PDA

View Full Version : Most Fascinating Unsolved Serial Killer Cases of the 20th Century Poll



STANDREID
07-11-2012, 09:46 PM
Who are you most intrigued by regarding unsolved serial killers of the Twentieth Century?

PATX
07-11-2012, 10:25 PM
Tough to pick. But I went with the Axeman of New Orleans.

STANDREID
07-12-2012, 06:30 AM
That's a big one PATX and coming up on its centennial too.

JenniferTx
07-12-2012, 11:21 AM
I voted for the Zodiac. I would love for LE to figure out who he is.

STANDREID
07-12-2012, 07:52 PM
Yep Jen - that's the most popular choice as I expected. It will be interesting to see who comes in second.

Bargle
07-12-2012, 08:35 PM
Excellent group of choices, Stan. I went with Zodiac, but the Cleveland Torso Murderer and EAR/ONS were on my short list.

I notice 2 people have voted for someone not on the list. Please, tell us who were thinking of.

STANDREID
07-12-2012, 09:26 PM
I notice 2 people have voted for someone not on the list. Please, tell us who were thinking of.

Yes please!

I probably had more than 25 cases I could have put on the list but I didn't want a poll where three fourths of the entries were zeros.

Bargle
07-13-2012, 08:36 PM
Excellent group of choices, Stan. I went with Zodiac, but the Cleveland Torso Murderer and EAR/ONS were on my short list.

I notice 2 people have voted for someone not on the list. Please, tell us who were thinking of.

Arghh! Still missed another typo. Should be Please, tell us who you were thinking of.

I'd add 3X, the Petter Killer, The Santa Rosa Hitch-hiker Murders and The Tylenol Poisonings. As you say, Stan, there's a bunch more that could be added.

STANDREID
07-13-2012, 10:25 PM
Another factor is how you define serial killer.

Bargle
07-14-2012, 11:58 AM
Good point. I go by the DOJ (I think) guideline of 2 or more murders, committed as separate events. I know others require 3 or more. I tend to think that anyone who kills a stranger with a sexual aspect to the murder, might be considered a potential serial killer.

Montjoy
07-14-2012, 09:46 PM
Good point. I go by the DOJ (I think) guideline of 2 or more murders, committed as separate events. I know others require 3 or more. I tend to think that anyone who kills a stranger with a sexual aspect to the murder, might be considered a potential serial killer.

Not meaning to split hairs here, but one of the main criteria is that there is a 'cool-down' period between murders. This is to distinguish the 'serial murderer' from the 'spree killer'. I would use as an example the spree killer whose name I forget, but who drove around Illinois and Indiana (maybe Wisconsin too?) and shot a number of people who weren't white (e.g., ex Northwestern U basketball coach Ricky Byrdsong). Ricky's murder was physically distant (hence separate) from the other murders of the evening, and although part of a series, I don't think his killer (who was caught) was considered a serial murderer inasmuch as he was seen as a spree killer.

Bargle
07-15-2012, 09:09 AM
Not hairsplitting at all. I certainly meant that there would be a cool down period between murders. I just didn't think to include it. Thanks for bringing that out.

STANDREID
07-15-2012, 11:18 AM
I believe all of the ten cases I listed are considered serial killers by anyone's definition.

The definition from and National Institute of Justice which is also used by Newton in his Encyclopedia of Serials Killers uses the minimum of two perpetrated as separate events tenet which I basically go by. I only have one problem with it and that is that it doesn't stipulate a minimum time regarding the cooling off period. Without that, it's sort of tough to draw a line between spree and serial killers.

Bargle
07-15-2012, 09:49 PM
I believe all of the ten cases I listed are considered serial killers by anyone's definition.

Agreed.
And we still haven't heard what those 2 other cases are. :waitasec:

STANDREID
07-16-2012, 08:33 AM
Yes, please tell us who.

acmeintuitiveenergy
07-31-2012, 10:33 AM
Jack the Stripper and Zodiac are linked. There were seven Jack the Stripper victims and 7 Zodiac victims.

