/images/coveragemap_nolegend.jpg

Sorry, I should have been more clear...

I just questioned if she was using a Spot or similar type of device.

Though I realize that there are some places where reception/coverage is limited or non-existent, as we found that as well, with our family member, having some sort of similar type device would at least give some indication as to whether she had still been making forward progress or the general area where she was last known to be in - anything a bit more specific than on region and a particular trail.

That's why I was questioning whether she might have something similar, even if it couldn't do the every few minute tracking that some devices can in their prime locations, something that gave a signal even every 6-12-24 hours or so would give a better starting point in instances where we have hikers or trekkers missing.

manybooks
05-14-2010, 10:57 PM
As I mentioned in my original post, Aubrey is a talented and amazing young lady. Here is her personal website. Absolutely amazing how touching her art and words can be, even through the distance of the internet.
Come home soon, Aubrey. http://www.aubreysacco.com/acs/home.html

manybooks
05-15-2010, 09:31 PM
from her Facebook page -

UPDATE: Aubrey did not get on her flight. The search intensifies. Thank you to all of those who are following and sending positive energy and prayer. We are starting a ribbon campaign, tie a brightly colored ribbon to a tree in your front yard. Let's brighten the world with glitter and lead Aubrey home!

Aubrey's return flight from Nepal was supposed to have been today. Some family members are leaving for Nepal tomorrow.

Cubby
05-17-2010, 11:13 AM
Greeley Man Heads To Nepal To Find Missing Daughter

DENVER -- A Colorado man whose daughter is overdue from a trek in Nepal is traveling there to try to find her.

Paul Sacco of Greeley had a flight Monday to Nepal. He and his wife haven't heard from their 23-year-old daughter, Aubrey Sacco, since April 20, when she e-mailed plans of hiking alone through Nepal's Langtang region, near the Tibetan border.

She planned to finish around April 30, but while she was in Langtang National Park, protests and strikes demanding the resignation of Nepal's prime minister shut down businesses, transportation and much of the local communication networks. She was supposed to check in after she finished the trek, but never did.

Full article a link:
http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/23577360/detail.html

Praying Aubrey is found safely.
http://tags.bluekai.com/site/1932
http://speed.pointroll.com/PointRoll/Media/banners/trans.gif?PRAd=1312689&PRCID=1312689&PRplcmt=929640&PRPID=929640

manybooks
05-18-2010, 01:21 AM
Aubrey is front page on CNN right now.

Colorado man goes to Nepal to seek missing daughter
http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/05/17/colorado.missing.hiker.nepal/index.html?hpt=C1

human
05-18-2010, 10:43 PM
Let's hope that she is sick and staying at someone's home.

In the book Three Cups of Tea, the author got lost and sick and ended up being taken care of some villagers in a remote part of Pakistan.

I am hoping.

kwatmac
05-20-2010, 05:09 PM
Dad of missing Nepal hiker finds daughter's laptop...

http://www.9news.com/news/article.aspx?storyid=139362&catid=339

Search in Nepal Heats Up for Missing US Hiker...

http://www.aolnews.com/world/article/search-in-nepal-heats-up-for-missing-us-hiker-aubrey-sacco/19485069

nursebeeme
05-20-2010, 07:34 PM
http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/23623999/detail.html

more about the missing laptop and journal... this is very strange...

if she continued to trek on from that point she would have taken her things

I wonder if this hotel was at the start, middle, or end of the trek? Would be nice to know the location

nursebeeme
05-20-2010, 07:36 PM
http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/23623999/detail.html

more about the missing laptop and journal... this is very strange...

if she continued to trek on from that point she would have taken her things

I wonder if this hotel was at the start, middle, or end of the trek? Would be nice to know the location


Paul did GO to the hotel where Aubrey had her things in storage. We new that they were there, she could NOT take them on the trek with her.She had to rent a back pack. So Paul went to pick them up!! He did NOT find them as the stated in some of the news reports.
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=122096637808141&v=wall&ref=mf

eta: so this was most likely the hotel at the start of the trek

manybooks
05-21-2010, 08:13 AM
Mother holds out hope for daughter missing in Nepal

http://www.greeleytribune.com/article/20100521/NEWS/100529945/1051&ParentProfile=1001

PoppyH
05-23-2010, 09:55 AM
Mother holds out hope for daughter missing in Nepal

http://www.greeleytribune.com/article/20100521/NEWS/100529945/1051&ParentProfile=1001

Theres a little update at OPs link, looking for a man that Aubrey met FWIW

This gal was on my mind as she is same age as my youngest daughter, i hope they find her safe

PoppyH
05-24-2010, 07:57 AM
Bump! Praying for Aubreys safe return

manybooks
05-27-2010, 12:41 AM
http://networkedblogs.com/4f5kh

An interesting article about the Search and Rescue process underway for Aubrey. Also, an interview with her mother will be on the Today show tomorrow morning.

Truthful Lies
06-09-2010, 04:56 PM
Bumping for Aubrey...

Cubby
06-26-2010, 11:41 PM
GREELEY - The FBI is now involved in the search for a Greeley woman who disappeared in Nepal two months ago, according to the family of the missing woman.

"It's moved from a search and rescue to a criminal investigation," Paul Sacco said.
Sacco's daughter, 23-year-old Aubrey Sacco, went missing while on a trek through the Asian country of Nepal. She had been hiking alone on a remote trail.
The Saccos organized a search from their Greeley home, but that search produced few results.
"There isn't a trace of evidence as to what happened," Sacco said.

full article at link:

http://www.9news.com/news/article.aspx?storyid=141817&catid=339

Cubby
06-26-2010, 11:43 PM
Another article.

http://www.coloradodaily.com/cu-boulder/ci_15378852#axzz0s1OC4tFS

I was so hoping her parents had some answers by now.

Snoopster
06-27-2010, 12:00 AM
Missing CU-Boulder grad in Nepal now considered criminal case

http://www.coloradodaily.com/cu-boulder/ci_15378852#axzz0s1GUxjB5



Paul Sacco said the FBI has informed him that the bureau, along with the Nepal Police and the Nepalese Army, are treating the case of the missing 23-year-old as a criminal matter.

Aubrey's father was in Nepal for a month searching for her, to no avail.

manybooks
06-29-2010, 11:50 AM
More articles - links on the Facebook Page (please join!)
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=122096637808141

And the article in the local paper today
http://www.greeleytribune.com/article/20100629/NEWS/100629677/1051&ParentProfile=1001

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
06-29-2010, 03:21 PM
Missing US girl's travel partner in Thailand

It has been more than two months but the whereabouts of a missing American trekker, Aubrey Caroline Sacco, are still unknown.

[snip]

The authorities now suspect involvement of a criminal group and are treating the case as a criminal matter.

According to highly placed sources, the US Embassy has located Aubreys travel partner Steve Miller in Thailand. Aubrey, along with Miller, had entered Nepal via Darjeeling. Sources claim that Miller had not checked into Langtang Park. Miller had accompanied her till they reached Hotel Elite, add the sources.

The search team had found her laptop, journals, a guitar and a few more items from the hotel.

Nepali Police admitted that it failed to figure out what might have happened to her. But it said it would investigate from scratch from a new angle.

More: http://www.thehimalayantimes.com/fullNews.php?headline=Missing+US+girl%27s+travel+p artner+in+Thailand&NewsID=248193&a=3

PoppyH
06-30-2010, 10:11 AM
http://www.aolnews.com/nation/article/fbi-joins-search-effort-for-aubrey-sacco-us-hiker-missing-in-nepal/19536096?flv=1&sms_ss=email


Some new info there, COme home safe Aubrey!

Cubby
07-28-2010, 10:39 PM
The Saccos want to expand their search and hire more searchers, translators, and helicopters as well as offering a reward. That takes money.

To help, friends and family have organized a fund-raiser event at the Moose Lodge, 8601 W. Fullerton in River Grove from noon to 6 p.m. July 31.

long article with details regarding the case at link.

http://www.pioneerlocal.com/elmwoodpark/news/2514582,franklin-park-aubrey-072210-s1.article

Poobah90
07-28-2010, 11:41 PM
Thanks Cubby!

Walker
08-01-2010, 09:22 PM
According to highly placed sources, the US Embassy has located Aubreys travel partner Steve Miller in Thailand. Aubrey, along with Miller, had entered Nepal via Darjeeling. Sources claim that Miller had not checked into Langtang Park. Miller had accompanied her till they reached Hotel Elite, add the sources.

Was the travel partner her boyfriend?

Cubby
08-18-2010, 03:21 AM
Benefit helps search....

a little info on the benefit held to raise funds to search for Aubrey.
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/elmwoodpark/news/2560960,elmwood-park-sacco-080510-s1.article

Still praying Aubrey's family and loved ones find answers.

fhc
10-22-2010, 06:49 PM
http://www.myfoxdc.com/dpp/news/family-asks-for-help-from-secretary-of-state-to-help-in-search-for-missing-woman-102210

Family Asks For Help From Secretary of State To Help in Search For Missing Woman

fears she has been kidnapped by human traffickers.

http://www.aubreysacco.com/acs/home.html

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
11-12-2010, 11:31 PM
Could fear be hindering search for missing hiker?

Aubrey Sacco was living up to her motto, "glitter the world," on her five-month post-college trip through South Asia before she disappeared in Nepal last spring, her family says.

The 23-year-old artist and musician from Colorado started her trip in December, teaching yoga to vacationers in Sri Lanka. Later, she went to India, studying yoga and volunteering to help schoolchildren with art and music.

[snip]

Sacco vanished in April during a hike along Nepal's sylvan and rocky Langtang trek. Some volunteers who've helped look for her say they've heard a disturbing refrain from villagers: Even if they or others in the area did know what caused her disappearance, they wouldn't reveal it.

[snip]

Although many factors -- such as the area's remoteness and difficult terrain -- have made clues to Sacco's fate hard to come by, the villagers' fear of Nepali authorities may be a significant obstacle in the hunt for the truth, some of the searchers say.

MUCH MUCH MUCH more: http://edition.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/11/03/aubrey.sacco.nepal/

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
11-12-2010, 11:33 PM
Reward Money Upped For U.S. Hiker Missing In Nepal


After a tireless but so far futile effort, the family of missing U.S. hiker Aubrey Sacco has upped the reward money for information leading to the whereabouts of the 23-year-old woman to $14,000.

[snip]


"We don't care who is responsible for her disappearance, we just want Aubrey back. We believe that someone knows exactly what happened," Connie Sacco was quoting as saying by the Himalayan Times. Nepali police and army and as well member of the U.S. embassy and three private firms conducted a joint search.

In the last three weeks we have been busy conducting a new 15-man search of primitive villages in Nepal, and distributing posters to thousands of people through a group of benevolent doctors from Colorado who are treating thousands of Langtang locals," her parents wrote on their daughter's website on Oct.21.

Read more: http://www.allheadlinenews.com/articles/7020514161?Reward%20Money%20Upped%20For%20U.S.%20H iker%20Missing%20In%20Nepal#ixzz158715gdY

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
11-14-2010, 11:36 PM
Raising money, hope for Aubrey Sacco, CU-Boulder grad missing in Nepal


University of Colorado graduate Aubrey Sacco's disappearance in Nepal in late April hit home with Laura Cornish, a Boulder stylist who loves to travel and recently spent time in Nepal.


Cornish never met 23-year-old Sacco or her family, but as the search continued, she wanted to help. So Cornish organized a fundraiser on Sunday for the family's search efforts at Boulder's Tapestry Salon and Day Spa.

Read more: http://www.dailycamera.com/news/ci_16613131#ixzz15JodEob5

manybooks
01-20-2011, 11:51 PM
Bumping this post for Aubrey. Yesterday was her 24th birthday.

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
02-13-2011, 01:48 AM
Holding out hope for daughter missing in Nepal

It's been nearly 10 months since Greeley resident 24-year-old Aubrey Sacco disappeared while hiking in Nepal, but her parents and thousands of supporters from around the world still haven't given up hope that she'll make it home someday.

More: http://www.9news.com/news/article.aspx?storyid=181093&catid=339

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
04-24-2011, 02:30 AM
Whereabouts of missing US woman still in dark

The whereabouts of Aubrey Sacco, an American woman, is still unknown exactly one year after she went missing while hiking to the Langtang National Park area in Nepal.

More: http://www.thehimalayantimes.com/fullNews.php?headline=Whereabouts+of+missing+US+wo man+still+in+dark&NewsID=284916

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
04-24-2011, 02:31 AM
After one year, missing American's whereabouts still unknown


The whereabouts of missing American Aubrey Sacco are still unknown after she went missing one year ago Friday while hiking in Nepal.


Read more: http://www.allheadlinenews.com/articles/90045788?After%20one%20year%2C%20missing%20America n%27s%20whereabouts%20still%20unknown#ixzz1KQ4xqjZ T

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
05-29-2011, 08:51 PM
Search for missing US hiker to continue in Nepal

The family of Aubrey Sacco, who disappeared from Rasuwa in Nepal last year, said that it will not abandon the search for the missing girl.

[snip]

Aubreys father Paul Sacco, an attorney and municipal court judge in Fort Lupton, accused the government of Nepal of sweeping all the efforts under the rug, not doing enough to help families to find their missing daughter in Nepal. We havent given up hope of finding our daughter, we will find her, he said, I had a dream last week. Aubrey was in a room sitting at a table and I stumbled upon her. She said to me "Daddy I'm not lost, I'm right here".

[snip]

The one year mark was like a punch in the chest, but we recovered and are moving forward with conviction. Although there is a lot of frustration, there is just no feeling of dread at our house and there has been no credible bad news. The journey to find Aubrey, however, is long and arduous. It takes time to connect to the right people (sometimes months) and a lot of time to follow clues and interview people.

More: http://www.thehimalayantimes.com/fullNews.php?headline=Search+for+missing+US+hiker+ to+continue+in+Nepal&NewsID=288862

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
08-14-2011, 04:12 PM
Aubrey Sacco, Missing US Trekker In Nepal, Target Of Another Search

The father of a 23-year-old American woman who went missing more than a year ago while hiking alone in Nepal says he is organizing a new investigation into her disappearance because he believes she is alive and is being held against her will.

More: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/08/12/aubrey-sacco-missing-nepal-hiker_n_925225.html

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
08-28-2011, 04:48 PM
Greeley parents return from Nepal with hope for missing daughter

Connie Sacco sprinkled glitter from Aubrey’s room on the mud and rocks and trees in Nepal. It was silly, she admitted to herself, but as she braved mud slides and a monsoon and walked the Langtang National Park, she wished against the reality that her daughter was missing for more than a year.

“I was just thinking to myself, ‘Here’s the path home Aubrey,’ ” she said. “Find us.”

But when Paul and Connie Sacco of Greeley talk about their recent trip to Nepal — they returned late Tuesday after a 50-hour trip — they speak of hope and a continued resolve to find their daughter, who disappeared while trekking in that national park a year-and-a-half ago.

More: http://www.greeleytribune.com/article/20110818/NEWS/708189989/1002&parentprofile=1001

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
09-25-2011, 11:15 PM
Sacco hopeful as search for sister continues

In the days before the San Diego State mens soccer team started readying for the season with drills and corner kicks, midfielder Morgan Sacco was 8,000 miles away in Nepal, hiking through terrain marked by landslides, leeches and snakes.

He was searching for his sister Aubrey, a 2009 University of Colorado graduate, world traveler and yoga instructor who disappeared in April 2010, while trekking alone in the Himalayas.

The family still has no answers, despite an earlier trip by Saccos father and older brother to search for her, as well as the involvement of the U.S. Embassy in Kathmandu, the FBI and the Nepali army and police.

More: http://tucsoncitizen.com/usa-today-news/2011/09/20/sacco-hopeful-as-search-for-sister-continues/

Jmoose
09-27-2011, 02:14 PM
I wonder why there doesn't seem to be much interest in this case on the part of the US Government? While I guess it's possible (and maybe even likely) that she is no longer with us, there is no evidence that that is the case, and the parents seem to believe that she is still alive. The family's last update from August simply detailed their wretched journey over there as they search for her. There seemed to be so much in the news about the 2 young men recently released from Iran-I wish there was more attention to this girl's disappearance.

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
10-16-2011, 04:33 PM
Searching for the 'Glitter Girl'

Aubrey Sacco, an accomplished athlete, scholar, musician and artist, is the brightest star in her family's universe.

"Aubrey lights up a room when she enters it," said her younger brother, Morgan Sacco. "She's an effervescent person, full of life, and she totally loves glitter -- it reflects her personality."

But a year and a half ago, the "Glitter Girl," as her family and friends call her, mysteriously disappeared.

More: http://espn.go.com/espnw/college-sports/7054229/searching-glitter-girl-aubrey-sacco


http://a.espncdn.com/combiner/i?img=/photo/2011/1003/espnw_sacco_300.jpg&w=300
Courtesy of the Sacco family
Aubrey taught yoga, studied meditation and volunteered to teach children before disappearing in Nepal.

Walker
10-17-2011, 01:32 AM
Searching for the 'Glitter Girl'

Aubrey Sacco, an accomplished athlete, scholar, musician and artist, is the brightest star in her family's universe.

"Aubrey lights up a room when she enters it," said her younger brother, Morgan Sacco. "She's an effervescent person, full of life, and she totally loves glitter -- it reflects her personality."

But a year and a half ago, the "Glitter Girl," as her family and friends call her, mysteriously disappeared.

More: http://espn.go.com/espnw/college-sports/7054229/searching-glitter-girl-aubrey-sacco


http://a.espncdn.com/combiner/i?img=/photo/2011/1003/espnw_sacco_300.jpg&w=300
Courtesy of the Sacco family
Aubrey taught yoga, studied meditation and volunteered to teach children before disappearing in Nepal.


From the same link:

There aren't many clues. A picture of an unidentified man in Aubrey's camera, taken shortly before her disappearance, could provide some answers -- if her family ever discovers who he is.

And there's a woman, Danielle Fouche, a French citizen in her early 60s, who trekked the Langtang trail in Nepal at the same time as Aubrey.

