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mysteriew
09-10-2005, 12:29 AM
There have been a lot of people to blame since Katrina. But there have been a lot hero's too. I thought we might pay tribute to some of the hero's we hear about. From the people who selflessly gave out their own food and water in the shelter's to the hero's who worked rescuing survivors, the doctors and nurses who stayed with their patients to the rescuers who have poured into the disaster area asking only to help.

Post the stories here as you find them.

I am going to start with one that I found about the staff in hospitals and some of the rescuers who came to help.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Disasters always spawn heroes.

On Sept. 11, 2001, many of them wore dark blue uniforms that said FDNY.

On Sept. 1, 2005, many wore hospital scrubs that said MD, RN and EMT. Thousands of health care workers stayed with patients in devastated hospitals after the storm struck. Thousands more rushed in to help.

They are people like Dr. Norman McSwain, a legendary, 68-year-old Tulane University trauma surgeon who on Sept. 1 waded through fetid floodwaters to get out word that thousands of people were trapped in hospitals running out of food and water.

And Dr. Rich Tabor, a 38-year-old Bethlehem, Pa., emergency medicine physician who got partners to cover his shifts and paid $520 out of his own pocket for a plane ticket to Louisiana, where he climbed into an airboat and went door-to-door with rescue workers.

And Barry Albertson Jr., 42, a paramedic from Easton, Pa., who missed his 7-year-old son's first peewee football game to join a caravan of ambulances making the 30-hour trip to New Orleans.

And Dr. Lee Garvey, 48, an emergency room doctor at Carolinas Medical Center who dropped everything to staff a state-of-the-art mobile hospital that provided the only trauma care for seven devastated counties in rural Mississippi.

"We're here because this is what we live to do," Garvey said, "trying to offer something to these people."

http://www.rednova.com/news/health/235915/doctors_emerging_as_heroes_of_katrina/

mysteriew
09-10-2005, 10:52 AM
NUMEROUS stories are pouring out of Hurricane Katrina, and if federal authorities don’t learn from this disaster, it will be to their shame.

Among those that stand out is the remarkable tale of a 6-year-old named Deamonte Love. After being separated from their families, Deamonte took care of six other children: a 5-month-old, a 14-month-old, three children about 2, and a 3-year-old.

When Deamonte was found in Baton Rouge among other evacuees, he was holding the infant while the other children huddled close to him. The baby is his brother, two are cousins, and the rest lived in the same apartment building.

Deamonte’s mother, Catrina Williams, identified her children on a National Center for Missing & Exploited Children Web site, and they were reunited Sunday. Before then, though, she was in San Antonio, Texas, with the four mothers of the other children.

The families had been trapped in their apartment building for four days, and only separated when a helicopter came. Upon coaxing from her father and because they had run out of milk for the baby, Ms. Williams agreed to the transport of her children to a safer area. Apparently the other mothers followed suit. After all, the helicopter crew promised to return shortly. It didn’t, and the parents ended up in Texas.

Although I wonder why the helicopter didn’t return, it’s good Deamonte promised his mother he would take care of his baby brother. He did that. And more. He is my hero.

http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050910/COLUMNIST24/50910051/-1/NEWS

SieSie
09-10-2005, 10:56 AM
Great thread - I can't wait to start adding to it. I'm sure there are many, many hero's that we will hear about in the days and weeks to come. Thanks for starting this.

mysteriew
09-10-2005, 10:59 AM
Angelo Di Cristina of Chalmette collapsed, crying, onto a chair outside the National Guard armory Friday, his daughter Marella, 8, wrapped in his arms.

His stepson, Christopher Broussard, was one of 100 troops with the 1st Battalion 141st Field Artillery unit that touched down on U.S. soil Friday after serving a year in Iraq.

The plane taxied to a stop under an arc of water streaming from two airport fire and rescue trucks.

In single file, the soldiers left the plane and walked across the tarmac to unfaltering but light applause from a few bystanders and some members of the media. One soldier carried a heart-shaped balloon in the same hand that kept the rifle slung over his shoulder from butting his leg.

Each walked to a building off the tarmac where they would be debriefed and greeted by the governor before boarding buses to a nearby armory where their families waited.

A homecoming without a home

http://www.theadvertiser.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050910/NEWS01/509100312/1002

mysteriew
09-10-2005, 11:01 AM
Great thread - I can't wait to start adding to it. I'm sure there are many, many hero's that we will hear about in the days and weeks to come. Thanks for starting this.