Jacie Estes
07-31-2012, 12:12 PM
I just added the third vote for 'other'. My choice is Richard Biegenwald of New Jersey. My reason[s] for choosing him are varied. He 'lived' quietly in communities, after having been in prison for shooting to death an Assistant Prosecutor in North Jersey and being released. I say quietly because, even though there were unsolved murders in the neighborhoods he lived in, he was never charged with them.

One of his victims, Betsy Bacon, was a neighbor of ours. She worked in a fast food place in Sea Girt, NJ. About a year later, Biegenwald tried to pick up a young girl walking down the highway, going home after a night of roller skating. The rink was right across the street from where Betsy worked. A girl from Bricktown, NJ, Maria Ciallella, was found buried in Biegenwald's mother's yard in Staten Island, NY. Maria's mother stated that when she went to identify her daughter's jewelry, LE had several conference tables with jewelry laid out in rows on them. She asked the police, 'how many victims are there?'. The response was that LE didn't know.

There was another elderly woman from Point Pleasant Beach, NJ, who he had down some 'chores' for, whose body was found in a trunk in her attic. Also, in PPB, NJ, there was a rooming house fire where several people died, Biegenwald was seen standing watching the fire fighting efforts. Another death, in nearby Bricktown, NJ; an 8 month pregnant woman, who commuted on the same train to work that Beigenwald did, was found in her apartment, murdered with the fetus cut out and dead. There were many unsolved killings of girls/women, in the time Biegenwald was in the area.

After Biegenwald had been in prison for at least a decade, a friend who then wrote for a national music magazine, tried to interview Biegenwald in prison. My friend had connected a lot of dots and wanted to find out if he was, indeed, responsible for all the other deaths and possibly more. All his efforts were stonewalled. He got an 'off the record' comment from LE that Biegenwald may have killed at least 75-100 people.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~batsto/Misc/Crime/Biegenwald/Biegenwald_Murders.html

I am fascinated by this case because of the unknowns. Biegenwald is dead now so there will probably never be answers.

STANDREID
09-04-2012, 08:09 AM
Hmm, it looks like the three most recent are also the three that generate the most interest.

STANDREID
09-11-2012, 09:27 AM
And, the two with no votes are among the oldest 4.

STANDREID
10-07-2012, 06:45 AM
All but 3 are in my lifetime or maybe all but 2 if you count the 1950 Cleveland murder.:what:

STANDREID
11-05-2012, 07:56 AM
I actually remember Strangler, Stripper, Zodiac and Babysitter real time on the news.

wfgodot
11-20-2012, 02:54 PM
Should Brooklyn's current mini-reign of terror continue, and should the case's possible numerical trappings (all addresses in the three slayings include the number '8') maintain its currency, the great tabloid nickname "Crazy 8 Killer" will enter the magical, mysterious, lexicon of the yet-unsolved, 21st century edition.

STANDREID
11-21-2012, 08:19 AM
Yes, that one and the LI killer - whatever they're calling him these days.

legalmania
11-23-2012, 12:26 AM
I'm going with Greg Rogers because I had no idea about this guy until just a few nights ago. This guy is on death row for at least two murders. He's been charged with 5, but says there has been 70. Most jurisdiction dropped their case because they were sure Greg was the perpetrator, he was able to identify parts of the case that only the killer would know, and since he was already sentenced to two deaths there was no use to continue the cases. His brother had no idea he was a killer until he found a body in his family home. After much inner feelings about turning a family member in, because his father said you never turn on family, he couldn't let the demon his brother Greg had inherited become his, so he went to police and lead them to a state to state killing spree by his much loved brother. Greg is up for death in 2012. Now is this a way to keep him alive, I hope not just let him die with his demons.

STANDREID
12-14-2012, 12:00 AM
I believe the ONS murders are now generally thought to run from 1975-86 with most of the activity concentrated in 1979-81.

jennapuppy
12-14-2012, 01:38 AM
Zodiac is the one I chose. He truly fit the description of the "boogey man".
Scary!

STANDREID
12-16-2012, 12:01 AM
My second choice would be Texarkana Phantom and it doesn't have any votes yet.:waitasec:

BOESP
12-23-2012, 10:38 PM
My second choice would be Texarkana Phantom and it doesn't have any votes yet.:waitasec:

Anyone who's seen "The Town That Dreaded Sundown" would definitely vote for this as number one or two!!!