"It's very possible [Fouche] saw Aubrey on the trail," Connie Sacco said. "We contacted the French government to ask if they could locate her for us but got no cooperation. It's been one of many frustrations in our search."

Where did they find the camera, at the hotel or somewhere on the trail?

Maybe the Frenchwoman is missing also.

EdinburghLass
10-17-2011, 04:27 AM
I'm sure this has been checked out but there is a Danielle Fouche on this site - she looks to fit the age range.

http://giverny.org/hotels/fouche/

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
11-30-2011, 02:54 AM
Photo from CU-Boulder grad Aubrey Sacco's laptop shows 'person of interest'

A photograph of a man who may have more information on the whereabouts of a missing University of Colorado graduate is making rounds on the Internet.

The photo, taken at a caf in Darjeeling, India, shows a white man wearing a powder-blue collared shirt sitting at a table with a Pepsi bottle in front of him.

Paul Sacco said he found the image on his daughter Aubrey's laptop in May 2010, a few weeks after she vanished in Nepal.

"I want to emphasize that this guy is not a suspect. We just know that she took the photo of him, so why wouldn't he surface? Why wouldn't he say something?" he said. "He's a person of interest just because we don't know who he is."

More: http://www.dailycamera.com/cu-news/ci_19436188?source=most_viewed


http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site21/2011/1129/20111129_113045_saccocase_500.jpg (http://www.dailycamera.com/portlet/article/html/imageDisplay.jsp?contentItemRelationshipId=4104510 )
Person of interest in Aubrey Sacco's disappearance (Courtesy photo)

Walker
11-30-2011, 11:49 PM
[SIZE=2]Photo from CU-Boulder grad Aubrey Sacco's laptop shows 'person of interest'


Thank you for posting. My guess about the photo had been that it showed some horrible creature chasing AS with a knife. This photo seems more innocuous. The man in the photo may not know that AS is missing. Say he lives in some Indian city, and doesn't follow the news too much.

Lindsaym
12-01-2011, 12:10 AM
Walker - Varanasi, Mussoori, Darjeeling, Dehra Dun, Rishikesh -- and then, south (Goa) and WAY south (Pondicherry): these are the places I can see a white guy without much money and regular internet access settling in and making a life in India.

ANY hill town in Himachal Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Jammu and Kashmir, and UP... even the remote areas of Bihar (where Buddhist wannabes like to hang out)... if we can distribute this guy's photo and get the folks in the post offices and internet cafes there to post it, we would be in good stead.

I am out of India right now but I can certainly copy and paste the photo in emails to friends who travel the hippie/yoga/druggie/mountaineering/spiritual paths (and please keep in mind, they are all QUITE different paths in India -- mountaineers don't hang out with yoginis don't hang out with druggies don't hang out with hippies etc. but they all seem to converge at the random restaurants where ginger-lemon-honey hot drinks are served!).

TBH I've never been to Nepal and I imagine any number of bad ends could come to somebody hiking mountain trails. But to find this guy would be a little peace of mind for the Saccos so let's make it happen!

Walker
12-01-2011, 03:41 AM
Walker - Varanasi, Mussoori, Darjeeling, Dehra Dun, Rishikesh -- and then, south (Goa) and WAY south (Pondicherry): these are the places I can see a white guy without much money and regular internet access settling in and making a life in India.

ANY hill town in Himachal Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Jammu and Kashmir, and UP... even the remote areas of Bihar (where Buddhist wannabes like to hang out)... if we can distribute this guy's photo and get the folks in the post offices and internet cafes there to post it, we would be in good stead.

I am out of India right now but I can certainly copy and paste the photo in emails to friends who travel the hippie/yoga/druggie/mountaineering/spiritual paths (and please keep in mind, they are all QUITE different paths in India -- mountaineers don't hang out with yoginis don't hang out with druggies don't hang out with hippies etc. but they all seem to converge at the random restaurants where ginger-lemon-honey hot drinks are served!).

TBH I've never been to Nepal and I imagine any number of bad ends could come to somebody hiking mountain trails. But to find this guy would be a little peace of mind for the Saccos so let's make it happen!

Somehow the guy doesn't strike me as an American.

Americans generally, esp. the backpacker type, tend to be proud of their athletic build, but this guy has his shoulders all hunched up, and arms folded across the table. His body language is not like what we would usually expect from a hiker meeting a girl compatriot in a remote foreign locale. Plus, Americans prefer name-brands in clothing.

The smile is tight, and strained: forced politeness? And, his eyes are terribly squinted up, though he not looking directly in the sunlight.

He looks as if he were highly offended by something AS had said. Or as if he were warning her about something or even threatening her. On the other hand, he might just be a reclusive individual, but the face shows no friendliness at all.

Since some Nepali ethnic groups have Indo-European roots, could a native Nepali possibly have blond hair & blue eyes?

Or is this man more likely a Russian or a Pole?

Walker
12-01-2011, 10:20 PM
Somehow the guy doesn't strike me as an American.

Americans generally, esp. the backpacker type, tend to be proud of their athletic build, but this guy has his shoulders all hunched up, and arms folded across the table. His body language is not like what we would usually expect from a hiker meeting a girl compatriot in a remote foreign locale. Plus, Americans prefer name-brands in clothing.

The smile is tight, and strained: forced politeness? And, his eyes are terribly squinted up, though he not looking directly in the sunlight.

He looks as if he were highly offended by something AS had said. Or as if he were warning her about something or even threatening her. On the other hand, he might just be a reclusive individual, but the face shows no friendliness at all.

Since some Nepali ethnic groups have Indo-European roots, could a native Nepali possibly have blond hair & blue eyes?

Or is this man more likely a Russian or a Pole?

Examining a magnified image of the photo, the man's facial expression seems less rejecting, and more expressive of sadness combined with curiousity. And, he is quite a bit older than AS. When you look very closely, he could be like 50.

And, rethinking, he could possibly be an American. Maybe he was someone who had knowledge of backpacking, and perhaps she was asking him how to plan for something not quite realistic.

belimom
12-01-2011, 11:18 PM
Through googling, I found some photos/albums/journals of other folks who were in Nepal and even Langtang at the same time as Aubrey. I've looked at the photos until I'm cross-eyed, hoping to see any trace of her in them, but no luck yet. Perhaps some more sets of eyes would help:

April 2010: Many photos but mostly of the family/group posting, not many others (these are actually acquaintances of ours - fellow cruisers, who were trekking the same area at the same time that Aubrey went missing - this is where I got the idea to search for add'l albums; I've already contacted them about Aubrey, back when she went missing; she didn't look familiar to them at all)
http://svocelot.com/Landfalls/Newsletters/Nepal/1Langtang.htm

Apr 4 - Apr 28, 2010: Beautiful photos but more artistic in nature - not many tourists:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/andreasmarkou/sets/72157623992767692/

Apr 16 - Apr 22, 2010: A few more tourists:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/oeyvind/sets/72157623935637740/

Apr 2010: Another trip through Nepal and Lantang
http://maximumadventure.net/2011/07/23/langtang-valley-nepal-in-april-2010-part-1-kathmandu-to-kyanjing-gompa/

Mar/Apr 2010: Nepal trip
http://www.flickr.com/photos/clovely/sets/72157623901555218/with/4539638481/

Janeumayer
12-02-2011, 12:36 AM
Examining a magnified image of the photo, the man's facial expression seems less rejecting, and more expressive of sadness combined with curiousity. And, he is quite a bit older than AS. When you look very closely, he could be like 50.

And, rethinking, he could possibly be an American. Maybe he was someone who had knowledge of backpacking, and perhaps she was asking him how to plan for something not quite realistic.

He looks just like my brother in law, and he is 36! He started getting gray years ago. BY the way he dresses he seems european to me. Maybe german or swedish. But you can find a lot of "cool" americans that dress in that type of shirt nowadays. So who knows? But I am pretty sure he could be in his thirties.

Janeumayer
12-02-2011, 12:37 AM
Through googling, I found some photos/albums/journals of other folks who were in Nepal and even Langtang at the same time as Aubrey. I've looked at the photos until I'm cross-eyed, hoping to see any trace of her in them, but no luck yet. Perhaps some more sets of eyes would help:

April 2010: Many photos but mostly of the family/group posting, not many others (these are actually acquaintances of ours - fellow cruisers, who were trekking the same area at the same time that Aubrey went missing - this is where I got the idea to search for add'l albums; I've already contacted them about Aubrey, back when she went missing; she didn't look familiar to them at all)
http://svocelot.com/Landfalls/Newsletters/Nepal/1Langtang.htm

Apr 4 - Apr 28, 2010: Beautiful photos but more artistic in nature - not many tourists:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/andreasmarkou/sets/72157623992767692/

Apr 16 - Apr 22, 2010: A few more tourists:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/oeyvind/sets/72157623935637740/

Apr 2010: Another trip through Nepal and Lantang
http://maximumadventure.net/2011/07/23/langtang-valley-nepal-in-april-2010-part-1-kathmandu-to-kyanjing-gompa/

Mar/Apr 2010: Nepal trip
http://www.flickr.com/photos/clovely/sets/72157623901555218/with/4539638481/

LOL I was doing the same last night, but I was looking for the guy.

MLE
12-02-2011, 12:44 PM
I agree that he doesn't have an American or Canadian "look." My guess is European, South African, or maybe even Australian.

As far as his clothing goes, there could be a variety of reasons for why he's wearing that type of clothing. The most likely is that he's been in Asia for a while and has been purchasing very affordable, locally made clothing. He could be from a wealthy family and doesn't have the insecurities that make some people have a psychological need to wear name brand logos. Most wealthy people I know certainly do not look or dress the part. Perhaps he feels like name brand logos would bring all of the gold digging women, hustling pimps, persistent beggars, pickpockets, pushy salespeople or some other characters that can be persistently annoying in poorer countries. And he may want to wear clothing that doesn't identify his nationality so he won't get hassled by people over political issues.

My guess about his body language and facial expression is that he's a shy person and doesn't enjoy being photographed. He looks shy, but polite.

Lindsaym
12-02-2011, 07:43 PM
There's no reason to assume that this guy was ever IN Nepal. According to the caption, the photo was taken in Darjeeling -- Darjeeling is a hill town in the northeast of India. It's part of a circuit frequented by expats and tourists that might (thinking of the rail itineraries here) reasonably include Varanasi, Bodh Gaya, Calcutta...

I agree that he doesn't strike me as American -- more European in look. I say that largely because he's slim and his clothing accentuates his slimness (ie is form-fitting) in a way that most North American guys' clothing is not. Moreover, his clothing looks like he bought it at a local bazaar -- it looks like the product of a local tailor -- which marks him as either a low-budget expat or a low-budget long-term traveler, IMO.

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
02-05-2012, 10:17 PM
Nepali parks marked by missing visitors

After two months of trekking through Nepals wintry valleys and hills, a young American hiked alone along a path before ending her journey.

But as she stopped to rest near two stupas, or Buddhist temples, in Langtang National Park two days before Christmas, Lena Sessions, 23, spotted a local man wearing a black dust mask.

Either I (sexually assault) you or I kill you, she said the man told her. He then came at her with a curved 1-foot knife, or the traditional khukuri used by local tribes.

Sessions escaped and made her way to the U.S. Embassy in Katmandu, where she learned she was not the first to encounter problems on that trail while hiking alone.

The U.S. Embassy has issued a warning against hiking alone in Nepal, stating that two American women were attacked and seriously injured in 2010 while hiking alone on popular trails.

More: http://tucsoncitizen.com/usa-today-news/2012/01/24/nepali-parks-marked-by-missing-visitors/



Solo hiking by women discouraged in Nepal

http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2012/01/25/Solo-hiking-by-women-discouraged-in-Nepal/UPI-95941327538501/

Kat
03-08-2012, 10:05 PM
http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_20097257

Posted: 03/04/2012 01:00:00 AM MST
March 4, 2012 8:52 PM GMT Updated: 03/04/2012 01:52:19 PM MST

Mention of Aubrey in article above.

GrainneDhu
03-09-2012, 11:21 AM
The Sacco family may have more luck by contacting an ex-pat who has lived in Nepal in the long term, so can "bridge" the two cultures. Someone who was clearly not a government type, who automatically raises suspicion in the area.

One (rather famous) such person would be Alan Burgess, the Himalayan climber who has spent 14 years living in Nepal. He's also got experience leading trekking groups through the Langtang area. While he is now (apparently) living in the Salt Lake City area, he continues his Himalayan ventures each year. I don't know him personally but have been following his exploits for years, along with his twin Adrian Burgess.

Alan Burgess has credibility with the Sherpa and other Nepalese. Asking him to poke around a bit on his next expeditions surely could not hurt and may help.

Sadly, the Himalayas have a long history of disappearing people. The terrain alone is very tough and even people with extensive experience hiking in the US can easily get in trouble trekking in Nepal.

Walker
04-24-2012, 09:07 PM
Seems to me that dogs should have located AS if she came to harm on the trail.

By the way, Lama Hotel, the location AS was last determined to have visited, is at about 7,200 ft, high enough to cause altitude sickness.

"Lama Hotel" is the name of the entire small village. And, the "hotel" itself is a rustic accommodation, more like what we might call a hostel. Langtang hotels & teahouses provide decent and inexpensive lodgings and food to the mostly Western hikers.

Despite the high elevation, Lama Hotel is still below tree line; and not situated upon barren rocky terrain, which might thwart dogs.

On the other hand, could the elevation itself impair the effectiveness of searching dogs?

http://www.vigilantpress.com/family-of-missing-girl-in-nepal-offers-reward/2086.html

Quote from above link:


On May 19, [2010] Paul Saco and his son along with a Nepali family friend who resides in Colorado arrived in Nepal to help coordinate efforts on searching. Through discussions with the witnesses and invetigation reports, the Sacco fmily learned that:

Aubrey left a Kathmandu hotel on April 20 and took a bus to Langtang National Park. She left the belongings that she wouldnt be hiking with like luggage and a computer at that hotel and never came back for them.

Aubrey started her trek on April 21 and stayed the night at a hotel in the park. There, she spoke with a trekking guide, and they talked about opportunities for her to volunteer with schoolchildren in Kathmandu after she finished the hike, according to her mother, Connie Sacco, who is following events from Colorado.

The guide says he saw Aubrey continue her hike on April 22. That day, a different hotel farther along the trek has a record of her having tea her last known location, according to Paul Sacco.

Walker
04-26-2012, 02:15 PM
In the following investigation, search & rescue dogs were tested at high altitude. While their performance was impaired, they could still function at 4800 m (or about 16,000 ft.)

http://jn.nutrition.org/content/128/12/2694S.full


Since AS was last seen at Lama Hotel (7,200 ft), dogs could probably have been effective at finding her scent.

necco
04-26-2012, 03:59 PM
In the following investigation, search & rescue dogs were tested at high altitude. While their performance was impaired, they could still function at 4800 m (or about 16,000 ft.)

http://jn.nutrition.org/content/128/12/2694S.full


Since AS was last seen at Lama Hotel (7,200 ft), dogs could probably have been effective at finding her scent.

Like people, they'd probably need more hydration and more rest at high elevations.

Walker
04-26-2012, 04:40 PM
Like people, they'd probably need more hydration and more rest at high elevations.

That's true. Dogs get altitude sickness just like people. According to the article, the time they need to find their targets is slower at elevation of 12K ft than at sea level.

Therefore, at elevation 7K ft, the dogs should have been able to find the scent, although some of the dogs may have been performing more slowly than they would at lower elevations.

No Stone Unturned
04-26-2012, 06:12 PM
Finding Aubrey - YouTube

Video on Youtube posted this week by a group doing a benefit for Aubrey in May. It includes Aubrey's mother.

Walker
06-13-2012, 11:12 PM
Belgium Debbie Maveau missing from Dhunche:

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/thread.jspa?threadID=2211685

Walker
06-14-2012, 12:44 PM
Belgium Debbie Maveau missing from Dhunche:

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/thread.jspa?threadID=2211685

Found dead. Cause undetermined at this point.

http://www.thehimalayantimes.com/fullNews.php?headline=Missing+Belgian+woman+found+ dead+in+Dhunchhe+&NewsID=336009

Lots of similarities. AS's journal reveals that she tried very hard not to "worry," but those thoughts she was pushing out of her mind may have been the voice of her own intuition telling her that she was in a dangerous situation.

Aubrey's first post December 18, 2009 to her "Glitter the World" blog: http://blogs.bootsnall.com/aubrey/aybowan.html


Protected: Ayubowan!

Ayubowan! This is the Sinhalese greeting for we wish you a long life!

After a 23 hour plane ride (which I wont bore you with the details of) I was greeted by a nice man with kind eyes, wearing a white top and white sarong holding the Aman Resortssign. I was kindly escorted to the car which would take me down the one road on the West side of Sri Lanka, to meet the spa Manager, Natalie.

Worrying: robbing us of the present moment

I had felt a little numb up to this point because I was trying not to have any expectations or worries about my trip. But now, as I drove 3 hours to Fort Galle, an old Colonial town in which one of the Aman resorts, Amangalla, was located, I was feeling a little unsure. I wasnt at all bothered by the large population of people or poverty, Im used to it [Note: Actually, she was not used to seeing true poverty at all. ] and have seen it often while traveling, but in my car I was simply an observer. I started to create small worries in my head such as, who will I talk to or what will I do all day? These were exactly the thoughts I was avoiding having before my trip. This happens when you are not fully present and in the moment, your mind starts to wander, creating endless stories. Worrying comes from thinking of the future. I was imagining myself on the street with these people, trying to think of what I would do all day with my time. Truth was though, I wouldnt even be on these road sides, I wouldnt even be with these people, and all of my small worries were a waste of my precious time. I quickly snapped out of it. Realizing that I had my first opportunity for some Sri Lankan cultural immersion, I chatted up my driver. Rahn, is his name.

Apparently she had never heard of Gavin de Becker.

