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View Full Version : PA Photographer refuses to take senior pics for bullies



Pandora
08-21-2011, 02:48 PM
INDIANA COUNTY, Pa. -- An Indiana County photographer has decided not to shoot senior pictures for a group of high school girls she saw bullying and harassing other students online.

"I don't want to photograph them, I don't want them to be a part of my business image and I don't want them on my blog," Jennifer McKendrick told Channel 4 Action News' Ashlie Hardway.

McKendrick said she saw four high school seniors bullying other kids on an anonymous Facebook page that went beyond just name-calling.

"It was beyond 'your clothes are ugly' or 'you don't have any brand clothes' or 'you are ugly, your hair is not right.' It was vicious. It was talking about sexuality," McKendrick said.

She told Hardway that she was supposed to take the girls' senior portraits.

Instead of taking their pictures, McKendrick took screen shots of the online comments and sent them to her clients' parents, saying she saw their children's behavior on the Internet and was canceling their sessions and refunding their $200 deposits.

Read more: http://www.wtae.com/high-school-playbook/28907376/detail.html#ixzz1VgsytJE2More at link: http://www.wtae.com/high-school-playbook/28907376/detail.html

Charlie09
08-21-2011, 02:54 PM
It's her business, she should be able to have the clientele she wants.

sherbetjello
08-21-2011, 03:00 PM
Well, here is my thought, if the parents of these bullies aren't willing to face and correct these issues w/I their children, the public should be allowed to. "it takes a village"

I appreciate what this photog is doing, but I'm the parent of a child being bullied.

LadyL
08-21-2011, 07:14 PM
awesome! glad to see her stand up for what's right & hopefully those students learn from this

Tugela
08-21-2011, 09:36 PM
What was she doing on the kids facebook pages to start with?

Looking for an "incident" to make a "stand" so as to get some free publicity?

Alaska4959
08-22-2011, 01:34 AM
What was she doing on the kids facebook pages to start with?

Looking for an "incident" to make a "stand" so as to get some free publicity?

Kids get their senior pictures taken with lots of different props and backgrounds these days. Perhaps she was looking to see what their interests were so she could have appropriate props, etc., available when they came for their sittings?

Elphaba
08-22-2011, 07:07 PM
If this photographer has a Facebook page and the girls "liked" it or "friended" the photographer, whatever activities they are involved in would be viewable to the photographer... and I applaud her for taking a stand against the bullies.

HMSHood
08-22-2011, 08:15 PM
It's her business, she should be able to have the clientele she wants.

Exactly. Good for her.

HMSHood
08-22-2011, 08:23 PM
What was she doing on the kids facebook pages to start with?

Looking for an "incident" to make a "stand" so as to get some free publicity?

If the bullies did not "like" or "friend" her that wouldn't happen.

ohiogirl
08-23-2011, 11:41 AM
Good for her. Hopefully more people will do things like this. I also think it was a good way to bring the teenagers' behavior to the attention of their parents. I don't know how anyone can fault this woman for what she did. jmo

chasing.halos
08-23-2011, 11:51 AM
Love love love. Thank you Jennifer for taking a stand. I like when action is taken. Sometimes I think the "anti-bullying" campaigns are just all talk.

Velouria
08-23-2011, 04:27 PM
Good for her. Hopefully more people will do things like this. I also think it was a good way to bring the teenagers' behavior to the attention of their parents. I don't know how anyone can fault this woman for what she did. jmo


BBM

I agree with you ohiogirl. But as for your last sentence bolded above, you can bet some people will. http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-rolleyes008.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.php)

Kimberlyd125
08-23-2011, 05:05 PM
Is this legal?

Lucid
08-23-2011, 05:30 PM
I think this is pretty awesome. Especially since it must have cost her a pretty penny to give back $212 per person in a group.

While at first I balked at the thought that she may have looked up her clients online, I suppose it isn't all that strange or abnormal to do. She's working one-on-one with these people, and a lot of people do research, background checks, etc prior to hiring or other things. It wouldn't have happened if the clients had their facebooks marked private... but they let it out in the public, it's their own faults if somebody looked them up or found them. It's not a crime to look at things put out to the public, no matter what the photographer's reasons for looking were...

gitana1
08-23-2011, 11:25 PM
Is this legal?

Yes. It is. Not only that, it's very moral, IMO.

Wish there were more adults out there who would take a stand in such a manner and hold kids accountable for evil behavior. Boy would we have a better world if they did!

gitana1
08-23-2011, 11:27 PM
I think this is pretty awesome. Especially since it must have cost her a pretty penny to give back $212 per person in a group.

While at first I balked at the thought that she may have looked up her clients online, I suppose it isn't all that strange or abnormal to do. She's working one-on-one with these people, and a lot of people do research, background checks, etc prior to hiring or other things. It wouldn't have happened if the clients had their facebooks marked private... but they let it out in the public, it's their own faults if somebody looked them up or found them. It's not a crime to look at things put out to the public, no matter what the photographer's reasons for looking were...

In one of the articles she stated something about not wanting them on her blog. That indicates to me that they may have been FB friends of hers somehow.