STANDREID
12-24-2012, 12:00 AM
I agree 100%!

STANDREID
12-25-2012, 12:02 AM
Zodiac is the one I chose. He truly fit the description of the "boogey man".
Scary!

And about half agree.

LunaticFringe
12-28-2012, 11:33 PM
Colonial Parkway Killer.


I think I voted for another though. :) Zodiac Killer

nutkin
01-02-2013, 01:56 AM
The Killing Fields murders in League City, TX and others along the I-45 corridor

STANDREID
01-15-2013, 12:02 AM
The Killing Fields murders in League City, TX and others along the I-45 corridor

Is the 2011 film Texas Killing Fields based on or inspired by this case? If so, have you seen it and is it any good?

Dragonfyree
01-17-2013, 04:56 PM
I also voted for Zodiac, but I've always had real problems with the Axman as the more versions you read there seem to be a lot of misinformation, such as previous murders in 1914 or so that never occurred and that the widow of one of the victims killed a man she said was the Axman, which never happened.

During that same time there were axe murders going on between Louisiana and Texas along the railroad where dozens of people were killed. They were mainly mulatto families. Some times 4-5 people, (men, women and children) at a time.

STANDREID
01-17-2013, 08:19 PM
Then you have more ax murders in the Midwest around the same time including Villisca.

Dragonfyree
01-18-2013, 11:24 AM
Then you have more ax murders in the Midwest around the same time including Villisca.

I know there was another mass ax murder either a few days before or after the Villisca murders within a couple hundred miles..

STANDREID
02-15-2013, 12:01 AM
Yes, most of the Midwest ones (even Villisca by some) are blamed on Henry Lee Moore although he was never convicted of killing anyone other than his mother and grandmother. He was actually released from prison in the late 1940s and received a pardon sometime around 1955.

STANDREID
02-25-2013, 08:00 PM
Henry Lee Moore was actually pardoned in 1956, after which, all trace of him was lost. He was born 1874 so we can safely say that he is long gone.

STANDREID
02-26-2013, 12:02 AM
Anyone who's seen "The Town That Dreaded Sundown" would definitely vote for this as number one or two!!!

It's unashamedly low budget but it sets the standard for making a movie about an unsolved serial killer case.

EmmaliLucia
03-01-2013, 09:46 PM
Cleveland Torso Slayer.

Just the fact that not only did he never get caught, only TWO (three if you count possible victims) of his/her TWELVE (fifteen possible) victims were even identified.

STANDREID
03-02-2013, 12:11 AM
Anyone who's seen "The Town That Dreaded Sundown" would definitely vote for this as number one or two!!!

As per The Town That Dreaded Sundown Wiki page, MGM is scheduled to remake this movie starring Jennifer Lopez and Brad Pitt. Several years ago a British director was said to be remaking this film but that project apparently fell through.

iron_angel
03-03-2013, 04:05 PM
I voted others. Although this serial killer was known for his 24+ murders, he had never been charged as he was already on the run. The way he eluded the authority, never to be heard of again always fascinated me. His murders arent unsolved as he is known for them but what is unvolved is his where-abouts after he flew from his country during WW1 and how many more murders he was responsible for and I'm talking about Bela Kiss

If we are talking merely about unsolved murders with an unknown assaillant then I would have to go with the Zodiac as well as the Toronto angel of death from the very early 80's

Tober
03-04-2013, 12:10 AM
Zodiac takes it (so far); he is thrilled.

STANDREID
03-20-2013, 07:27 AM
If he's still living and sees it, I'm sure that's true.

STANDREID
05-01-2013, 07:12 AM
Cleveland Torso Slayer.

Just the fact that not only did he never get caught, only TWO (three if you count possible victims) of his/her TWELVE (fifteen possible) victims were even identified.

I'm with you.

STANDREID
06-09-2013, 09:10 AM
Well, one away from nice round numbers.

STANDREID
06-09-2013, 10:02 AM
Ah - perfect!