DutchSleuth
06-23-2012, 07:13 AM
Belgium Debbie Maveau missing from Dhunche:

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/thread.jspa?threadID=2211685

It has been determined now that she died from violence, and some of her belongings are missing

http://www.hln.be/hln/nl/1901/reisnieuws/article/detail/1458805/2012/06/23/Belgische-Debbie-Maveau-stierf-in-Nepal-door-geweld.dhtml

Walker
06-23-2012, 12:55 PM
It has been determined now that she died from violence, and some of her belongings are missing

http://www.hln.be/hln/nl/1901/reisnieuws/article/detail/1458805/2012/06/23/Belgische-Debbie-Maveau-stierf-in-Nepal-door-geweld.dhtml

Thank you for posting that link.

A rough translation:


The 23-year-old woman from Desselgem who in a national park in Nepal death was recovered, is killed by violence. That confirms the Federal Public Prosecutor's Office. Is there a possible letters rogatory sent to Nepal.

The body of Debbie showed injuries that are not caused by Maveau wild animals or a trap. Moreover, not all her personal belongings were found. The body of the young woman has not yet been released because there is further research is needed to determine the exact cause of death. The Federal Public Prosecutor's Office finds it still too early to speak about a murder or robbery murder.

The examining magistrate in Kortrijk has ordered additional tests to determine the exact cause of death.


On the Aubrey Sacco facebook page, a poster stated that DM's camera had been found, but its memory card had been removed. DM had been decapitated, and her body was described as "mutilated."

Walker
06-26-2012, 10:49 AM
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/06/26/decapitated-belgian-trekker-found-in-nepal/


Her head was around 13 inches from the rest of her body, local inspector Bhakta Sunuwar told AFP, adding police had no leads on the culprit and were trying to establish if she had been killed by someone she met before the trek.


Sunuwar said robbery and rape were unlikely motives since her underwear had not been removed and her camera and 8,000 rupees ($93) in cash were not taken.

People are not cooperating with the investigation. Everyone in the area says they have not seen her, he added.

We found that she had travelled to Dhunche from Kathmandu by bus but none of the drivers in the area confirmed that they had seen her.

Walker
07-01-2012, 11:38 PM
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2167259/British-backpacker-vanishes-Nepal-sparking-fears-trekkers-targeted-days-Belgian-decapitated.html#ixzz1zQr8zUZN


British backpacker vanishes in Nepal sparking fears trekkers are being targeted days after Belgian was found decapitated

Zisimos Souflas, 27, vanished after setting off on a hike
Family reported him missing when he failed to return to England
Backpacker may have been murdered, police admit
Footpaths in the area are well-marked and the weather was good when he vanished
Mystery disappearance has come to light days after Belgian hiker Debbie Mavea, 23, was found decapitated

At this point, investigators still believe that he most likely is the victim of an accident.

tarabull
07-01-2012, 11:53 PM
FEARS FOR NEPAL BACKPACKER
July 2, 2012

snipped...There have been at least a dozen unsolved missing cases in Nepal in the past decade.

http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/330172/Fears-for-Nepal-backpacker

GrainneDhu
07-02-2012, 01:46 AM
Found dead. Cause undetermined at this point.

http://www.thehimalayantimes.com/fullNews.php?headline=Missing+Belgian+woman+found+ dead+in+Dhunchhe+&NewsID=336009

Lots of similarities. AS's journal reveals that she tried very hard not to "worry," but those thoughts she was pushing out of her mind may have been the voice of her own intuition telling her that she was in a dangerous situation.

Aubrey's first post December 18, 2009 to her "Glitter the World" blog: http://blogs.bootsnall.com/aubrey/aybowan.html

Apparently she had never heard of Gavin de Becker.

I disagree. If her worries were as cited (who to talk to and what to do, etc), then that doesn't sound like intuition to me, that sounds like social anxiety. Which, in turn, leads me to think she may have been in over her head.

If she was having a lot of social anxiety, that may have de-sensitised her to true intuition of danger.

Jon Krakauer talks about this in his book Into Thin Air when he mentions experienced climbers who have avoided disaster when their inner voice told them not to go for the summit on a particular day, even though conditions seemed right. He noted that his own inner voice was never of any use because it always screamed "we're all gonna diiiieeeeeee!!!"

If Aubrey was used to experiencing such worries (as she implies by saying she was having such thoughts before she left), then she may have been so used to it that when she did meet danger, she didn't recognise the difference.

tarabull
07-02-2012, 11:25 AM
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2167259/British-backpacker-vanishes-Nepal-sparking-fears-trekkers-targeted-days-Belgian-decapitated.html#ixzz1zQr8zUZN



At this point, investigators still believe that he most likely is the victim of an accident.

snipped from the link:

The graduate is just the latest young tourist to go missing in Nepal.

University of Colorado student Aubrey Caroline Sacco disappeared in the Himalayan mountains two years ago but has never been found.

Gareth Koch, 24, vanished in 2004 while Julian Wynne, 33, failed to return from a hiking trip four years ago.

Alex Ratnasothy, 24, was never found after a robbery as he was on his way to the town of Namche Bazaar in 2003.

Lena Sessions, 23, an American, was hiking alone in Langtang in December when a knife-wielding man threatened to rape and kill her but she was able to escape.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office have warned trekkers not to set off alone in Nepal.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2167259/British-backpacker-vanishes-Nepal-sparking-fears-trekkers-targeted-days-Belgian-decapitated.html#ixzz1zTkzaBfz

__________________________________

So why do people continue to trek alone??????????

:banghead:

tarabull
07-02-2012, 11:34 AM
Missing US girl's travel partner in Thailand

It has been more than two months but the whereabouts of a missing American trekker, Aubrey Caroline Sacco, are still unknown.

[snip]

The authorities now suspect involvement of a criminal group and are treating the case as a criminal matter.

According to highly placed sources, the US Embassy has located Aubreys travel partner Steve Miller in Thailand. Aubrey, along with Miller, had entered Nepal via Darjeeling. Sources claim that Miller had not checked into Langtang Park. Miller had accompanied her till they reached Hotel Elite, add the sources.
The search team had found her laptop, journals, a guitar and a few more items from the hotel.

Nepali Police admitted that it failed to figure out what might have happened to her. But it said it would investigate from scratch from a new angle.

More: http://www.thehimalayantimes.com/fullNews.php?headline=Missing+US+girl%27s+travel+p artner+in+Thailand&NewsID=248193&a=3

:waitasec:

Is SM the fairhaired guy in the photo they found on Aubrey's laptop???

tarabull
07-02-2012, 01:29 PM
Could fear be hindering search for missing hiker?

Aubrey Sacco was living up to her motto, "glitter the world," on her five-month post-college trip through South Asia before she disappeared in Nepal last spring, her family says.

The 23-year-old artist and musician from Colorado started her trip in December, teaching yoga to vacationers in Sri Lanka. Later, she went to India, studying yoga and volunteering to help schoolchildren with art and music.

[snip]

Sacco vanished in April during a hike along Nepal's sylvan and rocky Langtang trek. Some volunteers who've helped look for her say they've heard a disturbing refrain from villagers: Even if they or others in the area did know what caused her disappearance, they wouldn't reveal it.

[snip]

Although many factors -- such as the area's remoteness and difficult terrain -- have made clues to Sacco's fate hard to come by, the villagers' fear of Nepali authorities may be a significant obstacle in the hunt for the truth, some of the searchers say.

MUCH MUCH MUCH more: http://edition.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/11/03/aubrey.sacco.nepal/

also snipped...Although giving no indication that they do know what happened, the villagers said people there fear that police would improperly point the finger at them if they signaled they knew anything, said BK and other volunteers to whom CNN spoke over the past few months.

While villagers' fear of authority has many roots, including a bloody 10-year insurgency that concluded just four years ago, they cite a specific case: The imprisonment of four Nepali men who reported finding the bludgeoned body of a British hiker in the same valley in 2000.

The area villagers believe the men are innocent.

..."All the villagers in the Langtang area say that [the arrestees in the 2000 case] didn't do anything, and that the real people who did never got caught. That's what's making the search [for Sacco] so difficult," said BK's American wife, Sandra Krasa.

kemo
07-02-2012, 04:07 PM
I have been to Nepal and am somewhat familiar with the situation.

National Parks in Nepal are different from National Parks in the States. There are villages in the park where local people live, have farms, graze animals and rent rooms to trekkers. The "trail" that Aubrey was trekking on is also used by local people to travel and transport products between villages on the backs of Yaks. (There are no vehicles permitted on the trail). The trail is perhaps 6 ft wide and well marked. It can be steep in places but it is not likely that someone would suffer a serious accident on it or get lost if they stuck to the trail. Trekkers usually start at the Village of Syabru Besi (which can reached by bus) and then pass through a seris of villages as the trail climbs into the village of Kyanjin Gompahigh in the high Himalayas perhaps 15 miles away. These villages provide food and lodging for the trekkers. In Langtang National Park, few trekkers would carry camping gear.

Apparently Aubrey spent the night of April 21 at the Namaste Hotel in the village of Pahiro, first village along the route. The next day she apparently had a meal in the village of Hotel Lama, about 3 miles away and there have been no verified sighting since. Two miles down the trail, there is an Army checkpoint where all trekkers must register. Aubrey did not register. It is very likely that something happened in the two mile stretch beyond Hotel Lama.

On June 26 of this year, Belgian trekker Debbie Maveau was found near the trail somewhere between Syabru Besi and the Army check point. She was apparently not robbed (her camera and quite a bit of money was in her procession) or sexually assaulted but she was violently attacked and decapitated. This sort of murder raises all kinds of questions including the possibility that Aubrey met the same fate. I suspect the search efforts for Aubrey would now focus in the area just off the trail past Hotel Lama.

Nepal is definitely not "crime free" but it does not have a particularly bad reputation. It’s a poor undeveloped country but it has a very important tourist industry and trekkers in the National Park are vital to the local economy. Any crime against a trekker would threaten the livelihood of the other villagers. My guess is that people would not "cover-up" such a crime but they would probably fear that the police would be pressured to fine "somebody" to blame it on. As this area has relatively few people and they speak a dialect that is different from other areas, villagers would be very aware of any Nepalis who weren't from there. My guess is that these crimes were committed by one or more locals who have carefully concealed their activities.

Walker
07-02-2012, 04:29 PM
I disagree. If her worries were as cited (who to talk to and what to do, etc), then that doesn't sound like intuition to me, that sounds like social anxiety. Which, in turn, leads me to think she may have been in over her head.

If she was having a lot of social anxiety, that may have de-sensitised her to true intuition of danger.

Jon Krakauer talks about this in his book Into Thin Air when he mentions experienced climbers who have avoided disaster when their inner voice told them not to go for the summit on a particular day, even though conditions seemed right. He noted that his own inner voice was never of any use because it always screamed "we're all gonna diiiieeeeeee!!!"

If Aubrey was used to experiencing such worries (as she implies by saying she was having such thoughts before she left), then she may have been so used to it that when she did meet danger, she didn't recognise the difference.

I will look up the Krakauer book. In my own backpacking experience, an inner voice saved me on a few occasions, for which I thank God.

Thank you for bringing up AS's state of mind.

One aspect of these disappearances that mystifies me is how even a person who has been misinformed about the risks could not get the message from the mountain itself.

I reread AS's first blog entry, and you are right that she seems to be afflicted with intense social anxiety. De Becker ("The Gift of Fear") warns that we should never ignore actual fear, but he specifies that he does not mean the sort of nervousness that one might feel before a job interview or a public speaking engagement.

AS seems to be desperately trying to push an extreme case of "jitters" out of her head. Since everyone has felt intense self-consciousness in a strange place, readers can easily relate to her blog. Self-consciousness however can block self-awareness.

But we need to also consider that anxiety can "float;" that is, the afflicted individual cannot cope with the true source of his anxiety, so his mind suggests alternate sources, none of which satisfy the painful nagging sensation that "something isn't right."

Was AS nervous because the English lady might not think she is using her fork properly (British vs. Continental style) or was she really just afraid of being alone in picture-perfect paradise surrounded by strangers whom she didn’t quite trust?

The thought processes reflected in AS's blog are our only evidence in this case.

The philosophy associated with her yoga practice may have led her to try desperately to be "in the moment," but did this concept cause her to repress her awareness of important warning signals that she was in a risky situation?

Now I know that yoga enthusiasts will immediately feel defensive, and argue that yoga is supposed to increase your self-knowledge and self-awareness, and does not advocate ignoring dangers. For the moment, let's just consider the possibility that the yoga, like every other belief system, is sometimes misunderstood.

AS joined the Art of Living yoga organization (AOL) in the fall of 2009 in Colorado.

AS's blog describes stages of her trip (Note: dates are estimates based on blog entries, and not necessarily exact):

http://blogs.bootsnall.com/aubrey/

1. Starts in an extremely expensive ultra-luxury resort in Sri Lanka, where AS is a temporary yoga instructor (December 2009 - January 12, 2010);
2. Bangalore "couch surfing" (January 12 - 14) which means staying with families in their homes for a small room and board fee;
3. AOL Ashram in Bangalore (January 15 - 23), including a small group meeting with Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, a guru with celebrity status in India and an international following, who founded AOL;
4. Auroville, where she went sight-seeing with new-found Western friends; attends small group sessions regarding spirituality taught by Mooji, who also has celebrity status in India and a world-wide following (January 24 - February 11);
5. Mysore, where she studied yoga at a famous shala founded by Sri. K Pattabhi Jois (February 12 - April 4);
6. Trip northward, which took four days (April 4 - April 8);
blog ends with description the train trip northward dated April 15, 2010; but we know that she visited Dharjeeling in India, before visiting Katmandu in Nepal where she stayed in a hotel; and then took the bus to Syabrubesi in Nepal to begin her Langtang trek.


Blogger Beth-aime LaBonte visited the same shala in Mysore, during roughly the same period as AS. BLB left the shala within several days after AS arrived.

Yoga teacher BLB’s description of the shala’s yoga program:
http://blog.travelpod.com/travel-blog-entries/bethaimelabonte/1/1263886026/tpod.html

BLB entry February 7, 2010:

In Jayashree's class, Narasimhan talked of positive logic. To practice ignoring negative emotions and thoughts and to not let others negativity effect you. He said to observe it, but don't let it bring you down. You must think positive, negativity spreads if you dive into it. You can't fight it. You have to ignore it. If you can't ignore it do pranayama. If that still doesn't work do asana. It can't be just the mind doing all of the work.

Again, to the yoga community, I am not trying to blame yoga itself. I am just asking, Can a useful idea sometimes be taken too far in the wrong direction or in the wrong context?

Also, this consideration is only a beginning, and certainly not a complete answer to the question of what may have happened in this case, and in other similar cases.

Walker
07-02-2012, 04:44 PM
:waitasec:

Is SM the fairhaired guy in the photo they found on Aubrey's laptop???

No, these are two different people. SM was located very shortly after AS disappeared.

AS’s site:
http://aubreysacco.com/
Then select:

Search Effort Update Page.

Walker
07-02-2012, 05:11 PM
Copied from AS facebook page:

Aubrey's first post December 18, 2009 to her "Glitter the World" blog: http://blogs.bootsnall.com/aubrey/aybowan.html

Protected: Ayubowan!

Ayubowan! This is the Sinhalese greeting for we wish you a long life!

After a 23 hour plane ride (which I wont bore you with the details of) I was greeted by a nice man with kind eyes, wearing a white top and white sarong holding the Aman Resortssign. I was kindly escorted to the car which would take me down the one road on the West side of Sri Lanka, to meet the spa Manager, Natalie.

Worrying: robbing us of the present moment

I had felt a little numb up to this point because I was trying not to have any expectations or worries about my trip. But now, as I drove 3 hours to Fort Galle, an old Colonial town in which one of the Aman resorts, Amangalla, was located, I was feeling a little unsure. I wasnt at all bothered by the large population of people or poverty, Im used to it and have seen it often while traveling, but in my car I was simply an observer. I started to create small worries in my head such as, who will I talk to or what will I do all day? These were exactly the thoughts I was avoiding having before my trip. This happens when you are not fully present and in the moment, your mind starts to wander, creating endless stories. Worrying comes from thinking of the future. I was imagining myself on the street with these people, trying to think of what I would do all day with my time. Truth was though, I wouldnt even be on these road sides, I wouldnt even be with these people, and all of my small worries were a waste of my precious time. I quickly snapped out of it. Realizing that I had my first opportunity for some Sri Lankan cultural immersion, I chatted up my driver. Rahn, is his name. He is from Tangalle, 5 hours from Colombo. He lives with his mother and siblings, even though he is 29. He told me stories of the Tsunami, which just 4 days later I have come to know is a frequent topic of conversation, he fortunately lived far enough away that his home wasnt effected. He pointed out places along the road that unfortunately were.

We entered Fort Galle which is located in Galle on the West coast of Sri Lanka. Fort Galle was on the water surrounded by tall mossy stone walls. A large white colonial building at the forts entrance, which had once been quarters for soldiers, was Amangalla. I was greeted by several handsome butlers who brought me water and a cold lemon smelling towellete for my sweaty face, and instructed to wait in the enormous lobby to meet Natalie, the woman who invited me to stay at Amanwella. I had only emailed with Nalatie and imagined her to be a sweet lovely Sri Lankan woman, and for some reason I pictured that she would be shorter than me. Oh how our mind creates false images, right? She is a serious English woman with a strong accent. Very conservative in her appearance and attitude, I wonder what she thought of my sweaty scrubs and perma-fried affro.

Handstands during the hydrotherapy session

Natalie arranged a room for the night so I could rest and have a swim. Natalie insisted I have a hydrotherapy session, and I mean insisted. I kindly said that having a swim in the pool would be enough, but she said I looked like I need it especially after such a long flight as if sitting in a hot tub, sauna, and steam room combonation would perhaps make me look a little more presentable in such a high end establishment :)

So I finally accepted the offer, but got walked in on by one of the spa employees doing a handstand underwater in the hot tub. She must had heard all of the splashing from outside of the room and came in to make sure I was okay and seeing only my feet peeking out of the water, was starteled and thought I was drowning! I couldnt stand the heat too long so I went to the pool for a swim. It was only 17:30 and it was starting to get dark. As I lay on my back floating in the water and watching the sunset, I caught a glimpse of the bats! The bats of course, only come out after dark. I then went to my lovely room for the night. I felt like a bull in a china shop! Everything was just so nice and perfect. While walking around the room and peeking at everything, I stubbed my toe on a foot rest and went flying into the desk and knocked over a large steel calendar!