With all of the bad things that are coming out- I just thought we needed to remember the good ones also.

mysteriew
09-10-2005, 11:51 AM
Mississippi Power employees and outside workers have restored service to 98 percent of the company's customers who can receive power.

"Many of the Georgia Power crews have already left to prepare for the potential of Ophelia making landfall somewhere near their home areas, which highlights what a team effort this has been with all members of Southern Company. This miracle could not have been accomplished without much effort and support from the employees of our sister companies."
http://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/2005/sep/1180662.htm

TexMex
09-10-2005, 12:07 PM
Just saw a report on CNN on a Steve Miller. He was an inmate (forgery) in Bay St. Louis, MS. He was out of hs cell when the hurricane hit. He rescued
a policeman who fell as well as the couple the policeman was helping...then he hears two women screaming and goes to find two 70 something ladies-one who had a broken arm from part of a building falling on her--he took off his shirt and made a sling for her arm. Then he found a man trapped in rubble and spent 45 mins digging him out then stayed with the man while he was transported to the hospital--holding his hand in the back of the pick up. (That man died later). Miller later learns that his wife and baby were killed in the storm. The jailers plan to ask the Gov of MS to pardon Miller for his heroics on that terrible day.

concernedperson
09-10-2005, 12:29 PM
Animal rescues lift human spirits

Many kinds of creatures need a hand

Pass Christian,Miss.- The animal rescue team has come back for Nike the cat.
Tramping through the debris left by Hurrican Katrina around the white clapboard house, they see his fresh prints in the dark brown mud. They'll return with a trap, trying to coax him with a can of Friskies.


http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/breaking/katrina/10natkatpets.html

mysteriew
09-10-2005, 12:53 PM
Just saw a report on CNN on a Steve Miller. He was an inmate (forgery) in Bay St. Louis, MS. He was out of hs cell when the hurricane hit. He rescued
a policeman who fell as well as the couple the policeman was helping...then he hears two women screaming and goes to find two 70 something ladies-one who had a broken arm from part of a building falling on her--he took off his shirt and made a sling for her arm. Then he found a man trapped in rubble and spent 45 mins digging him out then stayed with the man while he was transported to the hospital--holding his hand in the back of the pick up. (That man died later). Miller later learns that his wife and baby were killed in the storm. The jailers plan to ask the Gov of MS to pardon Miller for his heroics on that terrible day.

I sure hope they give this guy his pardon. When it came down to it, this guy chose to help, not to join the looters and rabble rousers. He deserves credit for that, no matter his past actions.

SieSie
09-10-2005, 12:58 PM
I sure hope they give this guy his pardon. When it came down to it, this guy chose to help, not to join the looters and rabble rousers. He deserves credit for that, no matter his past actions.
Exactly! Plus, his past crime was apparently forgery - much different than if he were a murderer or sex-offender! This guy is a great example of the human spirit.

Hammerized
09-10-2005, 02:37 PM
Jabbar Gibson, age reported 15-20. He had the stuff, this kid.

School bus comandeered by renegade refugees first to arrive at Astrodome

http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/topstory2/3334317 (http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/topstory2/3334317)



My Hero is a Bus Thief
http://uspolitics.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/metropolitan/3335904




Storm Victims Steal School Buses To Flee New Orleans

http://www.local6.com/news/4929516/detail.html
(http://www.local6.com/news/4929516/detail.html)

Borrowed bus takes victims to Houston

http://www.sciencedaily.com/upi/?feed=TopNews&article=UPI-1-20050901-13001700-bc-us-katrina-comandeered.xml


Teenager snatches bus to save dozens
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2089-1763947,00.html

mysteriew
09-10-2005, 05:02 PM
“I picked up a stranger,” Caldwell said. “Under normal circumstances, that’s something I would have never done.”
But it wasn’t normal circumstances. Caldwell was in the midst of the worst natural disaster to ever hit the United States, and offering a ride to a total stranger in search of infant formula seemed like the right thing to do.”
When disaster hits and everything has been turned upside down — literally — the rules change.