Snoods
06-10-2013, 05:56 AM
Since I've lived in south Texas all my life and my family had a beach house in Galveston, of course I've always been tremendously interested in the Texas Killing Fields. And what about the Monster of Florence? 16 murders, all couples that were parked in their cars "making out" over a period of about 20 years in Florence, Italy. Really interesting book about it.

Snoods
06-10-2013, 06:05 AM
Is the 2011 film Texas Killing Fields based on or inspired by this case? If so, have you seen it and is it any good?

Yes, the movie Texas Killing Fields is inspired by the case. It is pretty good, you should see it. Scares the bejeebies out of me because this person or persons has never been caught. You know the guy who founded Texas Equusearch, Tim Miller? His daughter Laura was a Texas Killing Field victim.

Lol of course I'm fashionably late to this thread, per my usual! Just noticed it and had to put in my :twocents:

STANDREID
06-10-2013, 07:12 AM
I think there's still a standing conviction in the Monster of Florence case. Of course, many don't believe in the conviction.

txsvicki
06-10-2013, 08:45 AM
The Texas Killing Fields, the original night stalker, and the one who abducted children and fed them a favorite food before death. I've never heard of most on the list and too squeamish about serial killers to look them up.

Snoods
06-10-2013, 08:05 PM
I think there's still a standing conviction in the Monster of Florence case. Of course, many don't believe in the conviction.

Oh wow really? I knew there had been a few people arrested and released, but I didn't realize there was still a standing conviction. Sorry about that. You probably know this but the prosecutor was the same guy that prosecuted Amanda Knox. An interesting fact.

Snoods
06-10-2013, 08:18 PM
The Texas Killing Fields, the original night stalker, and the one who abducted children and fed them a favorite food before death. I've never heard of most on the list and too squeamish about serial killers to look them up.

Has anyone heard about the Missing Texas 40? Not believed to have any connection with the Texas Killing Fields, these unsolved murders are all in the Montgomery county and Liberty county area and are believed by many to be connected. Very interesting article article about it. http://www.missingpersonsofamerica.com/2012/03/missing-texas-forty.html

And I believe the guy who fed the kids their favorite food is the one called the babysitter killer on the poll. That was super creepy. And I agree with a lot of people here that the Zodiac is a puzzler as well.

STANDREID
06-12-2013, 07:38 AM
And I believe the guy who fed the kids their favorite food is the one called the babysitter killer on the poll. That was super creepy.

Yes, that's correct.

starry1
06-26-2013, 11:34 PM
I went with Axman because the most interesting to me was in the late 1880s, the Austin Servant Girl Annihilator.

Hnyvek32
06-27-2013, 05:58 AM
That's a toughie, but I think I'm going to have to go with the Coast Fiend Killer that preyed on (mostly) young women in the San Diego, CA area in the 1930s or the unidentified axe murderer of Villisca, IA in 1912. Both of these are fascinating not only for the crimes attributed them, but for the possibility of crimes that they might well have been involved in as well. Most notably the Black Dahlia case and the string of axe slayings between Colorado Springs and Illinois, respectively.

STANDREID
07-15-2013, 08:04 AM
Yes, the "Coast Fiend" gets some coverage although not a lot. It is an entry in Still at Large.... by Michael Newton as San Diego murder - California (1931-36)

STANDREID
08-17-2013, 06:13 AM
Well, all have a voter although one is still on their lonesome.

STANDREID
08-25-2013, 08:30 AM
Apparently California serial killers generate the most interest although I'm not sure why.

Foxfire
08-31-2013, 01:37 AM
Imo, Kenneth McDuff(TX), Otis Toole(FL), and Henry Lucas(TX) are 3 of the worst. The numbers are so many. It is difficult to classify the worst.. Serial Killers seldom tell the truth or give up all their victims. Investigators/prosecutors rarely reveal the complete victim totals to prevent scaring the bejeezus out of the public, imo.. The most notorious serial killers have never been identified, imo. In 2004, a state LEO contacted the FBI BAU2 and alerted them that there was an extremely high number of females being located near interstates. The FBI began the Highway Trucker SK iniative in 2009. 500 victims and 200 POIs & suspects were connected via FBI VICAP. That was 4 years ago. Not sure what the totals are now.