Dont look up from your plate!

Eating at Amangalla is quite the adventure. I have already learned how to cut food with my left hand, instead of cutting with my right hand then clumsily switching the fork and knife. Its just because that's what Natalie does. It must be proper. I dont know, Ive never really been anywhere that I have needed to know such manners. Natalie is not rude to me, but I can sometimes see her watching me and I can only imagine what she is thinking. I just like to think that maybe she isnt looking at me in disapproval, but perhaps she thinks Im interesting. She has repeatedly told other workers how although I denied being tired, I was exhausted after my flight and the hydrotherapy was good for me. She was gazing at my earrings the other night, hopefully out of curiosity, but hasnt said anything. However she was appalled by my half blue fingernails. She insists on arranging a manicure for me.

Anyways, back to the food. The butlers watch your every move and almost after every sip of water, the glass is refilled. My chair is pulled out for me, and and my napkin placed on my lap. If I even look up from eating my delicous food someone is at my side asking if I need anything. I cant possibly need anything else! I have more than I need. I ordered traditional Sri Lankan Rice and Curry my first night at Amangalla and was surprised to see two servers carrying out a large tray, one on each side, which consisted of 13 plates of food!! I cant even believe that they think I can eat all of that!

I wont be ripped off, not even on my first tuk-tuk ride!

Before leaving the fort to go to Amanwella, I needed to buy some clothes. I had only brought 3 pairs of yoga pants and 3 tops in my backpack. I needed to be respectful around town, wearing a long skirt and a top that covers my shoulders and chest. Natalie arranged for a tuk-tuk (Sri Lankan term for Rikshaw) to take me around the town shopping. She gave him a list of shops to take me to, then we were off. Only about 2 minutes outside of the Fort was the town center. I could have walked here! Apparantly though no one who stays at Amangalla would walk to the town, maybe they wouldnt even go to town. Rahashan took me to a few small department stores, most skirts and tops were around 300 500 Sri Lankan Rupees. One American Dollar = 111 Sri Lankan Rupees. I knew that the department stores would be more expensive so I asked him to take me to the street market. He was taken aback by my request, not understanding why I would want to shop at the market. I guess Im not a typical Amangalla guest !

Once Rahashan understood that I wanted to really see the town and buy some things from the locals, he took me to all of the great places. He introduced me to his cousins who worked at the shoe store where I bought my sandals (300 SLRs), took me to see the vibrant colors of the vegetable market, and even brought me to see the fire station where he worked when he wasnt driving the Tuk-tuk. I really enjoyed Rahashans company especially since he helped me decide what color sandals to get, but upon my return to the fort, he asked me fo 1,000 SLRs. I quickly had a flashback of what people have told me about riding the tuk-tuks and how much they should cost. The drivers will generally try to rip you off. So he wanted around 10 American dollars for a driving me a few blocks. I handed him 600 rupees, which was MORE than enough, and thanked him. He was dissappointed, but I wasnt going to be disprespected and taken advantage of just because Im American, and I wont stand for that, not even on my first tuk-tuk ride. It wasnt out of character for him to do that, its quite normal actually. I still enjoyed my time with Rahashan.

And I wont cry over spilled afternoon tea either

Soon after returning from the city I was notified that Natalie arranged for a car to take us to Amanwella and that I must eat lunch and pack up. I did as I was told, then thought it might be posh for me to have some afternoon tea delivered to my room while I gathered my things. Well of course like a little girl, I spilled my tea all over the nice Amangalla furniture.

Not sorry about wanting a Sari

Amanwella is between two towns called Matara and Tangalla. The southern area of Sri Lanka is more rural and the cities arent as big. It was a beautiful 3 hour drive from Galle. Natalie and I discussed various topics, ranging from our family and holiday traditions, to the history along the roadside and her thoughts on Saris, a traditional Indian dress that many woman still wear. Natalie has never worn a sari and if she gets married, she might just wear one. She thinks that Sri Lankans giggle at western woman in saris because they dont know how to wear them. On the other hand I have heard that the people like it when foreigners wear saris because it shows respect for their culture and traditions. I dont care what Natalie thinks, I will probably be wearing one very soon, they are incredibly beautiful and graceful, and come in every vibrant color imaginable. I think I would like to buy an orange one and a turquoise one!

Sharing my room with some small but noisy friends

There is a dirt road turnoff from the main road (the same one that goes all the way down the west side from colombo) to go to Amanwella. I arrived there around 8:30 at night and was greeted by a beautiful Sri Lankan woman named Anusha. I was given a short and quick tour of the main area, which is separate from the rooms. The library, courtyard, lounge/tea room, and dinner area. There is a 40 meter pool in the main area as well. I think I will have my mommy send me my swim goggles so I can swim laps every day! I was escorted to my room by Amila, a nice handsome young man, in a cute little white tuk-tuk. The suites are each their own little villa style building and have their own little walkways. Anusha showed me to my room, where I was greeted by my own personal pool! Goodness. I had seen photos on the Amanwella website, but I just still couldnt believe my own eyes! I have my very own king size bed in a large room, beautiful freestanding bathtub and two sinks! So I can wash my face in one and brush my teeth in the other.

I really giggle at all of this because it is much more than I need. I am not used to these luxories and certainly not used to staying in such places while traveling! I saw that I had a large balcony and could hear the waves, but because it was so dark, I had no idea what lie beyond that. I would have to wait until the morning to find out. Although I was ready for bed and had no more energy for splendid surprises, I discovered that I wasnt and would probably never be alone in my room. As I was walking to bed I nearly tripped over a tiny baby lizard. This one was dark, he ran under my bed. Fine with me if I didnt have to look at him. But then I lay in bed and up on the vaulted high ceilings was one of the while lizards, maybe about 6 inches long. You can almost instantly see them once they start making their lurk sounds. I spotted him on my ceiling after a lurk or two and begged that his suction cup fingers where good because Id really hate for him to fall from all the way up thereright on my face!

tarabull
07-02-2012, 05:59 PM
No, these are two different people. SM was located very shortly after AS disappeared.

ASs site:
http://aubreysacco.com/
Then select:

Search Effort Update Page.

Thanks so much for the directions ;)

My heartaches for her loved ones reading the updates :(

I do see there is a post regarding the unknown guy in the photo (different from SM) -- seems he was (also) located:

snipped from March 3, 2012:

...Hopefully everyone knows that we have now found the mysterious man in the pictures we were posting on Facebook for over a year. Our Canadian friend and consultant found him. He is not a US citizen and he spent time with Aubrey in Darjeeling. He is a good guy and there are no surprises here.

In addition - snipped from the latest update of May 23, 2012:

...What has happened is that we have found all of the people whose picture or names we posted on Facebook and they have all come up clean. So in some ways the search is narrowing but in some it is expanding. All theories are still on the table. Aubrey could have met with an accident, foul play or somehow been subverted, but again no hard evidence.

Walker
07-02-2012, 06:55 PM
I have been to Nepal and am somewhat familiar with the situation.

National Parks in Nepal are different from National Parks in the States. There are villages in the park where local people live, have farms, graze animals and rent rooms to trekkers. The "trail" that Aubrey was trekking on is also used by local people to travel and transport products between villages on the backs of Yaks. (There are no vehicles permitted on the trail). The trail is perhaps 6 ft wide and well marked. It can be steep in places but it is not likely that someone would suffer a serious accident on it or get lost if they stuck to the trail. Trekkers usually start at the Village of Syabru Besi (which can reached by bus) and then pass through a seris of villages as the trail climbs into the village of Kyanjin Gompahigh in the high Himalayas perhaps 15 miles away. These villages provide food and lodging for the trekkers. In Langtang National Park, few trekkers would carry camping gear.



AS left behind her camera (!) on her trip to this most scenic park, as well as her cell phone, laptop and journal. Since she likely did not need too much camp gear, could the reason be that she was trying to be completely "in the moment"? Cell service and internet is available (but not 100% reliable) at all but the highest elevations of this park.

tarabull
07-02-2012, 10:12 PM
More foreign tourists go missing in Nepal
May 28, 2011

snipped...In 2005, speculation arose about a possible serial killer preying on young women travelling alone in Nepal, after a French and German tourist went missing from a protected national park close to Kathmandu.

More at link: http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/world-news/more-foreign-tourists-go-missing-in-nepal_100539219.html

tarabull
07-02-2012, 10:21 PM
June, 2012 - Zisimos Souflas, 27, disappeared in a small town popular with hikers - in a case that came to light just days after a young Belgium woman was found decapitated.

June, 2012 - Debbie Maveau, 23, had been missing for 10 days before her badly decomposed body was found on June 14 beneath a hiking trail in the Langtang National Park, on the Tibetan border, police said.

December, 2011 - Lena Sessions, 23, an American, was hiking alone in Langtang in December when a knife-wielding man threatened to rape and kill her but she was able to escape.

May, 2011 - 49-year-old Japanese woman, identified only as Makiko, has been missing from a valley in northern Nepal since Wednesday May 25th.

May, 2011 - John Robert Schrumpf, said to be in his 20's was abducted early Sunday (22nd?) morning from his hotel in Kathmandu’s prime tourist area - forcibly taken away from the Dream Home Hotel in Thamel around 2 a.m. Police said they were hunting for the missing man who had been a long-time resident of Nepal. Schrumpf had bee working as a volunteer for a charitable organization living in the hotel for months. Around 2 a.m. Sunday when the guard at the gate was shoved aside by two men, who claimed to be from the security forces. They forced their way in. The intruders intercepted the American and took him away.

March, 2011 - 19-year-old Lithuanian, Paulius Zavadckis, who went missing in March this year. The teen had gone to Nepal in February to volunteer for a charitable project in the Helambu region. His family says after leaving the project, he sent an email March 7, following which he went out of contact. The day he sent that last email, the teen was traced to Pokhara city, a popular tourist destination.

April, 2010 - 23-year-old Aubrey Sacco

December, 2008 - 32-year-old British tourist, Julian Wynne, disappeared while trekking in the Everest region.

October, 2006 - The body of the missing German, Sabine Grueneklee, was found in the Nagarjuna park in 2006

December, 2005 - Nine months after Sabine, the remains of the French tourist, Celine Henry, were also found in the same area.

March, 2005 - 41-year-old Kristina Kovacevic was found dead in a ravine near Dole. When her sister Karolin reached Namche Bazaar, police told her imidiatly, that they had found the body. Dole is on the way to Gokyo. Till now it is unclear if it was an accident or a crime. Kristina from Germany send an Email on march13th from namche bazar. Since then, no other mesage was received. As she had planed to meet her friend Silke begin of April in Bali but did not come, her sister Karolin and her friend Silke ask for your help.

2004 - Gareth Koch, 24, vanished while trekking in Nepal with a friend in March 2004 aged 24. The two went their separate ways and alarm bells rang after Gareth failed to return home as expected.

2003 - Alex Ratnasothy, 24, was never found after a robbery as he was on his way to the town of Namche Bazaar

______________________________

Not sure what to do with this list....but it's appaulling isn't it!?!??!?!?!?!?!?!

GrainneDhu
07-02-2012, 11:38 PM
I will look up the Krakauer book. In my own backpacking experience, an inner voice saved me on a few occasions, for which I thank God.

Thank you for bringing up AS's state of mind.

One aspect of these disappearances that mystifies me is how even a person who has been misinformed about the risks could not get the message from the mountain itself.

I reread AS's first blog entry, and you are right that she seems to be afflicted with intense social anxiety. De Becker ("The Gift of Fear") warns that we should never ignore actual fear, but he specifies that he does not mean the sort of nervousness that one might feel before a job interview or a public speaking engagement.

AS seems to be desperately trying to push an extreme case of "jitters" out of her head. Since everyone has felt intense self-consciousness in a strange place, readers can easily relate to her blog. Self-consciousness however can block self-awareness.

But we need to also consider that anxiety can "float;" that is, the afflicted individual cannot cope with the true source of his anxiety, so his mind suggests alternate sources, none of which satisfy the painful nagging sensation that "something isn't right."

Was AS nervous because the English lady might not think she is using her fork properly (British vs. Continental style) or was she really just afraid of being alone in picture-perfect paradise surrounded by strangers whom she didnt quite trust?

The thought processes reflected in AS's blog are our only evidence in this case.

The philosophy associated with her yoga practice may have led her to try desperately to be "in the moment," but did this concept cause her to repress her awareness of important warning signals that she was in a risky situation?

Now I know that yoga enthusiasts will immediately feel defensive, and argue that yoga is supposed to increase your self-knowledge and self-awareness, and does not advocate ignoring dangers. For the moment, let's just consider the possibility that the yoga, like every other belief system, is sometimes misunderstood.

AS joined the Art of Living yoga organization (AOL) in the fall of 2009 in Colorado.

AS's blog describes stages of her trip (Note: dates are estimates based on blog entries, and not necessarily exact):

http://blogs.bootsnall.com/aubrey/

1. Starts in an extremely expensive ultra-luxury resort in Sri Lanka, where AS is a temporary yoga instructor (December 2009 - January 12, 2010);
2. Bangalore "couch surfing" (January 12 - 14) which means staying with families in their homes for a small room and board fee;
3. AOL Ashram in Bangalore (January 15 - 23), including a small group meeting with Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, a guru with celebrity status in India and an international following, who founded AOL;
4. Auroville, where she went sight-seeing with new-found Western friends; attends small group sessions regarding spirituality taught by Mooji, who also has celebrity status in India and a world-wide following (January 24 - February 11);
5. Mysore, where she studied yoga at a famous shala founded by Sri. K Pattabhi Jois (February 12 - April 4);
6. Trip northward, which took four days (April 4 - April 8);
blog ends with description the train trip northward dated April 15, 2010; but we know that she visited Dharjeeling in India, before visiting Katmandu in Nepal where she stayed in a hotel; and then took the bus to Syabrubesi in Nepal to begin her Langtang trek.


Blogger Beth-aime LaBonte visited the same shala in Mysore, during roughly the same period as AS. BLB left the shala within several days after AS arrived.

Yoga teacher BLBs description of the shalas yoga program:
http://blog.travelpod.com/travel-blog-entries/bethaimelabonte/1/1263886026/tpod.html

BLB entry February 7, 2010:


Again, to the yoga community, I am not trying to blame yoga itself. I am just asking, Can a useful idea sometimes be taken too far in the wrong direction or in the wrong context?

Also, this consideration is only a beginning, and certainly not a complete answer to the question of what may have happened in this case, and in other similar cases.

Another book by Jon Krakauer you might enjoy is Eiger Dreams, which is a compilation of a series of articles he wrote over the years covering many different aspects of climbing and hiking.

I think that mindfulness (a general term for the art of living in the moment) is a great enhancement of one's intuition, in that it shows a skilled practitioner the difference between anxiety and true fear. If a person is operating in a state of high alarm or very close to it most of the time, they are unlikely to respond to the first inklings of true fear effectively.

However, like many other skills, there is a point when learning mindfulness (whether through yoga, meditation, cognitive behavioural therapy or whatever) where the would-be practitioner knows just enough to be dangerous, usually to themselves.

An analogy would be to people learning to ride hunter/jumpers. Beginners are generally safe from serious injury because they fall off before a situation gets serious. They may suffer some minor bruising but they generally don't get seriously hurt. It's the people who are at the serious intermediate level who tend to get seriously injured. It's because they have enough skill to stay on past the early part of a crash but not enough skill to avert a serious crash.

Serious intermediates also have enough skills so that they are no longer satisfied riding "push button" horses but they don't realise they aren't ready yet for less experienced horses (this was where Christopher Reeve made the big mistake).

As I recall, Aubrey made references to feeling anxious and nervous before she even left for her trip, while she was still in the planning stages at home. That suggests to me that she tended towards anxiety (and in particular, social anxiety), rather than having a free floating anxiety due to being in danger.

Walker
07-03-2012, 01:21 AM
Another book by Jon Krakauer you might enjoy is Eiger Dreams, which is a compilation of a series of articles he wrote over the years covering many different aspects of climbing and hiking.

I think that mindfulness (a general term for the art of living in the moment) is a great enhancement of one's intuition, in that it shows a skilled practitioner the difference between anxiety and true fear. If a person is operating in a state of high alarm or very close to it most of the time, they are unlikely to respond to the first inklings of true fear effectively.

However, like many other skills, there is a point when learning mindfulness (whether through yoga, meditation, cognitive behavioural therapy or whatever) where the would-be practitioner knows just enough to be dangerous, usually to themselves.

An analogy would be to people learning to ride hunter/jumpers. Beginners are generally safe from serious injury because they fall off before a situation gets serious. They may suffer some minor bruising but they generally don't get seriously hurt. It's the people who are at the serious intermediate level who tend to get seriously injured. It's because they have enough skill to stay on past the early part of a crash but not enough skill to avert a serious crash.

Serious intermediates also have enough skills so that they are no longer satisfied riding "push button" horses but they don't realise they aren't ready yet for less experienced horses (this was where Christopher Reeve made the big mistake).

As I recall, Aubrey made references to feeling anxious and nervous before she even left for her trip, while she was still in the planning stages at home. That suggests to me that she tended towards anxiety (and in particular, social anxiety), rather than having a free floating anxiety due to being in danger.

The concept of mindfulness or being in the moment may be valuable in certain situations, but I wonder if it isn't like telling a driver "Be in the car." Of course, he must be in the car, but if he isn't looking forward and checking behind, he is in trouble. Similarly, tackling Langtang, one must consider the dangers; for example, the fact that Himalayan black bears, unlike their American counterparts, are aggressive towards humans. Being in the moment occurs naturally; for example, when one gets wrapped up in an interesting hobby or project at work. You don't need to tell yourself to be in the moment when you truly are.

One aspect of her trip which I hesitate to bring up is that she seems drawn to cultish organizations. She met with Sri Sri, Mooji and attended the Pattabhi shala. Of course, some of the criticism may be unfair, and my intention is not to disparage these men or their followings, but seems odd that she just went from one, to the next, to the next. Perhaps she was a bit suggestible.