Kimberlyd125
08-24-2011, 06:59 AM
Yes. It is. Not only that, it's very moral, IMO.

Wish there were more adults out there who would take a stand in such a manner and hold kids accountable for evil behavior. Boy would we have a better world if they did!

I was just wondering. Because we just had a thread about people refusing services to people because they didn't like how they lived.

It was in Jersey.

Lucid
08-24-2011, 08:09 AM
In one of the articles she stated something about not wanting them on her blog. That indicates to me that they may have been FB friends of hers somehow.

I believe she is one of those "private" photographers - I see them ALL the time because I follow a lot of "mom" blogs, and so many have these pictures done of their kids - but they are expensive. But oh so pretty. Outdoorsy type pictures, and the photographer plays with settings in photoshop to change lighting, etc. Lots of pictures that don't look "posed" but more natural...

Lots of these photographers have "blogs" that they post their work on, and comments about the subjects - such as how cute they are (children or babies) or what a beautiful family it is.

There's actually a link to her blog at the bottom of that news article where you can see. These sorts of photographers tend to be more "personal" than going to a studio, so I could totally see why she wouldn't want these girls posted on her blog! It wouldn't surprise me, though, if they did "like" her on facebook or something, or if she keeps a facebook for her business.

passionflower
08-24-2011, 10:04 AM
I'm behind her 100%........punish those bullies anyway you can!

gitana1
08-24-2011, 12:58 PM
I was just wondering. Because we just had a thread about people refusing services to people because they didn't like how they lived.

It was in Jersey.

Yes, I am aware of the thread and the case. Let me try to clear up the difference. It is illegal to discriminate against a "protected class", i.e. refuse service solely on the basis of one's gender, race, religion, ethnicity, sex, sexuality, etc.

Bullies are not a protected class. They are just bullies. It is 100% legal to refuse service to them and in my non-legal opinion, almost everyone in America would agree that it is wholly just to do so.

Kimberlyd125
08-24-2011, 03:05 PM
I'm not arguing that for sure.

I was just wondering if it was legal.

Thinking legally, I would think the customers are the parents and the subjects of the photos are minors.

Just thinking out loud.

raeann
08-24-2011, 04:00 PM
Yes, I am aware of the thread and the case. Let me try to clear up the difference. It is illegal to discriminate against a "protected class", i.e. refuse service solely on the basis of one's gender, race, religion, ethnicity, sex, sexuality, etc.

Bullies are not a protected class. They are just bullies. It is 100% legal to refuse service to them and in my non-legal opinion, almost everyone in America would agree that it is wholly just to do so.

ITA....refusal of this service is no different than a bar refusing to serve someone who is already behaving in an angry or aggressive manor toward other patrons.

gitana1
08-24-2011, 06:46 PM
I'm not arguing that for sure.

I was just wondering if it was legal.

Thinking legally, I would think the customers are the parents and the subjects of the photos are minors.

Just thinking out loud.

No, I guarantee you, it is perfectly legal to deny a person service unless the reason for the denial is discrimination of a protected class. Parents of bullies aren't a protected class either, so this photographer is good to go. And I say good for her!

I really hope the parents of these girls deal with this in an effective manner. If one of my kids did something so ugly and vicious, some kind of "beating" would likely occur at my house and I don't even believe in hitting kids! LOL.

In reality, I would be so upset, ashamed and disappointed. I was the target of bullies and was taught how to fight back. I have often thought about how to help my own kids deal with bullies. I have never given much thought to what I would do if they were the aggressor!

I would probably take every privilege known to man away from them, force them to "volunteer" at some sort of charity, have them dig some holes they can later fill up, and have them write abject letters of apology to the kids who were targeted, including how they now know why such bullying is wrong and how ashamed they now feel.

This is the chance their parents have to instill character in their kids. It's the most important thing a parent can do besides just loving them to death!

Truthful Lies
08-25-2011, 08:05 AM
I'll add my two cents here...and I'm a photographer that has shot pro athletes, etc., for ads and promo stuff. I applaud her for refusing. It IS important to know about the subject you're shooting. If you don't know what you're trying to capture, it's much harder. The client needs to feel comfortable expressing themselves or the shoot will be a bust, mostly.

I have a session with clients beforehand, to get to know them and what they're trying to convey, along with running over everything they need to know. If this photographer met them beforehand, and didn't like their vibe, I see why she looked at their FB pages. Maybe she is a "sleuth" like us and wanted to know more. I'm also careful about what/who I shoot because my name will be on there - and I don't want it muddied. Perhaps the photog felt if she shot these girls, the other parents wouldn't want the same photog to do their daughter's pics, too.

I don't shoot people I'm not interested in/don't like for whatever reason I deem good enough. Photography (to me) is capturing a fleeting moment in history (history major here...hah) and I don't pick up my camera if someone rubs me the wrong way. Oh well.

I promise to look into any teen girls I shoot (I'm a girl, btw and former model so I know how uncomfie it is to sit there!) and refuse to do so if I even sense they are "mean girls".

xoxo

ETA: I do understand this woman is a "working photographer", whereas I'm lucky to be able to pick and choose what I want to shoot (don't do it full time). So, I applaud her even more - it's a hard business.