Highway Serial Killings
New Initiative on an Emerging Trend
http://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2009/april/highwayserial_040609

The Long Island Serial Killer is nicknamed 'LISK'..

If you think about it, the total number of active serial killers has grown tremendously in the USA since 2005 when a serial killer was redefined and the total victims were lowered from 3 to 2 by the FBI BAU2 symposium attendees. It would be logical to conclude that Chicago, and other cities with gang wars, drivebys, and increasing homicides rates would have an abnormal rate of serial killers, jmo.

http://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/serial-murder/serial-murder-1
Behavioral Analysis Unit-2
National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime
CIRG - FBI
http://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/serial-murder/serial-murder-1

Serial Murder Symposium 2005

The different discussion groups at the Symposium agreed on a number of similar factors to be included in a definition. These included:

• one or more offenders
• two or more murdered victims
• incidents should be occurring in separate events, at different times
• the time period between murders separates serial murder from mass murder

In combining the various ideas put forth at the Symposium, the following definition was crafted:

Serial Murder: The unlawful killing of two or more victims by the same offender(s), in separate events.

STANDREID
09-16-2013, 08:29 AM
Does "Highway Trucker" go back to the old Truckstop Killer Case?

STANDREID
09-17-2013, 08:38 AM
Probably more correctly, Truckstop Killer cases.

kline
09-18-2013, 05:25 AM
Apparently California serial killers generate the most interest although I'm not sure why.
You know I hadnt picked up on that looking at the results but your right.

STANDREID
10-12-2013, 06:32 AM
Apparently California serial killers generate the most interest although I'm not sure why.

I think there was at least one potential Zodiac murder outside of the state but California was his headquarters - no doubt.

ctaylor
10-23-2013, 07:18 PM
I would say overall Zodiac, however I voted for Bible John. Glasgow is my home city and growing up through the 1970s and 1980s, "Bible John" was still something that instilled fear in young women. Glasgow in the 1960s/1970s was a very tough and populous city. Murder was not uncommon, so the fact that "Bible John" managed to become so notorious showed the scale of the nerve it had struck. That fear has gone now with the passing of years but the notoriety of it remains. Still now we get articles and police appeals. Some say there was no such person and they were all seperate incidents. Some believe it was Peter Tobin, a Scottish killer who is in prison now for the murders of 3 women and the evidence is pretty compelling. One of the women killed by Tobin was a Polish student who he murdered and buried under the floor of a church that I had been to many times before. When I saw the news it was a real shock and I will never forget that poor girl's distressed family on the news coming over from Poland.

I was slightly surprised to see this case in among such famous American cases in your poll Stan :) It must have been one that intrigued you a lot. If there are ever any new updates in the local news I will make sure I post them somewhere.

STANDREID
10-23-2013, 08:08 PM
I was slightly surprised to see this case in among such famous American cases in your poll Stan :) It must have been one that intrigued you a lot. If there are ever any new updates in the local news I will make sure I post them somewhere.

Thanks ctaylor! Yes, I was intrigued by the case when I first read about it maybe 20 years ago in Brian Lane and Wilfred Gregg's The Encyclopedia of Serial Killers. A direct contemporary with Zodiac but he didn't have as good a PR firm it seems. Tobin is the most popular solution but I'm not convinced. I am pretty much convinced, however, that the three murders were by the same hand.

STANDREID
10-25-2013, 08:19 AM
Apparently California serial killers generate the most interest although I'm not sure why.

Ohio is the other state with more than on entry.

STANDREID
11-05-2013, 09:31 AM
Well, everyone has a discussion mate now since each has at least 2 votes.

Winward1
11-11-2013, 02:31 PM
Texarkana Phantom is the best name for any serial killer, IMHO.

kilahchris
11-15-2013, 04:25 PM
The Original Night stalker had to be the most brazen serial rapist\killer in United States History. 50 rapes in Sacramento alone.

The man even would even ride a bicycle to some of his crime scenes. He even showed up to one of his victim's house with a german shepherd. He would stay and eat tthe food within the house for hours before leaving!