Caldwell not only helped her aunt and uncle in the days to follow with cleanup efforts and obtaining food and water, she also helped other storm victims living in or near the trailer park.
There was the stranger who was needing infant formula. She picked him up and drove him to a charitable distribution service. There were small children in the trailer park who were scared and hungry. She drove to the local Winn Dixie to pick up food for them.
“They were letting people in two at a time at the store,” she said. “The odor was terrible because all the meet had spoiled and was rotten. But we picked up treats for them like cookies.”
Caldwell also stood in an ice distribution line for over three hours in 90-degree weather. On her way back to the trailer park, she saw an old man and blind woman sitting on their front porch.
“I asked them if they had water, and they said no,” she said. “So, I went back and stood in line again for them.”
There were several scenes of compassion Caldwell observed, but there were also scenes of disorder. While standing in line for ice, she saw tempers flare.
“It was hot and there was the real fear that by the time you got to the front of the line, the ice would be gone,” she said. “It was very chaotic, but I have also never seen so many police officers in my life. That was a good thing, though. They had a strong presence, and that was needed to keep the order.”
While driving down I-10 toward Biloxi, swarms of police cruisers were also en route.
“I bet we passed 1,000 cops,” she said. “The entire ordeal was a humbling experience...No matter where you looked, nothing was untouched from that storm, and nobody was unaffected. I don’t care if the houses were big or small, they were all gone.”
http://www.harlandaily.com/reader.cfm?si=1&sd=5879

mysteriew
09-10-2005, 05:10 PM
Americans have raised $587 million since Hurricane Katrina made landfall Aug. 29, surpassing the $239 million donated in the 10 days after 9/11 and the $163 million in the nine days after tsunamis hit Southeast Asia last December, according to The Chronicle of Philanthropy newspaper. Relief centers are overflowing with donations of clothing, food, water and supplies. "People are just pouring their hearts out," said Sarah Marchetti, a Red Cross spokeswoman.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/usatoday/20050909/cm_usatoday/heroescomeinallages%3b_ylt=A9FJqYHhfiJDK7QAfQWs0NU E%3b_ylu=X3oDMTA3YWFzYnA2BHNlYwM3NDI-

mysteriew
09-10-2005, 05:25 PM
With his hands, he tore his way out of his attic.

"I knew no nails were going to keep me in the attic," Traina said.

With 80-mile-per-hour winds blowing outside, Traina jumped into 20 feet of black, polluted and rushing flood water to get to his boat -- which was tied up to his truck and a trailer, wedged underneath a car port and approximately 10 to 15 feet underwater.

"It was a miracle it survived," Traina said of his 24-foot fishing boat, which became the transport that would take hundreds to safety.

After untying his boat and breaking apart the carport, Traina steered his boat to the front of the house to wait for the winds to die down before looking for safer shelter.

"When I drove the boat around the front of the house, I thought I was the only person in the neighborhood. But I saw people coming out of everywhere to get to the boat," Traina said.

When it was safe, Traina drove around and picked up about eight people to take with him to a local high school, one of the shelters that were set up in the area.

Traina knew more people were out there, and he made it his mission to see they made it out alive.

For five days, Traina used more than 370 gallons of gas as he rescued more than 250 people from their homes and brought them to safety. He kept his fishing boat fueled by cutting the gas lines from wrecked and abandoned boats.

Traina, the ultimate outdoorsman, not only spent his days and nights bringing his neighbors to safety, but he tried to provide as much luxury as he could. He befriended the sheriffs department and was deputized, which allowed him to provide food and water to those that came on his boat. And as resourceful as he was, he used the ice from abandoned fishing boats to provide cold water to those he rescued.

As Traina worked to rescue those that chose to stay behind, his family had no idea where he was or if he had even survived.

The Traina's say they have been disgusted with the television coverage of the events in New Orleans. They say there are many more people out there just like Todd, more good people than bad, just fighting to survive.

"They make New Orleans look like a jungle," Traina said. "They're showing burning buildings, that was an attempt to get someone to show up. That's someone fighting for their life."
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=15180465&BRD=1426&PAG=461&dept_id=525682&rfi=6

concernedperson
09-10-2005, 05:28 PM
Serving up food and encouragement to law enforcement

Sat. 3:00 P.M.
By Coleman Warner

Eddie "Eddie Boy" Woemer, an Elberta, Ala. sod grower well known to the New Orleans Saints as a supplier of turf fire up his bid grill at gatherings of his family and friends. Last year he fired it up to cook for emergency workers in Orange Beach, Ala. after Hurricane Ivan hit there.