AS needed to confront her anxieties, and act assertively, even if that meant disappointing other people. The Sri Lanka hotel room was beautiful, and she posted the pictures on her blog. But it was infested with geckos, and staying there alone must have been uncomfortable. Among the guests were rich female sexual tourists who were taking advantage of the impoverished "beach boys." The poverty of the local people could also have intensified her anxious state.

BLB's blog which I linked in an earlier post describes a regime which despite her appealing writing style comes across as dull routine. The program seems to take self-absorption to its maximum level. Perhaps AS was bored at the shala and therefore decided to go to Nepal, where she might meet other young Coloradans, and have fun touring Katmandu. You are right that she suffered social anxiety, but yet she seems a social type.

In the video of AS teaching in Mysore, the poverty viewed briefly from the window of the classroom is appalling. She tries to teach the class "hokey-pokey" (an American song & dance for children), but they seem quite upset. The teachers too seem suspicious and disapproving. The origin of harmless "hokey-pokey" is unknown, but the name may be associated with "hocus-pocus" or magic. Being misunderstood may have added frustration to her anxiety, but she describes almost nothing of this experience in her blog.

diamond12
07-03-2012, 02:51 PM
This thread really shocked me, (well most threads on WS do:() but I had no idea of such things going on with tourists in Nepal. I was planning to go there on my own, I guess I have to reconsider my plans.
I hope the family of the missing ones will be able to get some answers one day.

GrainneDhu
07-03-2012, 04:15 PM
The concept of mindfulness or being in the moment may be valuable in certain situations, but I wonder if it isn't like telling a driver "Be in the car." Of course, he must be in the car, but if he isn't looking forward and checking behind, he is in trouble. Similarly, tackling Langtang, one must consider the dangers; for example, the fact that Himalayan black bears, unlike their American counterparts, are aggressive towards humans. Being in the moment occurs naturally; for example, when one gets wrapped up in an interesting hobby or project at work. You don't need to tell yourself to be in the moment when you truly are.

One aspect of her trip which I hesitate to bring up is that she seems drawn to cultish organizations. She met with Sri Sri, Mooji and attended the Pattabhi shala. Of course, some of the criticism may be unfair, and my intention is not to disparage these men or their followings, but seems odd that she just went from one, to the next, to the next. Perhaps she was a bit suggestible.

AS needed to confront her anxieties, and act assertively, even if that meant disappointing other people. The Sri Lanka hotel room was beautiful, and she posted the pictures on her blog. But it was infested with geckos, and staying there alone must have been uncomfortable. Among the guests were rich female sexual tourists who were taking advantage of the impoverished "beach boys." The poverty of the local people could also have intensified her anxious state.

BLB's blog which I linked in an earlier post describes a regime which despite her appealing writing style comes across as dull routine. The program seems to take self-absorption to its maximum level. Perhaps AS was bored at the shala and therefore decided to go to Nepal, where she might meet other young Coloradans, and have fun touring Katmandu. You are right that she suffered social anxiety, but yet she seems a social type.

In the video of AS teaching in Mysore, the poverty viewed briefly from the window of the classroom is appalling. She tries to teach the class "hokey-pokey" (an American song & dance for children), but they seem quite upset. The teachers too seem suspicious and disapproving. The origin of harmless "hokey-pokey" is unknown, but the name may be associated with "hocus-pocus" or magic. Being misunderstood may have added frustration to her anxiety, but she describes almost nothing of this experience in her blog.

Being in the moment is the opposite of focusing on a single point of interest. It means to be aware of the entire moment while maintaining a certain emotional detachment from any of it.

At least, that's what I was taught as a child growing up in a Korean Buddhist household. The sect(s) that Aubrey followed may well have had a different interpretation. There are as many or more Buddhist sects than there are Christian sects (and they are equally as contentious).

Your mention of the Himalayan black bear makes me wonder if one or more of the missing tourists may have fallen victim to them. American black bears are also aggressive towards humans (much more so than the larger grizzly bear). If the Himalayan black bears started to associate trekkers with food, I'm certain they would be likely to attack a single human hiking alone.

In the US, American black bears have demonstrated that they can tell the difference between hunters (bad) and campers/hikers (yum yum!).

Add in that the humans are likely to be following a well defined path and to a Himalayan black bear, that's the equivalent of pizza delivery.

People who suffer from social anxiety usually do want to be social; that's where their conflict arises. If someone is not naturally social, being socially anxious isn't perceived as a problem.

As for teaching the hokey-pokey, I think there's a simpler explanation than associating the song with "hocus pocus." When I was younger, I had a couple opportunities to go to various places in Asia and southeast Asia to teach English, so I learned about it.

People in Asia and southeast Asia who are learning English are almost invariably doing so in hopes of finding a lucrative job that requires fluency in English. The students are often paying huge sums of money for classes and they tend to be very goal oriented, much more so than many Americans are. They're not looking for fun, they are looking for the opportunity to suck up as much vocabulary and as many grammar rules as they can in the time allotted. They want to learn business English, not American cultural memes.

A teacher who was not treating them seriously would be a waste of their time and money and hence seen as being clueless at best and downright disrespectful or mocking at worst.

That says to me that Aubrey may have been more than a little tone deaf in reading people from other cultures.

GrainneDhu
07-03-2012, 04:18 PM
This thread really shocked me, (well most threads on WS do:() but I had no idea of such things going on with tourists in Nepal. I was planning to go there on my own, I guess I have to reconsider my plans.
I hope the family of the missing ones will be able to get some answers one day.

I hope it won't deter you. From all I've heard, Nepal is fantastic, according to my cousin who trekked there for 5 months a couple years ago.

Follow common sense precautions that you'd follow in any strange environment and you'll be fine.

Walker
07-05-2012, 06:58 PM
This thread really shocked me, (well most threads on WS do:() but I had no idea of such things going on with tourists in Nepal. I was planning to go there on my own, I guess I have to reconsider my plans.
I hope the family of the missing ones will be able to get some answers one day.

Excellent guides can be hired for less than $10 per day. If you do your homework, you should be fine.

One problem with young Western women who go to third world countries alone is that their essential values are in conflict with the socially conservative environment. Even if they are trying to be respectful, their natural inclination is to be in disagreement with the local culture. This inclination may lead them to inadvertently offend the local people. The female traveler who needs to go it alone should stay in US or Europe, and be very careful even there.

Walker
07-07-2012, 11:44 PM
... May, 2011 - 49-year-old Japanese woman, identified only as Makiko, has been missing from a valley in northern Nepal since Wednesday May 25th.


This lady was found.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/13730030


A Japanese hiker who got lost in Nepal's mountains has told journalists how she survived for almost two weeks by eating plants and praying.

Makiko Iwafuchi said she strayed from the main trekking path on 25 May while hiking near Gosainkunda lake, north of Kathmandu.

GrainneDhu
07-08-2012, 12:12 AM
Excellent guides can be hired for less than $10 per day. If you do your homework, you should be fine.

One problem with young Western women who go to third world countries alone is that their essential values are in conflict with the socially conservative environment. Even if they are trying to be respectful, their natural inclination is to be in disagreement with the local culture. This inclination may lead them to inadvertently offend the local people. The female traveler who needs to go it alone should stay in US or Europe, and be very careful even there.

I agree, with a proviso.

My cousin is adventurous and at 55, looks like she's in her early 30s (she has a job that keeps her very physically fit and she lives in England, so no ageing skin from too much sunning). She's been literally all over the world, sometimes alone, sometimes with a tour, with no problems.

She follows her gut, even in the planning stages. Even though she's ridden on horseback alone across Mongolia (very tough terrain and not an easy way to travel), she doesn't assume she can take on every trip alone. When she reads up on her destination, she decides early whether she will feel comfortable going alone or whether it would be better to go as part of a tour. There are advantages to each approach.

She is also not fussy and goes with the flow. In some places, finding a cooked bug in her soup is cause to call the waiter and make a discreet fuss, in other places, she just shrugs, fishes it out and eats the rest of the soup.

Likewise, losing things, having things stolen, etc, is just part of travelling. There's a fine line between sticking up for yourself and being so obnoxious that the locals don't care what happens to you. If you're not sure of where that line is, go with a tour.

But go! There's a wonderful world out there to see.

Walker
07-08-2012, 01:41 AM
I agree, with a proviso.

My cousin is adventurous and at 55, looks like she's in her early 30s (she has a job that keeps her very physically fit and she lives in England, so no ageing skin from too much sunning). She's been literally all over the world, sometimes alone, sometimes with a tour, with no problems.

She follows her gut, even in the planning stages. Even though she's ridden on horseback alone across Mongolia (very tough terrain and not an easy way to travel), she doesn't assume she can take on every trip alone. When she reads up on her destination, she decides early whether she will feel comfortable going alone or whether it would be better to go as part of a tour. There are advantages to each approach.

She is also not fussy and goes with the flow. In some places, finding a cooked bug in her soup is cause to call the waiter and make a discreet fuss, in other places, she just shrugs, fishes it out and eats the rest of the soup.

Likewise, losing things, having things stolen, etc, is just part of travelling. There's a fine line between sticking up for yourself and being so obnoxious that the locals don't care what happens to you. If you're not sure of where that line is, go with a tour.

But go! There's a wonderful world out there to see.

In ASs case, the local people reportedly were concerned about her, but she didnt listen to their advice.

http://site.thehimalayantimes.com/fullNews.php?headline=LNP+issues+warning+against+s olo+treks+after+missing+US+hiker&NewsID=248464


Aubrey was asked not to travel alone, but she ignored the locals advice, [Deputy Superintendent of Police (DSP) in Rasuwa, Om Bahadur Rana] quoted locals who spotted her last in Lama Hotel area as saying. According to him, police has been investigating the case of Aubreys disappearance with the help of locals.

Villagers in LNP area refuted Sacco family claims of hiding information about Aubrey. We are keeping our eyes and ears open to trace her in the areas, Norbu Tamang one of the hoteliers in the Lama Hotel area said. Villagers are also searching for her, he added. In his 35-year-long hotel business experience, he said such an incident has not ever been heard of before.

Rasuwa villagers always take good care of any foreigner in trouble, Raju Titung of Dhunche area said echoing Tamang. Most of the villagers rely on tourism for their survival here so nobody even thinks of harming tourists, he said adding that villagers are sharing all the information they have. Aubreys disappearance worries us a lot too, he said.

In DMs case, however, the violence of her death suggests that some person or group had an intense hatred for her or something that they felt she represented. As a volunteer teacher and tourist, she surely had intended no offense.

In some parts of the world, people feel that their traditional culture is under siege.

Regarding a movement in the Emirates to establish an official dress code for all citizens and foreign visitors in public areas:
http://apnews.myway.com/article/20120706/D9VR8CDG1.html


"I think in an increasingly tumultuous region and in an era of powerful and often intrusive globalizing forces, citizens of the UAE are increasingly concerned that their traditions and core values are being eroded," said Christopher Davidson, an expert on Gulf affairs at Britain's Durham University.

"In some senses, it is a grassroots reaction to authorities and leaders that have for many years done little to check this erosion," he added. "We've seen reactions to alcohol, so now we are seeing a reaction to immodest dress."

Jalal Bin Thaneya, an Emirati activist who has embraced the dress code campaign, said it is a way for Emiratis to show they are concerned about the loss of traditions.

Perhaps just being a young woman and traveling alone in certain areas could be taken as a radical feminist statement, or maybe as a type of Western cultural imperialism.

Say DM just talked to some young girls about going to college. Or didn't dress in the right way.

And another consideration is that one may be perfectly law-abiding and considerate tourist in a place where other tourists take advantage of the situation, and indulge in drug abuse, wild late-night partying and other disrespectable activities.

From UK Daily Mail on-line, comment regarding disappearance of UK hiker Zis Souflatika.


I was in nepal in 2010 .. i got offered drugs at the top of a mountain, sarankhot ... in kathmandu you get offered drugs every 100 yards often by sinister looking fellas in ski masks. In pokhara (nice lakeside town with no drug dealers on the streets) where we got stranded for 12 days because there was a strike which meant the only way out was by flying not roads, i went on a four hour walk to the un-aptly named peace pagoda .. interestingly the guide book stated ... "You may be mugged on this walk" Nepal isnt thailand ..... where people are mostly very friendly .... even in the rural areas .... nepal is very commericialised a beer in thailand will cost you 50p in nepal though the economy is even poorer it will cost you 1.70 ...... one place i got a beer that cost me the same as my nights rent ... Funny place an experience but id go for northern thailand any day of the week, cheaper, friendlier, safer oh and while i was there an american hiker went missing ... !!!!!

Walker
07-09-2012, 02:01 PM
Now defunct link: http://www.pioneerlocal.com/elmwoodpark/news/2514582,franklin-park-aubrey-072210-s1.article



On April 20, Aubrey Sacco e-mailed her parents that she was going to hike through the Langtang Valley.

"She just said she was leaving for the trail in the morning and there was no Internet or phones in the mountains and she would contact us when she got back from the trek," Connie Sacco said.

Her trek was supposed to take 10 days. She mentioned there were side trails that she might check out and her parents didn't start to worry until May 4 or 5 when they still hadn't heard from her.

"I started making some phone calls," Sacco said. "We learned that the Maoists had a strike in Katmandu. It literally shut down the entire country. All transportation was stopped. Everyone we talked to said just hold out, she was probably in the mountains and just couldn't get back."

The side trails should be noted. Some hikers complain that the main trail is sometimes hard to follow due to mudslides. A side trail may not even be on the maps.

AS herself wrote the e-mail from inside the park. Either Hotel Namaste has a computer for guest use, or she borrowed a laptop from another hiker.

The source of the following information about Langtang National Park is the book Lonely Planet Trekking in the Nepal Himalayas. AS is said to have been using one of the Lonely Planet guides.

If you continue upwards from Lama Hotel, you come to the Riverside Hotel at Gumnachouk, then an area known as Ghora Tabela, where many hikers stop for lunch.

Ghora Tabela was once a Tibetan resettlement camp, but the Nepali army now uses it as a national park post. (The Nepali army is in charge of policing Langtang National Park (LNP)). This location is particularly scenic, and there are two lodges there, but no permanent inhabitants except the lodge operators.

Just beyond Ghora Tabela is an army check-in station for hikers. And, a helipad.

AS never checked in at GT.

Vehicles are not used on the mountain. Supplies are brought in by helicopter. Also, tourists commonly rent helicopters.

The army may have called most of its troops into Katmandu to contain the riots; therefore, the fact that AS did not sign in at GT doesnt necessarily prove that she never got that far.

I dont want to bring up a possibility which some people may find highly offensive, but could AS have been inducted into a cult or cult-like group?

One characteristic of cults is that they isolate the inductee from their friends and family. Could AS have been manipulated somehow to go to the remote wilderness location without her camera, cell, laptop, and credit card, all which could be used to trace her?

ASs refusing a guide is also a bit puzzling. Her claim that she will be entirely unavailable by internet for the duration of her itinerary is just not true. Wanting to go on side trails alone into the wilderness makes no sense, unless she (or someone influencing her) is just trying to buy time.

Say the plan was to meet someone at the helipad, who would take her to some other location. In this case, AS actually disappeared from that other location, which may explain why repeated searches of the trail and areas near the trail have reportedly turned up no evidence.

Walker
07-10-2012, 02:44 PM
Blog entry April 15, 2010:


On April 4th, I set out for a journey up North, a 4 day train journey which would take me up to Himalayas (with a brief stop in Kolatta). And now writing this I cant say I regret a minute of the 45 hour train ride. Thankfully I had the time to do it, now if I were only here for a few weeks that may be a different story. Many fellow travelers and yoga students tried to persuade me into just hopping on a plane and getting up north in a few hours. But why skip out on such an adventure? By taking a plane I knew I would pass over so much! So I spent my time next to the train window witnessing the everyday rural life from South India, to North India, from Palm Trees to Pine Trees. What my friends had seen as boring, is completely and utterly inspiring to me.

AS has a defensive tone in this passage.

Now we all have traveled, and made travel friends, but how often do the "friends" make a big deal about where you are going next, and how you will get there? She was annoyed by their attitude; even implying that they are philistines. The conflict may have come as an unpleasant surprise.

Most travelers would prefer the train for the reasons AS describes.

AS's original intention was to visit first Sri Lanka, and then India. She had had no previous plan to go to neighboring Nepal.

Of course, the train is not as comfortable as a US train, but yet she finds the trip enjoyable.

The friends were more likely Westerners, since AS would not be so offended were an Indian to call the train ride boring. She would just think that of course there would be no novelty in such a trip for him.

Possibly some group was pressuring AS to go to Nepal as quickly as possible.

Walker
07-11-2012, 07:54 PM
Interesting discussion on the Lonely Planet forum regarding Zis Souflatika and others missing in Nepal:

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/thread.jspa?threadID=2215813&start=45

Shows article appearing a magazine called Grazia:

http://imgur.com/a/VOEPf

Not really sure what they mean by "gap year" killer, though. Maybe young Europeans are being encouraged by their colleges and universities to take a year away from their regular academic programs to visit underdeveloped countries alone?

In any case, seems unlikely that all of these individuals were harmed by the exact same person or group.

SeaEclipse
07-11-2012, 11:33 PM
Interesting discussion on the Lonely Planet forum regarding Zis Souflatika and others missing in Nepal:

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/thread.jspa?threadID=2215813&start=45

Shows article appearing a magazine called Grazia:

http://imgur.com/a/VOEPf

Not really sure what they mean by "gap year" killer, though. Maybe young Europeans are being encouraged by their colleges and universities to take a year away from their regular academic programs to visit underdeveloped countries alone?

In any case, seems unlikely that all of these individuals were harmed by the exact same person or group.

"Gap year" is the year between high school and uni that many British kids traditionally take off to travel. Often they'll work for half a year to fund travel in the other half; alternatively, they do some volunteer/charity-type thing abroad. Africa and the Far East are the most common destinations -- both for their exoticness and their affordability.