It boggles my mind Law enforcement was unable to catch such a prolific serial offender! Terrible Police work!

STANDREID
11-26-2013, 09:21 AM
Texarkana Phantom is the best name for any serial killer, IMHO.

It is good for a scare; that's for sure.

I always "liked" Boston Strangler because it tells you where and how in two words.

Winward1
11-26-2013, 10:05 AM
This is true. That said, could the Zodiac have been called the Bay Area Shooter?

STANDREID
11-26-2013, 11:32 AM
He might have been called something like that had he not sent the letters. It doesn't sound quite right now that we are used to Zodiac though. Before the Dear Boss Letter, I believe Jack the Ripper was known as the Whitechapel Murderer.

CanManEh
11-26-2013, 03:45 PM
K im sorry cause this case is solved .But why has no one ever heard of it or I cant find a thread the girls name is Purity Marie Knight (AKA Ariadne P. Knight or crime.com and if you all think the boy in the box case is fascinating this one is way crazier does anyone know anything about this case or if there is a thread on here for her i cant find it if there is ..she was held captive in a coffin barried under the ground with one air vent showing for many days weeks i believe its a crazy case i couldn't believe it has never been in the news or a documentary or something...

Bargle
11-27-2013, 07:47 AM
K im sorry cause this case is solved .But why has no one ever heard of it or I cant find a thread the girls name is Purity Marie Knight (AKA Ariadne P. Knight or crime.com and if you all think the boy in the box case is fascinating this one is way crazier does anyone know anything about this case or if there is a thread on here for her i cant find it if there is ..she was held captive in a coffin barried under the ground with one air vent showing for many days weeks i believe its a crazy case i couldn't believe it has never been in the news or a documentary or something...

I think you've got the name wrong. Barbara Jane Mackle is the girl who was buried alive in a box with a ventilator setup. Here's the Wikipedia page.

Barbara Jane Mackle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

STANDREID
12-12-2013, 07:25 AM
I remember when the Mackle case was on the news.

STANDREID
01-14-2014, 09:05 AM
I wonder what she is doing now.

STANDREID
02-07-2014, 12:01 AM
Zodiac still holds the lead and by a margin that surprises me a bit.

STANDREID
02-19-2014, 09:18 AM
The two tied for last is predictable.

STANDREID
02-19-2014, 11:00 AM
As in other polls, more recent seem to have an edge.

STANDREID
02-19-2014, 11:01 AM
My interests tend toward the opposite.

STANDREID
03-15-2014, 08:33 AM
There is supposedly a new book out on Bible John. I haven't found out whether it's self published or not.

STANDREID
03-27-2014, 07:43 AM
A person who has seen the book has communicated to me that the book does not appear to be self published.

asp17061
04-21-2014, 08:45 PM
I had to go with Other
The I-70 Killer segment on Unsolved Mysteries scared the heck out of me as a kid.

The CT Valley Killer was also a scary one.

STANDREID
05-10-2014, 08:39 AM
I had to go with Other
The I-70 Killer segment on Unsolved Mysteries scared the heck out of me as a kid.

The CT Valley Killer was also a scary one.

I think the Valley Killer was on UM as well.

STANDREID
06-03-2014, 08:23 AM
The Original Night stalker had to be the most brazen serial rapist\killer in United States History. 50 rapes in Sacramento alone.

The man even would even ride a bicycle to some of his crime scenes. He even showed up to one of his victim's house with a german shepherd. He would stay and eat tthe food within the house for hours before leaving!

It boggles my mind Law enforcement was unable to catch such a prolific serial offender! Terrible Police work!

Being the most recent, I suppose it's the one most likely to be solved but that fades every day.

ctaylor
06-10-2014, 07:16 PM
There is supposedly a new book out on Bible John. I haven't found out whether it's self published or not.
Hi Stan, yes a book was published last year. This article contains an interview with the author, who believes "Bible John" was actually a policeman who was pensioned off and went to the north of Scotland and who may still be alive. He says the sister of one of the victims picked out a policeman when giving evidence at a police station and that the man who killed her sister had a police warrant card. The author also rules out Tobin...