And he didn't hesitate this weekend to go to New Orleans when a friend called to say that New Orleans Police Officers desperately needed fresh meals at the foot of Canal St., a general staging area for law enforcement. He and a few others arrived at 1 PM Sunday with big cookers and 1000 lbs. of meat, and their mission of serving 800 police officers has swelled dramatically.
http://www.nola.com/newslogs/breakingtp/index.ssf?/mtlogs/nola_Times-Picayune/archives/2005_09_10.html#078701

concernedperson
09-10-2005, 08:49 PM
My hands down award winner is Gen. Honore. He is the man that showed humanity when it was needed and defied the show of force. Exclaiming that this is a humanitarian effort. Barking orders and taking charge and rescuing 60,000 people is the best that we can do as humans.He is the best of humans and should be honored in every way. So, there you go. A human being that is a hero in every way.My hero for probably the rest of my life.

I still love his statement that if the endangered alligators get in the way of his men and their job they won't be endangered they are dead.Alligators and water mocassins aren't cute and they kill people.

concernedperson
09-10-2005, 09:16 PM
Anything for Gen. Honore? Am I the only one?

Tom'sGirl
09-10-2005, 11:33 PM
Anything for Gen. Honore? Am I the only one?
He sounded great CP, but I think most are waiting to see what he will implement into action on his words.

So far I haven't heard much, but maybe it will come out later as things settle down a bit.

I heard today on Fox or could have been CNN that no one has ever been bitten by snakes during a hurricane. Now, the gators are another story maybe as they have had to chase them off from some areas.

mysteriew
09-11-2005, 07:33 AM
George Mitchell's dog may be one of the most unlikely heroes to emerge in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Mitchell, 80, tells CBS News correspondent Cynthia Bowers that Frisky saved his life as Katrina was devastating the landscape.

The mutt, who's nearly blind now, is a schnauzer-poodle mix and, at 19, is the equivalent of 133 in human years. snip

Bowers met Mitchell in a Biloxi hospital, and found Frisky in Mitchell's bed with him. snip

"My little friend and I had a party that night," Mitchell says. "We had a big party. We spent the night treading water and swimming. … This thing (Katrina) was the monster of them all. It had to have come straight from Hell.

"About four hours after I was treading water and all, I was about ready to let go, and I felt this real peaceful feeling, like, 'This is it.' Ya know? And I was about to let go and, all of a sudden, he was on that mattress and come running to the corner of the mattress, and he kissed me and kissed me and kissed me. And it kinda snapped me out of it, and I was able to come back." snip
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/09/09/earlyshow/main829572.shtml

I confess, I cried.

mysteriew
09-11-2005, 07:47 AM
Debbie, who is 47 and uses a wheelchair, had carried her painkillers -- 60 Loratab 10s -- into the attic. And she asked the girls to swallow the pills with her to end the suffering.

"She kept on saying, come on and take 'em," said Tiffany, who marked her 16th birthday in the Baton Rouge River Center shelter on Monday. "I just kept telling her we were going to be saved, but really, I didn't know."

Amanda swayed her mother from suicide by talking about her future.

"I said I want to finish school and have a job and have kids and have a husband," Amanda said.

"She was miraculous. I couldn't believe it," Debbie said of her younger daughter. "I was so proud of her. She just screamed like that for hours and hours. Her and Tiffany kept saying we weren't going to die up here."

Debbie grieves the loss of her mother, who had been her support system all her life, and worries about her brother, who she hasn't heard from since he rescued her and her girls. He stayed behind to help find more people.
http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/09/09/katrina.survivors/index.html

fran
09-11-2005, 11:25 AM
http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/N07180347.htm

Katrina takes emotional toll on exhausted police
07 Sep 2005 18:55:56 GMT

Source: Reuters

.......................................snip....... .....................................


"The New Orleans officers are struggling the most to deal with this," says Claypoole, who works with a team of two other trauma specialists.

"They are not only having to do their jobs powerfully, they are also having to work with the loss and not know what is happening with their families. They are seeing a lot of devastation. They are seeing a lot of things they don't have control over anymore."

New Orleans officials estimate that 70 percent of the city's police officers had their homes destroyed or damaged. As of Monday just 1,000 of the city's 1,641 police members had been accounted for.

The police force has been criticized for desertions during Katrina and for not stopping rampant looting after the storm.

But a furious New Orleans police Chief Edwin Compass stormed into a temporary command center in Baton Rouge earlier this week to defend his officers and deny reports of mass defections.