Walker
07-15-2012, 04:01 PM
http://www.idahostatesman.com/2012/07/02/2176297/graduates-go-and-have-an-epic.html


The Fulbright fellowship program, linked with the U.S. State Department, is a massive enterprise that's open to recent graduates, YOUNG professionals and others. If you're lucky enough to be graduating from a small private college, you might have a chance at a Watson Fellowship - a yearlong grant to pay for independent study and travel OUTSIDE the U.S. The Thomas J. Watson Foundation offers about 40 of these a year ...
If you're up for serious service, the Peace Corps typically seeks a 27-month commitment [to risking your life] abroad.

Note: emphasis mine.



The US government with its auxiliary politically-motivated foundations is promoting this whole idea of the idealistic young American woman alone in the underdeveloped country as "pro-democracy" and "egalitarian" propaganda. In certain regions, this arrangement sets them up as targets of resentment.

Similarly, idealistic Christian missionaries were used by imperialist powers in the nineteenth & early twentieth century. Though usually associated with and protected by large religious organizations, they were also frequently targets of resentment.

No young Americans should be encouraged to visit these countries without full support both from the US and from the people in the area they will be traveling.

If the US State Department played any role in influencing AS to go over there alone, then the US State Department is responsible for bringing her back, or at least resolving the issue of what happened to her --- no matter how much it costs.


The State Dept should also reimburse Nepal for all of their efforts on ASs behalf.

If one penny for AS's trips to Costa Rico, Thailand or this South Asia trip came from the US government or a foundation, the family may have strong grounds for a lawsuit. Even the European victims and their families could possibly sue, since the US State Dept is supposed to be a world leadership organization.

All victims and families of victims could join together in a class action lawsuit against the US State Department for taking advantage of young people, and failing to notify them of potential dangers, esp. the danger of being in an isolated situation.

tarabull
07-19-2012, 02:51 PM
New Album Finding Aubrey Available on ITunes

Contains several never before heard songs written by Aubrey

More info and links to the download are available here: http://aubreysacco.com/MakeLove2Life/home.html

tarabull
07-19-2012, 04:20 PM
... providing women guides and assistants for women trekkers.

http://www.3sistersadventure.com/

Walker
07-22-2012, 03:26 AM
Trekking in Nepal with Rob Steele
Trekking in Langtang Park Part 3

Trekking in Langtang Part Three. - YouTube

Uploaded by robthetrekker on May 13, 2010

Trekking in Langtang, Part Three - Lama Hotel to Langtang, Two short days trekking with an overnight stop at Ghoratabela (GT).

1:57 GT
2:42 Terrain becomes much more rugged, and challenging.
2:44 The helipad.
2:53 The checkpoint for tourists run by the Nepali Army.

Walker
07-23-2012, 06:21 PM
An unconfirmed sighting of AS was reported on May 11, 2010 near Langtang Village. Not sure if this report has been completely discounted.

http://www.michellesigona.com/2010/05/international-missing-case/

Seems that it would be unlikely for AS to hike as far as Langtang Village, but yet be seen by no one since she had left Lama Hotel.


However, if she left via helicopter from Ghora Tabela (GT) to some other location, the lack of witnesses could be explained.

The first length of her planned journey home, her return flight from Katmandu to Sri Lanka, had been scheduled for May 15.

GrainneDhu
08-25-2012, 11:38 AM
I just read the following story and thought of Aubrey Sacco:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17630703

It's about attacks on humans by tigers and leopards in Nepal. A quick check of Wikipedia says that tigers sometimes drag their kills into heavy vegetation to hide:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiger#Hunting_and_diet

A check of Wikipedia on leopards says they sometimes drag their kills into trees to hide them:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopard#Hunting_and_diet

It seems like there were plenty of natural dangers for a single person trekking in Nepal.

Walker
08-26-2012, 07:24 PM
I just read the following story and thought of Aubrey Sacco:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17630703

It's about attacks on humans by tigers and leopards in Nepal. A quick check of Wikipedia says that tigers sometimes drag their kills into heavy vegetation to hide:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiger#Hunting_and_diet

A check of Wikipedia on leopards says they sometimes drag their kills into trees to hide them:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopard#Hunting_and_diet

It seems like there were plenty of natural dangers for a single person trekking in Nepal.

Quote from the BBC link:

The Champawat Tigress is reported to have killed about 200 men and women before being driven out of Nepal into what is now the state of Uttarakhand in northern India.

She continued to kill there, and her total number of human victims was estimated at 430.

430! victims. She was finally killed by a hunter in 1907.



Quote from the Wiki article on tigers:

After killing their prey, tigers sometimes drag their prey to conceal it in vegetative coverage, usually pulling it by grasping with their mouths at the site of the killing bite (on the throat in large prey, on the nape in smaller prey). This too can require great physical strength. In one case, after it had killed an adult gaur, [an animal similar to a buffalo] a tiger was observed to drag the massive carcass over a distance of 12 m (39 ft). When 13 men simultaneously tried to drag the same carcass later, they were unable to move it.

Certainly, that AS fell victim to a predatory animal like a tiger is a distinct possibility.

However, one fact that might suggest otherwise is that according to media reports absolutely none of her belongings were found. No pack, no clothing, no jewelry, no bandanna, nothing.

[Note: In the video I posted, dated May 2010 which was shortly after AS disappeared, the people are wearing windbreakers and hoodies at Ghora Tabela (which is spelled many different ways)].

No coat, no sweatshirt, no hiking boots. Nothing at all was found, at least according to what facts have been released to the public.

An animal would not bother to cover its tracks, or hide or destroy evidence. If AS were attacked by a leopard or tiger on the trail, she would likely have been injured immediately, and bleeding profusely. Dogs could follow that trail of blood for more than a year after the attack, but yet the search dogs apparently came up with nothing.

Plus, a hungry animal probably wouldn't bother dragging the prey any huge distance from the killing location; maybe more like a few hundred yards maximum, certainly not miles.

AS may have seen an animal, and taken flight into the woods. She may then have become hopelessly lost, and died from exposure or other predators far from the trail. In this case, however, the dogs would still likely have been able to find her.

On another board, (sorry, lost link), a poster suggested that AS was the victim of tiger poachers, who may have feared that she would report their illegal activities to the authorities. However, why would poachers be attracted to a popular tourist trail right near an army base? Doesn't seem like it would be a convenient route to smuggle tiger skins. On the other hand, maybe criminals were somehow trying to take advantage of the fact that the army station may have been understaffed due to the riots in Katmandu. Still AS would not likely have seemed any threat.

The local police have blamed a "criminal group" for AS's disappearance. In some US national parks, criminal gangs have actually seized territory and set up marihuana farms. Gang members will shoot at unsuspecting hikers who happen along.

Is it at all possible that Nepal has the same problem? With the territory so vast, and the fresh water and wildlife so abundant, communities of squatters could easily sustain themselves far back in the woods. They could be criminal gangs, or cults, hippies or social dropouts or people just sick of Western civilization or any combination. If they live very far back, even the local people may not know of them. Maybe they use the helicopter to obtain whatever they need from the outside world. Or maybe they live in a location which can only be accessed by helicopter.

AS may have been intrigued by the thought of visiting a cult living in an abandoned village far in the Himalayan wilderness. Say she arranged to meet someone at the helipad who would give her a ride to this location. Once she arrived there, maybe she was unable to return, or the group brainwashed her into joining.

GrainneDhu
08-27-2012, 02:09 PM
Certainly, that AS fell victim to a predatory animal like a tiger is a distinct possibility.

However, one fact that might suggest otherwise is that according to media reports absolutely none of her belongings were found. No pack, no clothing, no jewelry, no bandanna, nothing.

[Note: In the video I posted, dated May 2010 which was shortly after AS disappeared, the people are wearing windbreakers and hoodies at Ghora Tabela (which is spelled many different ways)].

No coat, no sweatshirt, no hiking boots. Nothing at all was found, at least according to what facts have been released to the public.

An animal would not bother to cover its tracks, or hide or destroy evidence. If AS were attacked by a leopard or tiger on the trail, she would likely have been injured immediately, and bleeding profusely. Dogs could follow that trail of blood for more than a year after the attack, but yet the search dogs apparently came up with nothing.

Plus, a hungry animal probably wouldn't bother dragging the prey any huge distance from the killing location; maybe more like a few hundred yards maximum, certainly not miles.

Depends on the terrain, I think. If a leopard dragged her up into a tree overhanging a precipice, her belongings may not be easily accessible by humans.

It reminds me a bit of Azaria Chamberlain. The only thing found was a little knitted jacket that she was wearing the night she was killed by a dingo.


AS may have seen an animal, and taken flight into the woods. She may then have become hopelessly lost, and died from exposure or other predators far from the trail. In this case, however, the dogs would still likely have been able to find her.

How long after she disappeared were the dogs brought in? Where were those dogs trained?

Terrain and familiarity can count when it comes to dogs, even highly qualified dog/handler teams.


On another board, (sorry, lost link), a poster suggested that AS was the victim of tiger poachers, who may have feared that she would report their illegal activities to the authorities. However, why would poachers be attracted to a popular tourist trail right near an army base? Doesn't seem like it would be a convenient route to smuggle tiger skins. On the other hand, maybe criminals were somehow trying to take advantage of the fact that the army station may have been understaffed due to the riots in Katmandu. Still AS would not likely have seemed any threat.

The local police have blamed a "criminal group" for AS's disappearance.

That seems awfully convenient... for the police anyway.

I find it unlikely that tiger poachers transport their illegal hides, teeth, etc, in plain sight. If AS saw a poacher in a compromising position, it would almost have to be while skinning out a kill. A tourist trail seems like an unlikely place for something like that.

On the other hand, AS may have gotten lost, taken a turn away from the trail without realising it or saw something inviting off the trail and thought it wouldn't hurt to go a little way off the trail to see it. She may not have realised just how easy it is for someone in a new environment to get totally lost within 20 feet of a trail. Even someone experienced hiking in other environments can easily get lost when in a whole different environment.


AS may have been intrigued by the thought of visiting a cult living in an abandoned village far in the Himalayan wilderness. Say she arranged to meet someone at the helipad who would give her a ride to this location. Once she arrived there, maybe she was unable to return, or the group brainwashed her into joining.

Maybe.

I don't recall the list of places she'd stayed at previously but I do recall my impression was that they were pretty mainstream. The sort of places that tourists go that let them say "when I stayed at an ashram..." without realising that said ashram is about as authentic an experience as staying at a local B&B would be in the US. It is authentic but not, perhaps, in the way they think.

Walker
08-27-2012, 03:25 PM
How long after she disappeared were the dogs brought in? Where were those dogs trained?

This quotation is from an article by David Lohr for AOL News dated May 20, 2010:


Barry [Sacco family spokesperson] said authorities have confirmed that Sacco made it to two different check-in stations along the Langtang Valley trail, but whatever happened to her after that remains a mystery.

"Not long after she set out on the trail, there was a strike with dangerous protests," Barry said. "There were no phones, no transportation and no way for her to get back in touch with her parents. We think she turned around and went back up to the trail, but nobody has heard from her. We don't know if she got lost or if somebody kidnapped her. There are really no answers."

When Sacco failed to make contact with her family by May 4, [they] contacted the U.S. Embassy in Nepal and requested assistance. In response, the embassy began working with the Nepal government, the tourism board and local police. Several search parties were dispatched to the area, but no sign of Sacco was found.

Concerns for her safety were heightened on May 15, when she failed to make her return flight back to the U.S. In response, her father, Paul Sacco, along with her brother Crofton and Barry's nephew, Dinesh Shakya, an expert on Langtang National Park, decided to fly to Nepal to help in the search.

"We feel we've done as much as we can from our little control center at our home, and now we feel it's important to be on the ground and actually be talking with the people who are coordinating the search," Paul Sacco said in a May 17 interview with CBS4denver.com.

According to Barry, the men landed in Nepal on Wednesday, where they were met by representatives of Nepal's U.S. Embassy.

"They called last night [May 16] to give us an update," Barry said. "They said the Nepalese Army has search crews with dogs out on the trails, and U.N. advisers have also joined that team. They are supposed to be getting helicopters up for the search today."

Barry said concerns over another possible strike have led the Saccos to contact outside resources. As a result, several search and recovery teams from all over the world are heading to Nepal to assist in the search.

"We want to be prepared, because this next strike is supposed to bring some heavy-duty clashes," Barry said.

The search request was sent to the US embassy on May 4, and search parties were dispatched to the area.

On May 16, 2010, that is 24 days after AS's disappearance, the US Embassy reported to her father that the Nepali Army had search parties with dogs out on the trails.

Maybe we put too much faith in dogs. Certainly they have worked wonders in other missing person cases. Still they should have been able to find something after less than four weeks.

Haven't found any media mention of how the dogs were trained. Hopefully with so many hikers in Nepal, the government or private agencies provide quality training for the search and rescue dogs.

Walker
08-27-2012, 03:48 PM
I don't recall the list of places she'd stayed at previously but I do recall my impression was that they were pretty mainstream. The sort of places that tourists go that let them say "when I stayed at an ashram..." without realising that said ashram is about as authentic an experience as staying at a local B&B would be in the US. It is authentic but not, perhaps, in the way they think.

Nepal was not on her itinerary. At some point while staying in Mysore, she suddenly decided to go north, to Calcutta, then to Katmandu, which is popular with the Western college crowd.
In my opinion, she may have been disappointed with her teaching experience, and bored, and seeking other young people like herself to have some fun before going back home. Langtang is very popular with Coloradans, and maybe she hoped to find some old college pals there.

Although her destinations seem within the tourist mainstream, she could have fallen under the influence of someone who persuaded her to go north. She had an attraction to personalities held to be charismatic: she belonged to Sri Sri Ravi Shankar's Art of Living, and greatly admired Mooji.

Her determination to go alone may have had some purpose. Fathers quote re solo trekking:

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2010-05-31/south-asia/28316761_1_nepal-authorities-everest-region-remote-district



Paul Sacco says he was unaware of the disappearances till he came to Nepal to search for his missing daughter. "I did not want her to travel alone," he says dolefully. "I would have liked her to travel with a guide and we had many arguments over that. She said she was 23 and an adult. The journey was meant to be a voyage of self-discovery that was her philosophy."

Her repeated refusal of a guide therefore had nothing to do with being short of money. Maybe someone told her to meet them at some point along the trail, and to be alone.

Walker
08-27-2012, 03:56 PM
Depends on the terrain, I think. If a leopard dragged her up into a tree overhanging a precipice, her belongings may not be easily accessible by humans.

US tourists prefer bright colors, though. Someone would notice a pack, jacket, and other things in a tree. This trail is very popular in season. But, you are right, it's not impossible that her belongings are there but simply not found.

Walker
08-27-2012, 04:05 PM
It reminds me a bit of Azaria Chamberlain. The only thing found was a little knitted jacket that she was wearing the night she was killed by a dingo.


Azaria Chamberlain was a baby, though. The tragic story from Wiki article entitled "Azaria Chamberlain Disappearance":



Azaria Chantel Loren Chamberlain (11 June 1980 in Mount Isa, Queensland, Australia – 17 August 1980) was an Australian baby girl who was killed by a dingo on the night of 17 August 1980, on a family camping trip to Uluru (also known as Ayers Rock) in the Northern Territory. Her body was never found. Her parents, Lindy and Michael Chamberlain, reported that she had been taken from their tent by a dingo, but Lindy was tried for murder and spent more than three years in prison. She was released when a piece of Azaria's clothing was found in a dingo lair. New inquests were opened. In 2012, 32 years after Azaria's death, the Chamberlains' version of events was confirmed by a coroner.

Walker
08-27-2012, 07:07 PM
On the other hand, AS may have gotten lost, taken a turn away from the trail without realising it or saw something inviting off the trail and thought it wouldn't hurt to go a little way off the trail to see it. She may not have realised just how easy it is for someone in a new environment to get totally lost within 20 feet of a trail. Even someone experienced hiking in other environments can easily get lost when in a whole different environment.


ネパールトレッ*ング③・ラマホテ ~ランタン谷(10.4.30) - YouTube

My browsers translate program would not work properly, but this footage was apparently (my guess) taken along the Langtang trail, past Lama Hotel, where the forest thins out and tourists catch their first glimpse of the huge mountains. Dated the week after ASs disappearance it should reflect similar conditions to what AS faced.

@ 0:27 we see mountains in the distance.

Through this section of forest, ASs likely route, the trail clings to the Langtang river. To lose the trail, she would have to lose the river as well. Since it appears to be a loud rapids, she would have to venture far from the trail to get completely lost.

Since she spoke to her parents of her desire to investigate sidetrails, she may very well have gotten lost somewhere in this area. Or maybe she met up with someone with whom she had plans to take a sidetrail to visit some particular location of interest to her.

linarclud38
08-27-2012, 07:38 PM
It is now 4 months since Zisimos Souflas was last heard from and his family are distraught. The press release and missing poster contains more information.

PRESS RELEASE

UK Citizen, Zisimos Souflas still missing in Nepal
A United Kingdom (UK) citizen ZISIMOS SOUFLAS has been missing in Nepal for 4 months. He was last heard of while travelling in Mount Everest region on April 24th 2012.
His disappearance only came to light just a few days after a young Belgium Debbie Mavea, 23, was found murdered in the Himalayan Mountains. There are at least 12 other missing foreign tourist cases in Nepal.
Zisimos was reported missing on May 15 by his family when he failed to get his return flight to Manchester Airport. The Foreign & Commonwealth Office, through the British Embassy in Kathmandu, South Yorkshire Police Missing Persons Unit, Interpol, and the Nepali Police are all involved in the search for Zisimos and the authorities have not ruled out murder (The Sunday Times report).
Zisimos is a 27 year old UK national, born in Sheffield. He attended All Saints Roman Catholic High School in Sheffield, Sixth Form at Gordonstoun School and graduated from St Andrews University in Scotland 2010.
The primary purpose of his visit to Nepal was to attend the wedding of a school friend in Kathmandu, and to do some voluntary work, using his final few weeks in Nepal to visit Sagarmatha National Park and Everest Base Camp.
According to the press release issued from the British Embassy in Kathmandu Zisimos it is believed he entered Sagarmatha National Park , Khumbu Region on 23rd April 2012, from where he was planning to go to Everest Base Camp. Zisimos stayed at the Hotel Tibet in Namche Bazaar, where climbers start their walk to the Everest base camp. The graduate left belongings at Hotel Tibet in Namche Bazaar on April 24, promising to return for them in a few days. No one has heard from him since this time.
Local guides and Sherpas have searched all the paths he could have taken which are said to be well marked out. Weather conditions at the time were good so his disappearance remains a complete mystery.