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/bible-john-police-officer-says-2218723

chlban
06-18-2014, 10:49 AM
So the Zodiac still takes the lead. Anyone think there is any chance that will actually be solved, Officially?

Or any of these cases listed for that matter? I was recently under the impression that the Boston Strangler had been solved based on the new DNA tests (although I personally never beleived DeSalvo was the strangler, that certainly caused me to re-think my position), but it seems it remains officially open.

Bargle
06-19-2014, 08:50 AM
So the Zodiac still takes the lead. Anyone think there is any chance that will actually be solved, Officially?

Or any of these cases listed for that matter? I was recently under the impression that the Boston Strangler had been solved based on the new DNA tests (although I personally never beleived DeSalvo was the strangler, that certainly caused me to re-think my position), but it seems it remains officially open.

I think any of the ones from the 60s at least stands a chance of being solved. Most likely to me is the Original Night Stalker case since it went on for so long.

STANDREID
06-21-2014, 08:13 AM
I can't think of any case more than 60 years old that was solved to the satisfaction of the majority.

Xara
06-28-2014, 10:46 AM
I am from the SF Bay Area, so predictably I voted Zodiac.
There are many on list I haven't heard of.....wiki here I come!

STANDREID
06-29-2014, 09:08 AM
This year, we're in the 50th anniversaries for Boston Strangler and Jack the Stripper.

In 2018-19, we'll be in the 50th anniversaries for Bible John and Zodiac plus the 100th anniversary for New Orleans Axeman.

STANDREID
07-15-2014, 07:17 AM
In 2018-19, we'll be in the 50th anniversaries for Bible John and Zodiac plus the 100th anniversary for New Orleans Axeman.

I wonder if any of those will be a big deal.

Dragonfyree
07-23-2014, 09:45 AM
I think Zodiac is the most likely to be solved and that is if (And it's a big if). The DNA they have which came off the stamp actually belongs to him.

Although in the 1960's there would have been no reason to have someone else lick your stamp.

I don't think they will get a direct hit on him, but possibly on a relative who commits a crime and their DNA gets entered and the police get a hit on that.

I don't think the New Orleans Ax Man can ever be solved, because it has come down with so much folk lore, I'm not sure if anyone has published the true facts.

STANDREID
08-07-2014, 07:02 AM
Yes, I think the cases from the last half of the century have a fair chance of being solved. I strongly doubt that any before 1950 will ever be solved but that doesn't mean that we won't continue to get new suspects on a regular basis.

Dragonfyree
08-07-2014, 12:33 PM
I've often wondered how often after someone has died that a family member has gone into that trunk or box that grandpa always kept locked and hidden and found souvenirs?

What if that trunk contained the medieval costume, the rest of Paul Stine's shirt, practice letters with the codes. Or things from the Black Dahlia's purse.

Do you say something?

What if grandma suffering from Alzheimer suddenly starts talking about how she killed that first husband everyone thought had ran off.

I don't know what I would do, I think it would depend on the person. I think most serial killers are tyrannical with their family, such as Dr. Hodel, so his son didn't have any problem with coming forward with his theory his dad killed the Black Dahlia, but some, such as the "Happy Face Killer" was a great father.

I think with really old cases we may have to rely on family members who find something and go to the police.

Pettibon Junction
08-07-2014, 04:35 PM
I voted for "Other."

The Zodiac fascinates me and it was that case that got me interested in true crime to the extent I am in the first place but since he wrote so voluminously and left so many witnesses and survivors, it's hard not to feel like we already know everything about him (save for his real name).

Personally, being a New Englander, I'm most haunted by the Connecticut River Valley murders in New Hampshire/Vermont. There's some disagreement over which cases are actually linked (with some folks maintaining that they weren't a series at all) but the fact remains that between 1978 and 1988, unspeakably violent things happened in that region with alarming frequency.

The last of the generally-accepted CT River Valley crimes was the Jane Boroski attack in August of 1988 but there are a staggering number of unsolved murders and disappearances up there to this day that make me wonder whether the killings, even if they weren't all linked, ever really stopped.

STANDREID
10-06-2014, 08:36 AM
I think it was Unsolved Mysteries that did a particularly creepy account on the Valley Killer.