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View Full Version : What would your dream be.. for the future New Orleans?


Beyond Belief
09-03-2005, 05:34 PM
I think if I could dream...
I would want New Orleans with its history, shops, resorts, nightlife (entertainment), fine restaurants. A place to be enjoyed and loved by everyone.

But no more residential areas, I wouldn't want to see this happen to anyone ever again.

Just a dream. What would yours be?

concernedperson
09-03-2005, 05:38 PM
I think if I could dream...
I would want New Orleans with its history, shops, resorts, nightlife (entertainment), fine restaurants. A place to be enjoyed and loved by everyone.

But no more residential areas, I wouldn't want to see this happen to anyone ever again.

Just a dream. What would yours be?

I just posted something similar. I am very concerned about the ground saturation/below sea level and the way they build homes in the area. I also think it should be more of a temporary destination. I believe the corporate type employers will be relocating.

Details
09-03-2005, 05:40 PM
Yeah, keep the French Quarter (because it still hasn't flooded), let a lot of the land go back to it's natural state (underwater), rebuild the convention center and such, but make it a far smaller, far more tourist oriented city. Prohibit any toxic businesses from building there unless they can prove they would be unaffected by any future hurricane or flood.

Mabel
09-03-2005, 05:53 PM
Without residential areas there is no one to work at the hotels, restaurants, etc.

My feelings are that anyone still alive should be removed from the area and the sea should be allowed to claim it, as nature intends.

heavenlydaze
09-03-2005, 06:22 PM
I want to tell you guys, I find this thread quite uplifting. People trying to find solutions instead of placing blame (yes, Iíve got thoughts on that, too, but Iíll save them for another thread).
Iím not an engineer (in fact, when I was a kid, Dad said, ďDeb, get away from that wheelbarrow, you donít know nothiní about machineryĒ!)
Anyway, I found these two pics. One is a satellite shot before the flood, the other is a diagram showing what areas lie above & below sea level. I thought it was interesting.
I put these two together in photoshop, but if anyone wants to see the larger, originals, I can post them.
This just kind of lets you know the logistics of how this city became so swamped.
http://tinypic.com/dc5ziq.jpg

dakini
09-03-2005, 06:28 PM
I want to tell you guys, I find this thread quite uplifting. People trying to find solutions instead of placing blame (yes, Iíve got thoughts on that, too, but Iíll save them for another thread).
Iím not an engineer (in fact, when I was a kid, Dad said, ďDeb, get away from that wheelbarrow, you donít know nothiní about machineryĒ!)
Anyway, I found these two pics. One is a satellite shot before the flood, the other is a diagram showing what areas lie above & below sea level. I thought it was interesting.
I put these two together in photoshop, but if anyone wants to see the larger, originals, I can post them.
This just kind of lets you know the logistics of how this city became so swamped.
http://tinypic.com/dc5ziq.jpg
My dream for New Orleans is that it become a place of beauty, peace and tolerance for all people.

There is already a history of many religions, many cultures. It is lush, agriculturally.

It has a tradition of "pushing the envelope" artistically. May all people's within the area completely thrive and may all that is good about the area flourish!

Casshew
09-03-2005, 07:28 PM
French Quarter, Garden District appear largely intact

Aerial shots indicate the city jewel -- the French Quarter -- remains intact and relatively dry, he said.

Cafť du Monde, the home of sugar-dusted beignets -- puffy, rectangular doughnuts -- is still there. Just across the street behind Jackson Square, the Cabildo and Presbytre museums still squat beside St. Louis Cathedral.

"By and large, the French Quarter seems to be dry," Foreman noted. "That's important. That's home to Preservation Hall.

"It's home to the streetcar named Desire. In the historic New Orleans museum, the Cabildo, they have the original maps that the Spanish drew of this nation. They have Napoleon's death mask. They have one of the last existing complete collections of [John James] Audubon's "Birds of America," the original collection.

"These are invaluable treasures to this nation and to the city," Foreman said. "That's what drew all these tourists here over all these years.... The French Quarter clearly has a lot of damage to it from wind and some from water, but it may be that it is largely intact at least in terms of the structures."


http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/09/03/katrina.french.quarter/index.html

Liz
09-03-2005, 08:04 PM
I think if I could dream...
I would want New Orleans with its history, shops, resorts, nightlife (entertainment), fine restaurants. A place to be enjoyed and loved by everyone.

But no more residential areas, I wouldn't want to see this happen to anyone ever again.

Just a dream. What would yours be?


You nailed my dream for the city. I emailed my congressmen and the President two days ago, exactly what you posted.

However, that dream will never be fulfilled. It's like the impossible dream.

Beyond Belief
09-05-2005, 11:42 PM
Will the water remain? Could this be turned into a Venice style city? That sure would be an interesting type of city to visit.

BirdieBoo
09-06-2005, 12:26 AM
You know what, I LOVE new Orleans. Love it, Love it, Love it. I have a scar that I will forever bear from tripping on an uneven cobblestone in that fair city (probably after one too many Hurricanes of the one person variety). I love that city, it is historical and beautiful. It is also dangerous, crime-wise. I have never been mugged there, but one of my friends has. I personally have never been treated other than respectfully and hospitably there.

One thing I hope is that the ciy will be cleaned up, maybe most of the gangs will be driven away by this disaster, and people can live there in peace. Another thought I've had about the violence after this storm, is that when junkies and crackheads get cut off from their supply, it can get pretty ugly. And I imagine plenty of junkies and crackheads did not want to evacuate properly,when they had the chance.

I am really glad to hear that the French Quarter has been spared, that place has been around longer than most of the USA. Perhaps some city planners might come up with a plan to make the city safer, for habitability and tourism,
before it is rebuilt.

The USA does have a lot to lose if the city is not rebuilt, it is rich agriculturally and for commerce with the Ole man Missisippi accessible, if I am not mistaken. a large supply of the USA's sugar comes from there, and you know how we love sugar.

Olivia77
09-06-2005, 12:44 AM
I hope that the historical value can be preserved. I hope that they (politicians and other officials) can take this opportunity to clean up the PD and unite LE and the people of the city in making it a prosperous and safe place to live. I don't know a thing about building a city, but I feel that if they restore the city in the proper way it can give those who live there a real sense of pride and accomplishment.

I love New Orleans, I was going to be married there in the Spring but our plans had to be changed at the last minute, which was about a month before the hurricane hit. Selfishly, I hope that things can be restored so that I can bring my grandchildren there and show them where Gram and Gramps got engaged.