Zisimoss family and friends are very grateful to all the Nepali people who have given generously of their time and resources in the search for Zisimos. The search to date has not been successful and we are appealing more widely for information from anybody who may have seen him from April onwards to get in touch. Also if people could communicate about Zisimos with mountaineering friends who might have been there, or know other people who have gone trekking in the Himalayas, if they have seen or heard anything..
The new trekking season will soon be starting. We would like to ask anyone who is planning to go to Nepal if they would like to take some missing posters with them to help to extend and assist us with the search. If anyone would like to help with the search, please contact sophie_souflas@hotmail.com and / or see page searching for Zisimos

If you have any information, please contact:
The Foreign & Commonwealth Office, London, contact: Kerry Morris: tel: 0207 008 0227, email : kerry.morris@fco.gov.uk
OR
Missing Person: reference KX/2863/2012, South Yorkshire Police.


MIssing Poster

ZISIMOS SOUFLAS has been missing now since April 24th, the date he was last seen in Namche Bazar. He had stayed at the Hotel Tibet in Namche on the night of the 23rd, and left there on the 24th to go to Everest Base Camp. He has not been seen since.
Prior to this he left Kathmandu on the 18th April. He took a bus to Jiri, and walked from there to Namche, checking in to the Sagarmatha National Park on 23rd April.
If you have any information please contact:
Chakra Karki : tel: 9741070619 email: karki.ck@gmail.com
British Embassy: email: BEKathmandu@fco.gov.uk
Sophie Souflas: email : sophie_souflas@hotmail.com

There is a REWARD for information which leads to his safe return.

Walker
08-27-2012, 09:23 PM
It is now 4 months since Zisimos Souflas was last heard from and his family are distraught. The press release and missing poster contains more information.

PRESS RELEASE

UK Citizen, Zisimos Souflas still missing in Nepal
A United Kingdom (UK) citizen ZISIMOS SOUFLAS has been missing in Nepal for 4 months. He was last heard of while travelling in Mount Everest region on April 24th 2012.
His disappearance only came to light just a few days after a young Belgium Debbie Mavea, 23, was found murdered in the Himalayan Mountains. There are at least 12 other missing foreign tourist cases in Nepal.
Zisimos was reported missing on May 15 by his family when he failed to get his return flight to Manchester Airport. The Foreign & Commonwealth Office, through the British Embassy in Kathmandu, South Yorkshire Police Missing Persons Unit, Interpol, and the Nepali Police are all involved in the search for Zisimos and the authorities have not ruled out murder (The Sunday Times report).
Zisimos is a 27 year old UK national, born in Sheffield. He attended All Saints Roman Catholic High School in Sheffield, Sixth Form at Gordonstoun School and graduated from St Andrews University in Scotland 2010.
The primary purpose of his visit to Nepal was to attend the wedding of a school friend in Kathmandu, and to do some voluntary work, using his final few weeks in Nepal to visit Sagarmatha National Park and Everest Base Camp.
According to the press release issued from the British Embassy in Kathmandu Zisimos it is believed he entered Sagarmatha National Park , Khumbu Region on 23rd April 2012, from where he was planning to go to Everest Base Camp. Zisimos stayed at the Hotel Tibet in Namche Bazaar, where climbers start their walk to the Everest base camp. The graduate left belongings at Hotel Tibet in Namche Bazaar on April 24, promising to return for them in a few days. No one has heard from him since this time.
Local guides and Sherpas have searched all the paths he could have taken which are said to be well marked out. Weather conditions at the time were good so his disappearance remains a complete mystery.

Zisimoss family and friends are very grateful to all the Nepali people who have given generously of their time and resources in the search for Zisimos. The search to date has not been successful and we are appealing more widely for information from anybody who may have seen him from April onwards to get in touch. Also if people could communicate about Zisimos with mountaineering friends who might have been there, or know other people who have gone trekking in the Himalayas, if they have seen or heard anything..
The new trekking season will soon be starting. We would like to ask anyone who is planning to go to Nepal if they would like to take some missing posters with them to help to extend and assist us with the search. If anyone would like to help with the search, please contact sophie_souflas@hotmail.com and / or see page searching for Zisimos

If you have any information, please contact:
The Foreign & Commonwealth Office, London, contact: Kerry Morris: tel: 0207 008 0227, email : kerry.morris@fco.gov.uk
OR
Missing Person: reference KX/2863/2012, South Yorkshire Police.


MIssing Poster

ZISIMOS SOUFLAS has been missing now since April 24th, the date he was last seen in Namche Bazar. He had stayed at the Hotel Tibet in Namche on the night of the 23rd, and left there on the 24th to go to Everest Base Camp. He has not been seen since.
Prior to this he left Kathmandu on the 18th April. He took a bus to Jiri, and walked from there to Namche, checking in to the Sagarmatha National Park on 23rd April.
If you have any information please contact:
Chakra Karki : tel: 9741070619 email: karki.ck@gmail.com
British Embassy: email: BEKathmandu@fco.gov.uk
Sophie Souflas: email : sophie_souflas@hotmail.com

There is a REWARD for information which leads to his safe return.

The above post doesn't mention search dogs. Hopefully they have been tried. Sounds as though Souflas may not have even made it to the trail. Strange that the calendar dates are so close to the same calendar dates that AS disappeared.

Is it possible that the volunteer work is misunderstood by the local people as being politically motivated? AS, Malveau, and Souflas all did some type of volunteering. The economy is down in the US and Europe, and young people need professional experience to develop the qualifications for a decent job at home. Volunteer work may seem to them as the ideal way to combine interesting travel, credential-building and actually helping needy students at the same time. The state of Nepal is however in political turmoil, and any sort of foreign intervention is likely to be regarded with mistrust.

Malveau's murder was determined to have been motivated by neither rape nor robbery.

Article: "Nepal Becoming a Bermuda Triangle for Tourists?"

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2010-05-31/south-asia/28316761_1_nepal-authorities-everest-region-remote-district


German Sabine Gruneklee and Celine Henry from France went missing after they entered the Nagarjuna forest on the outskirts of Kathmandu valley on separate days in 2005. Although Gruneklee's body was found a year later, the 32-year-old French volunteer, who closely resembled Arundhati Roy, is still listed as missing.

Ms. Roy is of both Indian and Syrian descent. She is very outspoken on a large number of issues, but the most pertinent issue here would be the Maoist movement, which she supports.

Quote from Wiki article on Arundhati Roy:


Roy has criticised Government's armed actions against the Naxalite-Maoist insurgents in India, calling it "war on the poorest people in the country". According to her, the Government has "abdicated its responsibility to the people"[53] and launched the offensive against Naxals to aid the corporations with whom it has signed Memorandums of Understanding.[54] While she has received support from various quarters for her views,[55] Roy's description of the Maoists as "Gandhians" raised a controversy.[56][57] In other statements, she has described Naxalites as "patriot of a kind"[58] who are "fighting to implement the Constitution, (while) the government is vandalising it".[53] Many commentators have hypothesized that Roy does not hold sympathy for the victims of Maoist terrorism[59][60] and have called her a "Maoist sympathiser."

The Times of India probably did not mean to imply that Ms. Henry came to harm just because she looked like Ms. Roy, or that this factor played any role in her disappearance. However, if she had even in the slightest way seemed to support a certain political perspective, and additionally strongly resembled a political figure resented by certain groups, could these circumstances have triggered a crime against her?

tarabull
08-27-2012, 09:36 PM
There's a new [August 17] update [ www.abreysacco.com ] on the search efforts page:

snipped...A week ago the Nepal government announced, in another unusual move, that all solo trekking was banned. Although many are skeptical of the government's intentions and their ability to exercise quality control over required guides, which are rumored to also be responsible for frequent attacks on their female clients, we cannot help but think this new rule was in part Aubrey-driven and at least a step in the right direction.

LOTS more to read here: http://aubreysacco.com/MakeLove2Life/Search_Update.html

Walker
08-27-2012, 10:23 PM
According to the press release issued from the British Embassy in Kathmandu Zisimos it is believed he entered Sagarmatha National Park , Khumbu Region on 23rd April 2012, from where he was planning to go to Everest Base Camp. Zisimos stayed at the Hotel Tibet in Namche Bazaar, where climbers start their walk to the Everest base camp. The graduate left belongings at Hotel Tibet in Namche Bazaar on April 24, promising to return for them in a few days. No one has heard from him since this time.
Local guides and Sherpas have searched all the paths he could have taken which are said to be well marked out. Weather conditions at the time were good so his disappearance remains a complete mystery.

http://wikitravel.org/en/Namche_Bazaar


The village is located on crescent shaped mountain slopes that offer stunning views of the mountains across the valley. It is a grueling 3 to 4 hour climb up from the river to Namche, and at 3,500 meters, it is possible to suffer altitude sickness here. Therefore, it is advisable to spend at least two nights in the village to acclimatize.

Souflas may have suffered altitude sickness, which may have impaired his judgment, leading him far away from the trail.

Walker
08-28-2012, 03:39 AM
According to the press release issued from the British Embassy in Kathmandu Zisimos it is believed he entered Sagarmatha National Park , Khumbu Region on 23rd April 2012, from where he was planning to go to Everest Base Camp. Zisimos stayed at the Hotel Tibet in Namche Bazaar, where climbers start their walk to the Everest base camp. The graduate left belongings at Hotel Tibet in Namche Bazaar on April 24, promising to return for them in a few days.

Maybe he realized that he had altitude sickness, and therefore decided to descend. He left belongings to minimize weight. He should have sought assistance immediately.

diamond12
08-28-2012, 04:45 AM
There's a new [August 17] update [ www.abreysacco.com ] on the search efforts page:

snipped...A week ago the Nepal government announced, in another unusual move, that all solo trekking was banned. Although many are skeptical of the government's intentions and their ability to exercise quality control over required guides, which are rumored to also be responsible for frequent attacks on their female clients, we cannot help but think this new rule was in part Aubrey-driven and at least a step in the right direction.

LOTS more to read here: http://aubreysacco.com/MakeLove2Life/Search_Update.html

BBM

Guides rumored to be responsible of attacks? Was this mentioned before or have I been missing it? I read all posts and articles on this thread, but I might have skipped that by mistake.

Is there any other country (where trekking is popular) where so many tourists went missing? While natural elements/animals or getting lost might be responsible for some of the disappearances, I feel it can't be the reason for all the missing people in Nepal.

GrainneDhu
08-28-2012, 05:12 AM
This quotation is from an article by David Lohr for AOL News dated May 20, 2010:



The search request was sent to the US embassy on May 4, and search parties were dispatched to the area.

On May 16, 2010, that is 24 days after AS's disappearance, the US Embassy reported to her father that the Nepali Army had search parties with dogs out on the trails.

Maybe we put too much faith in dogs. Certainly they have worked wonders in other missing person cases. Still they should have been able to find something after less than four weeks.

Haven't found any media mention of how the dogs were trained. Hopefully with so many hikers in Nepal, the government or private agencies provide quality training for the search and rescue dogs.

Um. The US record for a dog trailing a live human being is 5.5 days. That is, the human being was at the point last seen 5.5 days before the Bloodhound was taken to the scene.

In my own experience, the oldest trail successfully worked was by the mother and brother of one of my own dogs, working in tandem with their handler. It was Louisiana in the summer, the temps were hot and way humid, so she would work one dog while leaving the other to cool off and re-hydrate, then she would work the other dog. Working like that, they figured out a trail that was over 80 hours old. This was confirmed by the victim, who was an elderly man who was not lost but was making a point to his granddaughter that he did not need to go into assisted living. He was an old Cajun and he deliberately laid a trail that a lifetime of hunting experience told him would be tough for dogs to figure out.

I don't know any reputable handler who would expect to get results on a trail older than a week. They would try but they would be certain to make it clear that a lack of results would have no real meaning.

As for finding something, it depends on what and how the dogs were trained for. Dogs that have been trained for live searches sometimes indicate human remains but they don't always. Dogs trained exclusively for human remains detection do not indicate on scent left by a live human. Dogs that are cross trained indicate on both, of course.

Training and handling a high level SAR or HRD dog amounts to taking on a full time job. They need all the things that the average house dog needs, plus an exercise program aimed at keeping them in condition equivalent to a human marathon runner, plus several scent training problems a week.

In the US, all that is mostly provided by volunteers, who not only volunteer their training time but often pay for travel, room and board while deployed.

I have no idea how Nepal organises the training of their dog/handler teams. It is certainly a nontrivial expense, no matter who foots the bill.

Even highly qualified dog/handler teams can make mistakes. I don't know a single SAR dog handler who hasn't had the experience of clearing an area only to find out that the victim was in the area cleared.

So using dogs is like certain medical tests. A positive is a positive but a negative doesn't mean anything more than that a specific dog/handler team did not find anything in the area searched.

GrainneDhu
08-28-2012, 05:33 AM
Azaria Chamberlain was a baby, though. The tragic story from Wiki article entitled "Azaria Chamberlain Disappearance":

I'm very familiar with the Azaria Chamberlain case, having followed it since the mid-80s.

I think there's a chance that AS was killed by a large predator that dragged her body off the trail or AS ventured off the trail for some reason and was killed by a large predator. In combination with the rugged terrain, I think there's a chance that, if she was killed in such a way, whatever remains of her body and possessions were left are in some place inaccessible to humans.

Using the buddy system is not only a good idea because it helps soothe worried parents. There are lots of good reasons to use the buddy system and one of the best is when venturing into rough terrain, no matter how popular a tourist attraction it is.

Ed Viesturs, the famous mountain climber, tells an anecdote in his book
No Shortcuts to the Top: Climbing the World's 14 Highest Peaks, from his time working as a guide on Mt Rainier about a climber that passed his party on their way up. Conditions high on the mountain were icy and he called out to warn the guy. The climber scoffed and said something along the lines of "what could possibly happen, this is Mt Rainier!" Meaning that they were on a mountain that can be climbed by people who are reasonably fit who have no climbing experience at all.

Sadly, that guy slipped and fell to his death when he hit the icy portion of the trail.

linarclud38
08-28-2012, 05:11 PM
Maybe he realized that he had altitude sickness, and therefore decided to descend. He left belongings to minimize weight. He should have sought assistance immediately.

The following belongings were found at the Hotel Tibet in two clear small plastic bags in the possession of the Hotel Manager- phone, camera, credit cards, travel guide, notebook, receipts by the police in June when searching the hotels in Namche Bazar in June 2012 for Zisimos Souflas. Zisimos is not a naieve traveller and has considerable experience of travelling in many parts of the world.

The hotel manager did not report Zisimos's failure to return to the hotel "in a few days",and only when interviewed in the search foar news of Zisimos in June. His disappearance only came to light to the family when he failed to catch his return flight to the UK on May 15th 2012, when the alarm was raised with the Foreign Office and Nepali Police.

As for "should have sought assistance immediately" - altitude sickness affects people in different ways and degrees, and in this environment not necessarily in a location accessible to immediate assistance. Blaming the missing doesn't help anyone not the least the families of the missing who are struggling with their loss and lack of answers .

Walker
08-28-2012, 11:42 PM
The following belongings were found at the Hotel Tibet in two clear small plastic bags in the possession of the Hotel Manager- phone, camera, credit cards, travel guide, notebook, receipts by the police in June when searching the hotels in Namche Bazar in June 2012 for Zisimos Souflas. Zisimos is not a naieve traveller and has considerable experience of travelling in many parts of the world.


Were the small bags bundled into one big bag with other possessions, which he may have deemed unnecessary for a few days rest at a lower elevation?



The hotel manager did not report Zisimos's failure to return to the hotel "in a few days",and only when interviewed in the search foar news of Zisimos in June.

The manager may have thought that ZS didn't bother to come back because those particular belongings had no material value.



His disappearance only came to light to the family when he failed to catch his return flight to the UK on May 15th 2012, when the alarm was raised with the Foreign Office and Nepali Police.

That's very similar to what happened in the AS case.


As for "should have sought assistance immediately" - altitude sickness affects people in different ways and degrees, and in this environment not necessarily in a location accessible to immediate assistance.

This video shows a group doing the Everest Base Camp trek

Nepal Everest Base Camp Trek - YouTube

They visit Namche Bazaar also known as the "Capital of the Sherpas." Why didn't Souflas just hire a guide?

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/thread.jspa?threadID=1931196


Rates will vary depending on whether you go through an agent or hire direct, also depending on the skill and language / communication skills also have a bearing on the cost but going through a Trusted and Reliable Agent you can expect to pay $25 [per day] for a Senior Government Licenced Guide and about $20 [per day] for a Porter/Guide who will carry about 15k and speak acceptable English



Namche Bazaar (NB) is not empty wilderness, but a small town of 60 dwellings, including many hotels and restaurants, and a medical clinic. The wealthiest district in Nepal, hiking parties from all over the world come through NB continuously. Some type of assistance must have been available to ZS; hikers generally help each other out. NB also has numerous internet cafes and phone service available.

Souflas could be a crime victim, but what would be the motive?



Blaming the missing doesn't help anyone not the least the families of the missing who are struggling with their loss and lack of answers

Of course we should not blame the victim; rather we should try to understand the victim. Why did he choose to go on such an expedition alone? His family must be suffering terribly, esp. since the area is so remote, and difficult to access. They must be feeling very frustrated and helpless.

linarclud38
08-29-2012, 01:46 PM
[QUOTE=Walker;8311203]Were the small bags bundled into one big bag with other possessions, which he may have deemed unnecessary for a few days rest at a lower elevation?