Working in waist-deep water without food, water and ammunition, officers fought courageously against criminals and looters in the days after Katrina, he shouted at the media in Baton Rouge.

"In the annals of history, no police force was asked to do what we were asked," Compass said.

He acknowledged the death and destruction was too much for a few of his officers, with some walking off the job and two committing suicide.

Many officers, their homes damaged or under water and their families forced to evacuate, stayed on in New Orleans, sleeping on the street with no communications as they tried to maintain order among an increasingly panicked population facing disease, lawlessness, hunger and thirst.

With the bulk of refugees evacuated, firefighters and police are now part of operations to clean up a city in ruins, where people are still trapped in their waterlogged homes and the dead remain.

PUTTING ASIDE PERSONAL WOES

In the state police cafeteria, Claypoole says he has counseled some officers who have contemplated walking off the job. But, he said, "most of them are putting that aside for now and putting their uniforms on to make Louisiana and New Orleans what it needs to be again."

Dealing with displaced families and missing relatives is the biggest trauma for police officers, Claypoole said.

"While everyone else is going about trying to get things back to normal, these people are out doing their jobs and that is a struggle and a stress on them," he said.

Capt. Jim Mitchell of the Louisiana State Police has seen his Baton Rouge house only once since Katrina struck.

"I have been here every day and I haven't been able to even see how badly my house was damaged," he said, gesturing at the command center where hundreds of officials are coordinating rescue and clean-up missions.

"We are all having to do whatever it takes right now and whatever just needs to be done. We have far too many duties for us to even accomplish."

Once things calm down, Mitchell said, officers would be allowed to take a day off occasionally to deal with their own situations.

"Right now we are working nearly everyone seven days a week and longer hours than a regular shift, but not everyone can continue that for a longer period. It's very stressful especially when officers have their own situations and may not even have a house and they have to tend to those personal matters," he added.

fran
09-11-2005, 11:37 AM
Once things calm down, Mitchell said, officers would be allowed to take a day off occasionally to deal with their own situations.

"Right now we are working nearly everyone seven days a week and longer hours than a regular shift, but not everyone can continue that for a longer period. It's very stressful especially when officers have their own situations and may not even have a house and they have to tend to those personal matters," he added.

I don't have a link for this but last night I was watching Rita Cosby who was riding in a car with one of NO's officers. He suddenly got a call from one of his neighbors that someone had broken into his house and was inside now. He took Rita on a 100 MPH ride to his home.

The home was on dry land and boarded up, but the perp had broken down the board on the door. The theif was gone but had trashed the officers house and had stolen all of his wife's jewelery. (the officer had just taken the jewelry back to his home the day before)

It was hard to watch this officer. When Rita asked him how he felt that while he's out protecting and serving the people of NO's, someone is stealing from him. He couldn't answer,.....it was too emotional for him.

FWIW, whoever broke into his house knew he was a NO's police officer, as he had put a note on the door as such. I guess he hoped that would make anyone thinking of breaking in, stop and move on. Guess not. Some people just don't care.

I hope this officer is ok. He was going to spend the night in the back yard of his home,...........protecting his own, alone, in the dark.

JMHO
fran

KrazyKollector
09-11-2005, 11:40 AM
My hands down award winner is Gen. Honore. He is the man that showed humanity when it was needed and defied the show of force. Exclaiming that this is a humanitarian effort. Barking orders and taking charge and rescuing 60,000 people is the best that we can do as humans.He is the best of humans and should be honored in every way. So, there you go. A human being that is a hero in every way.My hero for probably the rest of my life.

I still love his statement that if the endangered alligators get in the way of his men and their job they won't be endangered they are dead.Alligators and water mocassins aren't cute and they kill people.I LOVED that quote from him! He really has done an above outstanding job there. His compassion, mixed with his no nonsense resolve, helped bring order to chaos and hope to the victims.

If he was standing before me, I would give him the biggest hug and then cry my eyes out as I thanked him for being such a wonderful hero and role model.

But, for the rest of my life, every time I think of that quote from him, I'll be thinking also of the "alligator shoes" joke. ;)

mysteriew
09-11-2005, 02:07 PM
The Big Apple has brought the Spirit of Louisiana back to New Orleans.

Louisiana schoolchildren and other citizens raised cash to build and outfit the 1,000 gallon-per-minute pumper truck to Fire Department of New York specifications in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the East Coast. Throughout the state, in schools, fire houses, banks and businesses, Louisiana citizens collected coins and dollars to pay the $500,000 bill and help an American city in crisis.

