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tybee204
09-05-2005, 03:18 PM
http://www3.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0410/feature5/


Oct 2004
It was a broiling August afternoon in New Orleans, Louisiana, the Big Easy, the City That Care Forgot. Those who ventured outside moved as if they were swimming in tupelo honey. Those inside paid silent homage to the man who invented air-conditioning as they watched TV "storm teams" warn of a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico. Nothing surprising there: Hurricanes in August are as much a part of life in this town as hangovers on Ash Wednesday.



The storm hit Breton Sound with the fury of a nuclear warhead, pushing a deadly storm surge into Lake Pontchartrain. The water crept to the top of the massive berm that holds back the lake and then spilled over. Nearly 80 percent of New Orleans lies below sea level—more than eight feet below in places—so the water poured in. A liquid brown wall washed over the brick ranch homes of Gentilly, over the clapboard houses of the Ninth Ward, over the white-columned porches of the Garden District, until it raced through the bars and strip joints on Bourbon Street like the pale rider of the Apocalypse. As it reached 25 feet (eight meters) over parts of the city, people climbed onto roofs to escape it.

Thousands drowned in the murky brew that was soon contaminated by sewage and industrial waste. Thousands more who survived the flood later perished from dehydration and disease as they waited to be rescued. It took two months to pump the city dry, and by then the Big Easy was buried under a blanket of putrid sediment, a million people were homeless, and 50,000 were dead. It was the worst natural disaster in the history of the United States.

When did this calamity happen? It hasn't—yet. But the doomsday scenario is not far-fetched. The Federal Emergency Management Agency lists a hurricane strike on New Orleans as one of the most dire threats to the nation,

Ntegrity
09-05-2005, 03:30 PM
Good find, tybee!!!

NewMom2003
09-05-2005, 04:03 PM
OMG, that is unbelievable. It was written not quite a year ago.

Sniffy38
09-05-2005, 04:08 PM
Thanks, Tybee. Why, or why wouldn't anyone listen? I guess just too many had their own interests, so in the end, everyone loses.

That was quite an interesting read. Hope everyone here gets to see it. It was even better than having a crystal ball.

Shadow205
09-05-2005, 09:36 PM
OMG, I got chill bumps reading that. Lets pray that the death count doesn't come close to what was written there.

Casshew
09-05-2005, 09:40 PM
When did this calamity happen? It hasn't—yet. But the doomsday scenario is not far-fetched. The Federal Emergency Management Agency lists a hurricane strike on New Orleans as one of the most dire threats to the nation,
Wow tybee, that gave me chills

Shadow205
09-05-2005, 09:59 PM
You got me looking around for more articles like this and found several. It is scary the accuracy of these scenarios. Here is a link to another good one

http://www.nola.com/hurricane/index.ssf?/washingaway/thebigone_1.html

THE BIG ONE

A major hurricane could decimate the region, but flooding from even a moderate storm could kill thousands. It's just a matter of time.

snip snip....



Louisiana emergency management officials say they lobbied the agency for years to study how to respond to New Orleans' vulnerability, finally getting attention last year. With computer modeling of hurricanes and storm surges, disaster experts have developed a detailed picture of how a storm could push Lake Pontchartrain over the levees and into the city.

snip snip......

All of a sudden you'll start seeing flowing water. It'll look like a weir, water just pouring over the top," Suhayda said. The water will flood the lakefront, filling up low-lying areas first, and continue its march south toward the river. There would be no stopping or slowing it; pumping systems would be overwhelmed and submerged in a matter of hours.
"Another scenario is that some part of the levee would fail," Suhayda said. "It's not something that's expected. But erosion occurs, and as levees broke, the break will get wider and wider. The water will flow through the city and stop only when it reaches the next higher thing. The most continuous barrier is the south levee, along the river. That's 25 feet high, so you'll see the water pile up on the river levee."

Dara
09-06-2005, 12:13 AM
Tim Russert read some of that article to Chertoff (who called Russert "Timothy," for some reason).

That article says Amid this maelstrom, the estimated 200,000 or more people left behind in an evacuation will be struggling to survive. Some will be housed at the Superdome, the designated shelter in New Orleans for people too sick or infirm to leave the city. Others will end up in last-minute emergency refuges that will offer minimal safety. But many will simply be on their own, in homes or looking for high ground.