ANS: No, just two small clear plastic bags


The manager may have thought that ZS didn't bother to come back because those particular belongings had no material value.

Ans:It is perceived wisdom that credit cards have a value when stolen, the phone and the camera had chargers so were usuable, and indeed a call was made after 24th April from the phone after ZS is suppose to have left the Hotel! This is being looked into!


Why didn't Souflas just hire a guide?

Ans: We don't know if he did or didn't hire a guide? It has not even been confirmed as to what his destination was when he is supposed to have left Hotel Tibet! Or whether he joined up with other trekkers, which is not uncommon.

Namche Bazaar (NB) is not empty wilderness, but a small town of 60 dwellings, including many hotels and restaurants, and a medical clinic.

Ans: A police search and enquiries have supposed to have been undertaken of NB in June, but by the time this was done it was some considerable time since his disappearcne in April. The police enquiry brought about the info taht he stayed in Hotel Tibet and a search produced his belongings ( as previously described). They were not produced voluntarily by the manager of Hotel Tibet!

The wealthiest district in Nepal, hiking parties from all over the world come through NB continuously. Some type of assistance must have been available to ZS; hikers generally help each other out

Ans: Hence our need to get the information about his disapperance spread across the world to try and find anyone who may have come into contact with him when travelling in Nepal between April and June 2012.


NB also has numerous internet cafes and phone service available.

Ans: The Nepali Police have been asked to investiaget this.


Souflas could be a crime victim, but what would be the motive?

Ans: He had a significant (in Nepali terms ) amount of cash, his passport and ????

Of course we should not blame the victim; rather we should try to understand the victim. Why did he choose to go on such an expedition alone?

Ans: Once again we don't know if he went alone or not.
The prime purpose of his trip to Nepal was to attend a school friends wedding, to assit the cataloging for an exhibition in Katmandu and then participate for a couple of weeks in a voluntary project.
The trip to Everst Base Camp via Namche was the last thread of his trip to Nepal, a once in a life time opportunity before returning to the UK and continuing working towards more international aid work, wherever that may have sent him.

His family must be suffering terribly, esp. since the area is so remote, and difficult to access. They must be feeling very frustrated and helpless.

Ans: The geography and cultural differences of Nepal is challenging. Just ask the Sacco's. We are sufferiing , we don't understand ther are so many unanswered questions but our hope and prayers are that we find some answers with the help and kindess of the good people int he world.

I hope this answers some of your questions. I will post the latest press release and missing poster on this site asap.

Walker
08-29-2012, 09:54 PM
NB also has numerous internet cafes and phone service available.

Ans: The Nepali Police have been asked to investiaget this.

You don't need to rely on the Nepali police to investigate his on-line activity or phone charges. Has the British law enforcement system offered you any assistance with the internet use aspect? Private investigators may also be helpful. Also ZC's next of kin can probably get the phone records, if any exist. Whom he called, and when, might be useful to know.

Walker
08-29-2012, 10:09 PM
Ans: Once again we don't know if he went alone or not.

Come to think of it, we don't really know for sure that AS left Lama Hotel alone, either. She also may have been carrying a certain amount of cash. Her plans were to eat and stay overnight at the little teahouses along the way.

Written about the same time as AS was also in Langtang National Park, this blog reflects anxiety about fellow hikers.

http://www.travelblog.org/Asia/Nepal/Kathmandu/Thamal/blog-492717.html

GrainneDhu
08-30-2012, 11:42 AM
There was an article on the Beeb today about the dangers of trekking in Nepal:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-18950982


Nepal's mountainous terrain - prone to natural disasters such as landslides, floods and avalanches - makes searches for missing trekkers a difficult task. There is no dedicated search and rescue unit, so this is a job for local police.

Most interesting (to me) was the brief accounts of 4 trekker/climbers who were rescued in Nepal. It really highlighted for me just how dangerous the terrain alone is. One of the people mentioned is Lincoln Hall, the climber who had to be rescued from high on Mt Everest but the other three sounded like they were ordinary trekkers who got into trouble by simply stumbling or falling on the trail and who then had to wait for rescue.

Walker
09-06-2012, 10:44 PM
Many parallels exist between AS's case and the case of Zisimos Souflas.

Link to WB thread on the ZS case:
NEW NEPAL - Zisimos Souflas, Mount Everest region, 24 April 2012 - Websleuths Crime Sleuthing Community

Dhamma Organization offers its 10-day residential meditation course all over the world.

Katmandu location.: http://www.shringa.dhamma.org/

Could be the same organization from which ZS took his meditation course. Beginners must take the 10-day course, but after the initial course, subsequent courses vary in length of stay. The first course has no fee, but at the end, those who finish the entire 10 days, are asked to make a donation towards providing the course (which includes lodging and meals) to new students.

Niall Doherty describes his experience at a Katmandu Vipassana 10-day course, and explains why he quit after two days.

Quitting Vipassana - Niall Doherty - YouTube

The classes are held at official centers run by the organization; however, in addition, courses are sometimes held at non-center sites.

Could AS have had contact with the organization or even taken one of their meditation courses while she was staying in Katmandu?

Walker
11-10-2012, 05:19 PM
I disagree. If her worries were as cited (who to talk to and what to do, etc), then that doesn't sound like intuition to me, that sounds like social anxiety. Which, in turn, leads me to think she may have been in over her head.

If she was having a lot of social anxiety, that may have de-sensitised her to true intuition of danger.

Jon Krakauer talks about this in his book Into Thin Air when he mentions experienced climbers who have avoided disaster when their inner voice told them not to go for the summit on a particular day, even though conditions seemed right. He noted that his own inner voice was never of any use because it always screamed "we're all gonna diiiieeeeeee!!!"

If Aubrey was used to experiencing such worries (as she implies by saying she was having such thoughts before she left), then she may have been so used to it that when she did meet danger, she didn't recognise the difference.

Thank you for that book recommendation. I greatly enjoyed "Into Thin Air," and I also enjoyed Krakauer's "Into the Wild." Right now, I am reading "The Climb" by Anatoli Boukreev, also excellent.

summer_breeze
12-05-2012, 12:32 PM
http://www.bayoubuzz.com/component/k2/item/191515-missing-hiker-s-dad-puts-sorrow-into-songs

Written by Media Sources
Wednesday, 05 December 2012 08:34


STORY HIGHLIGHTS Grieving over daughter's disappearance, Colorado man creates 14-song album Aubrey Sacco disappeared during hike in Nepal in 2010 Album, for sale on iTunes, includes songs from Aubrey and her father. Album is fundraiser for investigation

neverletgo
04-08-2013, 12:56 PM
:bump: for Aubrey, missing 3 years this month. :(


http://i.imgur.com/yCCQDDx.jpg
AubreySacco.com (http://www.aubreysacco.com/)

CatFancier
08-02-2013, 08:13 AM
Two arrested in case of missing Colorado hiker

http://www.9news.com/news/article/348230/71/Two-arrested-in-case-of-missing-Colorado-hiker

No Stone Unturned
08-02-2013, 08:36 AM
Hope they arrested the people responsible. With very few details available, I fear that they just arrested someone (read between the lines *anyone) in order to lay the issue to rest.

neverletgo
08-02-2013, 12:25 PM
Aubrey Sacco's father 'in shock' over news of arrests in Nepal
CU-Boulder grad vanished while on hike in 2010
By Mitchell Byars, Camera Staff Writer
Posted: 08/02/2013 05:46:23 AM MDT
Updated: 08/02/2013 07:47:07 AM MDT

Snipped:


"We're kind of in shock," Sacco's father Paul told the Daily Camera this morning in a phone interview. "We have some very good people working on this case, and when they tell me this then I'll believe it. We've learned to be very cautious about these reports.

http://www.dailycamera.com/cu-news/ci_23780373/aubrey-sacco-arrests-missing-cu-boulder-graduate

neverletgo
08-02-2013, 12:29 PM
Aubrey Sacco Nepal Disappearance: Suspects Arrested In Three Year Old Missing Trekker Cold Case

Snipped:


There arent a lot of details yet on the men or their motives. Even their names dont seem to be revealed, at least not in English media sources.

The family has visited Nepal several times to put pressure on the authorities to find out what happened to Sacco. The original case was bungled. Her father Paul Sacco himself discovered items belonging to his daughter in May 2011. They had been left in her hotel room and included a laptop that had presumably not been checked since her disappearance from the area over a year before.

http://www.**************/884060/aubrey-sacco-nepal-disappearance-suspects-arrested-in-three-year-old-missing-trekker-cold-case/

ktgirl
08-02-2013, 02:06 PM
Glad there's been some movement in this case (but like Aubrey's dad, I'm waiting for more info...and like posters here, hoping they've arrested the right people).

mikkismom
08-02-2013, 03:00 PM
Nepal arrests 2 men in case of missing American hiker

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/08/02/nepal-arrests-2-men-in-case-missing-american-hiker/#ixzz2aq8Z5suh

Suspects admit to murdering missing US trekker

http://www.myrepublica.com/portal/index.php?action=news_details&news_id=58847

SeaEclipse
08-02-2013, 05:06 PM
Suspects admit to murdering missing US trekker

http://www.myrepublica.com/portal/index.php?action=news_details&news_id=58847

This article indicates that 3 more people have been arrested and has the names of 4 of the 5 (the original 2 + 2 of the 3 new ones). There's also more detail:

"According to the police, Jagat and Pemba have disclosed that they followed Aubrey right from Syafrubensi. They whisked her away in Langtang-1 and murdered her. Her dead body, passport and other documents were thrown into the Langtang River. They looted a camera and some cash from her.
Jagat and Pemba have also told the police that Lakpa masterminded the kidnapping and murder of Aubrey. Most of the suspects arrested in the case are involved in tourism business."

tarabull
08-02-2013, 05:21 PM
Nepal arrests 2 men in case of missing American hiker

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/08/02/nepal-arrests-2-men-in-case-missing-american-hiker/#ixzz2aq8Z5suh

Suspects admit to murdering missing US trekker

http://www.myrepublica.com/portal/index.php?action=news_details&news_id=58847

!!!!!!!!

ktgirl
08-02-2013, 08:37 PM
This article indicates that 3 more people have been arrested and has the names of 4 of the 5 (the original 2 + 2 of the 3 new ones). There's also more detail:

"According to the police, Jagat and Pemba have disclosed that they followed Aubrey right from Syafrubensi. They whisked her away in Langtang-1 and murdered her. Her dead body, passport and other documents were thrown into the Langtang River. They looted a camera and some cash from her.
Jagat and Pemba have also told the police that Lakpa masterminded the kidnapping and murder of Aubrey. Most of the suspects arrested in the case are involved in tourism business."

Last sentence bolded by me.

WOW! Well, I won't be going to Nepal anytime soon.

I hope these guys can lead authorities to Aubrey's remains so her family can bring her home. Rest in peace, Aubrey. You were a brave woman who embraced life, learning, and experiences. My guess is you "lived" more in your 23 years than many of those who live much longer. You can tell from her picture that Aubrey's eyes shined brightly & were so full of life. Reminds me of some lines from "Lament" from "Evita":
How I lived, how they shone; but how soon the lights were gone.

ktgirl
08-02-2013, 08:45 PM
I wonder if the group resposible for Aubrey's death had other victims and if so, if they only target women. I wonder if they also target men if they could be involved in the disappearance of Zisimos Souflas -
NEW NEPAL - Zisimos Souflas, Mount Everest region, 24 April 2012 - Websleuths Crime Sleuthing Community

Walker
08-03-2013, 12:00 AM
Quote from Inquisitr link:

The original case was bungled. Her father Paul Sacco himself discovered items belonging to his daughter in May 2011. They had been left in her hotel room and included a laptop that had presumably not been checked since her disappearance from the area over a year before.

Read more at http://www.**************/884060/aubrey-sacco-nepal-disappearance-suspects-arrested-in-three-year-old-missing-trekker-cold-case/#duMoQC6YXxVZB2TL.99





Actually the laptop was found within one month of ASs disappearance:


Quote from an old link that probably doesnt work anymore:



Dad of missing Nepal hiker finds daughter's laptop
The Associated Press
Posted: 05/20/2010 02:33:38 PM MDT
Updated: 05/20/2010 03:08:16 PM MDT

DENVERThe father of a Colorado woman who went missing while hiking in Nepal has discovered the missing woman's laptop and journal in the last hotel where she stayed.

A friend of missing hiker Aubrey Sacco told The Associated Press Thursday that the 23-year-old's father, Paul Sacco, is in Nepal looking for Aubrey. Aubrey Sacco has been missing since last month, when she left for a solo hike in the Himalayan mountains.

The family friend, Aileen Barry, says Paul Sacco found some personal items belonging to Aubrey at the last hotel where she stayed. Barry said Sacco has also met with officials from the U.S. embassy but that no more clues have been found to indicate what happened to Aubrey Sacco


Unless she had more than one laptop ...

The original case wasn't necessarily bungled. No evidence was found in the area in which she apparently disappeared at all. Unfortunately at that point in time, Maoist demonstrations disrupted civil order, and the diverted the attention of the Nepali army which normally patrols the park. With communication lines shut down, and transportation disrupted, the realization that AS had disappeared was delayed.

Here is a quote from another media article whose link is probably no longer active:



FBI Joins Search Effort for US Hiker Missing in Nepal

David Lohr Contributor

AOL News
(June 29) -- Despite seeing several large-scale searches end in disappointment, family members are not ready to give up on 23-year-old Aubrey Sacco, who went missing more than two months ago on a remote nature hike in Nepal. Instead, they are hopeful that recent involvement by the FBI will help move the case forward.

"The FBI is looking at it and they're saying it is a criminal matter," Sacco family spokeswoman Aileen Barry told AOL News. "They've asked us to hold off so they can get their people in line, so we can't say a lot about what they're doing. But honestly we don't know a lot" ....

"There have been Nepalese people who have said [to investigators], 'We know where she is and you'll never find her.' "

Barry explained some residents may be tight-lipped because of an incident that officials at the U.S. Embassy in Nepal related to the Sacco family.

"The embassy told us that 15 years ago there were two fishermen who found a body in a river," Barry explained. "These fishermen went to the authorities and told them. Afterward, they were arrested. There was no trial and they were thrown in prison. They just got out, so that is on everyone's mind and they aren't talking."

Walker
08-03-2013, 12:43 AM
A fascinating read:

http://www.highcrimesbook.com/


Find out why some Himalayan expeditions are bringing armed guards.

Being robbed of your water heater or sleeping bag or rope or other gear
@ 20K feet can cost your life.

The motives for the thefts are two-fold: local people simply want to sell the stolen gear for cash; but some Western climbers deliberately plan to exploit their fellow climbers supplies & equipment, rather than pay for porters to help them get to the top.

The book is shocking in that the thieves put their victims in mortal danger for such a relatively small financial benefit to themselves.

danzn16
08-03-2013, 07:02 PM
Just saw this case on CNN


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed
08-05-2013, 10:29 PM
Family of missing CU-Boulder grad Aubrey Sacco: Recent arrests not linked to murder

A spokeswoman with the family of Aubrey Sacco, the University of Colorado graduate who went missing while hiking alone in Nepal's Langtang area in 2010, on Saturday said that U.S. officials confirmed three people have been arrested in the mountainous Asian country in connection with her disappearance.

However, those officials refuted reports in Nepalese media that those arrested admitted to murdering Sacco and throwing her body in a river.

"The Nepal media information turned out to be inaccurate. We are back to square one," Aileen Barry, a Sacco family spokeswoman, said Saturday evening. "Right now, the embassy said the police are still diligently pursuing the investigation."

More: http://www.dailycamera.com/news/boulder/ci_23791996/family-missing-cu-boulder-grad-aubrey-sacco-recent

Walker
08-07-2013, 07:42 PM
Suspects admit to murdering missing US trekker

http://www.myrepublica.com/portal/in...&news_id=58847

Followed My Republica with regard to another case in Nepal, and found the articles found there to be more detailed, apparently more carefully researched & much less sensationalized than Western media coverage.

Seems odd that they would publish a total fabrication.

Perhaps one of the suspects was coerced into giving a false confession, and US or other investigators later detected that fact. Often certain information about the case is held back to prevent such scenarios.

Interesting that one of the suspects is from Katmandu, where AS stayed prior to departing for Langtang, and that some of them are described as being in the travel industry.

AS may have gone to some agency in Katmandu to inquire about getting a guide for her hike. Or perhaps a helicopter ride.

Both AS and Zisimus Souflas set out on very ambitious hikes towards the end of their stays abroad. Had they attained their stated destinations, they would likely have also missed their return flights home. Both hikers were traveling alone & stayed at small local lodgings.

Could there be some other similarity? Maybe ZS too came into contact with the suspect group.

ktgirl
08-08-2013, 05:54 PM
I'm so confused. Have these suspects admitted to murdering Aubrey or not? Are they connected to her disappearance or not?

Nugget
11-07-2013, 08:35 AM
This is disappointing. I can't find any new info. Her family deserves answers.


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Nugget
11-25-2013, 09:38 AM
Family posts update 11/21/13

http://www.aubreysacco.com/MakeLove2Life/Search_Update.html




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Nugget
12-23-2013, 03:33 PM
*bump* for Aubrey. Her family deserves answers. Aubrey is such a beautiful free spirit. Bless her and her family during this holiday season.

danzn16
02-09-2014, 12:53 AM
Bumping for Aubrey

LibbyMarie
03-21-2014, 10:38 PM
Bumping for Aubrey & her family

http://www.backpacker.com/gone-girl-aubrey-saccos-disappearance-hiking-in-nepal/destinations/18334

neverletgo
03-22-2014, 12:06 PM
Bumping for Aubrey & her family

http://www.backpacker.com/gone-girl-aubrey-saccos-disappearance-hiking-in-nepal/destinations/18334

:wagon: to Websleuths, LibbyMarie!

Thanks for posting that link! :gthanks:

tarabull
04-25-2014, 11:16 PM
:bump:

Parents of missing trekkers seek help
April 26, 2014

http://www.ekantipur.com/2014/04/26/capital/parents-of-missing-trekkers-seek-help/388776.html