New York firefighters returned the favor last week and brought the Spirit to Louisiana back at New York's expense to help another American city in crisis.

"They cried and they clapped when they saw it come," FDNY Capt. James Hay of Woodside, Queens, said of New Orleans firefighters.

There are 800 firefighters from Illinois and almost 400 from New York working together with hundreds of first responders from every where United States.

Billy Ladell, an FDNY dispatcher assigned to the field communications unit, reported that Thursday a contingent of 14 support vehicles drove nonstop to New Orleans, covering more than 1,300 miles in two days.

"There are over 350 New York City firefighters who came down here initially. And we had a contingent of 20 to 30 who came down with the Spirit of Louisiana to deliver it back to the people of New Orleans to help them in their time of need," Hay said Saturday.

The Spirit of Louisiana is serving as a symbol of unity, a sign of hope and a necessary work horse.

"We committed the apparatus they gave to us to replace some of our damaged equipment," Hays said. "They can have it working here at this time when their firefighters and New York firefighters are working together. We wanted it to be a little bit of an uplifting spiritual thing."
http://www.shreveporttimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050911/NEWS01/509110326/1002/NEWS

Pepper
09-11-2005, 02:41 PM
http://www.oursportscentral.com/services/releases/?id=3222320

Chris Ryan a hurricane Katrina hero
09/09/05 - Arena Football League (AFL) Philadelphia Soul
"Dad, why are you giving our clothes away to strangers?" asked Chris Ryan's children late last week.

Ryan, a fullback/linebacker for each of the Philadelphia Soul's first two seasons, resides with his family in Lake Charles, LA. The mid-sized town is tucked in the southwestern corner of Louisiana - some 200 miles from the devastation and destruction dealt to New Orleans by Mother Nature. Ryan estimates that "probably 10,000 to 15,000 people" have taken up residence in Lake Charles in the past week as a result of Hurricane Katrina's wrath.

Like many other community buildings currently doubling as housing shelters in the deep south, the Lake Charles Civic Center and Burton Coliseum are now home to hundreds of scared, lost, broken, sick and lonely people. And Ryan, like so many others in this desperate time, believes it is his responsibility to lend a hand.

"I wanted my kids to see this."

Late last week, Ryan led his son, Christopher (9), and daughter, Montoya (6), through a Lake Charles shelter handing out clothes to children in need. Some of the clothes were Christopher's and Montoya's. Others were purchased by Ryan at a local Wal-Mart specifically for this purpose.

"I sat there and had to explain to my kids why we were giving their stuff away to total strangers," Ryan explains. "I wanted them to see this. I wanted them to understand the good we were doing for people who were just devastated." It wasn't an easy sell to his kids at first, he admits. But after Christopher and Montoya began passing out clothes to other kids their age and saw the gratitude in their eyes, they asked their father to go back to the house to find more things to give away.

Ryan, who on a daily basis has been visiting shelters to assist in handing out food, water and supplies, acknowledges he was not very keen on the idea when his step mother initially suggested it. But after seeing the conditions these people are now faced with, he realized his call to duty.

"It bothers me seeing people wearing the same clothes every day," he says. "They don't know if their house is still standing and they didn't even have time to pack suitcases. What they're wearing on their back is all they have."

Jenn
09-11-2005, 02:58 PM
Thank you so much for this thread! There are so many heroes. So many people have opened up to help from donations of their time, money, posessions, homes. It has been such a life changing experience for me. This disaster hit so close to home and to see how much our communities have come together to help is amazing. I have renewed faith that I thought I had lost. This came at a time when it seemed things were the worst. Crime, greed, corruption, you name it. Everyone has put all of that aside and bonded together to help so many that have lost everything. There are so many gripes that not enough was done by this person and that peson and things were not done fast enough. Well, maybe so but what has been done is amazing and I am so thankful and so proud. Complete strangers (including myself and my family) have opened up everything they have and asked for nothing in return. It is a sacrifice of love for families that we may have never known. I can not imagine a more amazing and powerful thing. Thank you. Just being here to witness this has been a gift that I could never express enough gratitide for. It has opened my eyes to what is important in life.

mysteriew
09-11-2005, 03:33 PM
Some of these stories made me cry. But it is a different kind of crying in that they are healing tears.

Following the WTC disaster, that is what helped me- watching the support and the giving. I just wanted to make sure everyone got that same chance to see it happening, maybe it would help someone else. Please if you find a hero story, please add it. If you know of a hero story, please share it.

concernedperson
09-11-2005, 03:53 PM
Roswell family opens house to multitude of strangers

Carol and Boake Moore live in a big house overlooking the Chattahoochee River in Roswell. So, after several days of following the misery in New Orleans, they went ionline and posted an offer to take in a family that had fled Hurricane Katrina.

A young man named Myron Celestine called. His family is from the Desire Street neighborhood, one of the poorest in New Orleans. They had barely made it out of there alive, and were on the way to Atlanta.

How many are you? Carol asked. Eight, Myron said. Then he added: "We have nothing."

The group arrived the morning of Sept. 3 - eight adults and 3 young children. Myron hadn't mentioned the children.

Oh, and the basketball team he coaches at Desire St. Ministries was on its way, too. Eleven 6 footers. And two of the players girlfriends. One has a 13 month old child and the other was 18 and 5 months pregnant
http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/breaking/katrina/11katfamily.html


.

fran
09-14-2005, 11:47 AM
CD:
What a beautiful story. I challenge anyone to read it without a tear in their eye.
Life can be good! :)

JMHO
fran

Hammerized
09-15-2005, 11:53 AM
Three heroes and the brutal banality of bureaucracy
http://www.townhall.com/columnists/kathleenparker/kp20050914.shtml


Katrina's detritus will be months in the sifting, but what best reveals what went wrong may be found in the contrast between bureaucrats ensnared in red tape and three individuals who sprang into action as circumstances required.

Their names are Deamonte Love, Jabbar Gibson and Sheriff Warren C. Evans...

tired.old.hag
09-15-2005, 04:03 PM
mysterview, thank you so much for this thread.

My son and I saw a guy on the news from the projects in New Orleans at the edge of the water where the people from the projects were walking out. The guy said it was a 2 to 3 mile walk through the water to where they got out on I-10 where all those people were gathered.

This guy was going back in the water after walking all that way himself, and grabbing people who were old or sick and helping them the last of the way out of the water. He kept brushing off the reporter and ended the interview saying he had to save the people.

Two days later he was on the news again (different reporter). He had a group of 18 children there on I-10 with him. He said that he had finally walked all the way back to the projects when he saw how many old, sick people, and people with children having such a hard time getting out. So he walked all the way back in to the projects through the water.

When he got there, a group of women who had 18 children among them didn't know how they would get out with all the children. They asked him to take their children, and they would walk out themselves. So he put the 18 children on a makeshift raft and pulled them 3 miles through that awful water.

At the time he was on the news this second time, he said he had been taking care of the 18 children for 2 days, and there was still no sign of the mothers. He said they should have gotten there a few hours after he did, but no sign of them. So he was taking care of all 18 children, mostly babies and toddlers, trying to find diapers and formula for them. It was just unbelievable.

In this interview, he never once mentioned any of the other people he had saved. He just was worried about the mothers.

What a kind and giving heart this man has. He's my #1 hero. I haven't seen another single thing in the news about him, but I'll never forget him. I'm not a religious person, but this is what angels are to me. People who perform phenomenal kindnesses without seeking recognition.

concernedperson
11-26-2005, 06:26 PM
I just hate it when the hero turns around to be another punk. Commandering the bus was one of his attributes because he was pretty experienced at being just that. Arrested again!

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,176771,00.html

dakini
11-26-2005, 07:01 PM
http://www.katrina-hurricane.biz/hurricane-katrina-heroes.htm

I would like to add Jimmy Carter, Rosa Parks, Cindy Sheehan and Senator Murtha to the hero list. My favorites this year are the 12 NYC fellows listed below. Give these ordinary guys a Nobel Peace Prize, they are my heroes...

13 paramedics took themselves, no sponsors, no help, to the
areas of Pakistan that were destroyed and isolated by the
earthquake. They are there treating people who would
otherwise have no help, working without water and
electricity, saving lives, winning the hearts and minds of
the people. I say give them a Nobel Peace Prize. They are
true heroes.
http://teachers.net/mentors/politics/topic3805/11.13.05.16.42.48.html (http://teachers.net/mentors/politics/topic3805/11.13.05.16.42.48.html)

One person can make a difference!
http://myhero.com/myhero/