PDA

View Full Version : The Missing and Unidentified



laini
11-03-2005, 03:19 PM
I hope this is the right place to post this. It is more of a general thought on all cold cases than a specific case. When I look at all the missing adults' photos and names on the National Center for Missing Adults website, and then look at all the unidentified bodies on the doenetwork, I wonder how many match right now. They must match. There are SO MANY. So many look familiar. Where do you begin and how can we match them up. I know there are many people doing just that and the doenetwork works hard solving these cases.

I am afraid of sounding obsessed, but I feel I would need to print up all the missing adults pictures and then go through the unidentified persons to try to match them, but how else can this be done? The family isnt always able to do an internet search, nor are the local police doing it sometimes. Does anybody else feel this way? Am I the only one who thinks the answers are there right now for many cases?

thanks for any thoughts you have,

laini

shadowangel
11-03-2005, 03:35 PM
I'm having a bad day, after my experience with the NJ State Police (see the Blairstown Jane Doe thread). An aggravation of mine is the fact that law enforcement refuses to recoginize the resource available to them. How many of us are there that go through site after site after site...Doe Network, Charley Project, newspaper archives... searching for the missing pieces of their investigations? We don't carry badges, but is that really necessary for what I am talking about, "sleuthing" in the 21st century? Those of us on this site alone network very well throughout the world, and have developed truly plausible theories and matches that, unfortunately, we don't have the resources to follow up on.
A concentrated effort on the part of the media and an updated attitude on the part of law enforcement would go a long way to resolving many of the cases we ourselves discuss. A massive expansion of the NCMEC, giving it more resources to follow up on the tips and suggestions made by people like us--a centralized information center, if you will, with the scope of the Office of Homeland Security--would be a serious help.
Shadowangel's opinion.

KatherineQ
11-03-2005, 03:58 PM
Liani - I know just how you feel.

I've gone through all the information in the "unidentified" section, and read it several times each case.

It's unbelievable. Some of those cases sound like transients, and the family never knew what happened to them, and probably won't ever take the time to look.

Some of the others, though, sound like they were living completely normal lives, well-dressed, well-groomed, and then they were killed and no one ever attempted to find them.

But I also think when I read through some of them, they've gotten a detail so completely wrong (age, date of death, etc. ) that it keeps them from being identified - they are ruled out by searchers as not a possibility.

Best wishes with trying to cross-match them. I did send in a couple thoughts on several of them, but they were pretty long-shots.

pugsley
11-03-2005, 04:20 PM
I'm having a bad day, after my experience with the NJ State Police (see the Blairstown Jane Doe thread). An aggravation of mine is the fact that law enforcement refuses to recoginize the resource available to them. How many of us are there that go through site after site after site...Doe Network, Charley Project, newspaper archives... searching for the missing pieces of their investigations? We don't carry badges, but is that really necessary for what I am talking about, "sleuthing" in the 21st century? Those of us on this site alone network very well throughout the world, and have developed truly plausible theories and matches that, unfortunately, we don't have the resources to follow up on.
A concentrated effort on the part of the media and an updated attitude on the part of law enforcement would go a long way to resolving many of the cases we ourselves discuss. A massive expansion of the NCMEC, giving it more resources to follow up on the tips and suggestions made by people like us--a centralized information center, if you will, with the scope of the Office of Homeland Security--would be a serious help.
Shadowangel's opinion.

I hear ya Shadowangel. I've had those days. I've had lack of communication when there was positive news to get back to me with. And found out through other means.

I'm sure we are not alone either.

Marilynilpa
11-03-2005, 05:15 PM
I hope this is the right place to post this. It is more of a general thought on all cold cases than a specific case. When I look at all the missing adults' photos and names on the National Center for Missing Adults website, and then look at all the unidentified bodies on the doenetwork, I wonder how many match right now. They must match. There are SO MANY. So many look familiar. Where do you begin and how can we match them up. I know there are many people doing just that and the doenetwork works hard solving these cases.

I am afraid of sounding obsessed, but I feel I would need to print up all the missing adults pictures and then go through the unidentified persons to try to match them, but how else can this be done? The family isnt always able to do an internet search, nor are the local police doing it sometimes. Does anybody else feel this way? Am I the only one who thinks the answers are there right now for many cases?

thanks for any thoughts you have,

laini
I certainly understand your frustration. If I were independently wealthy, I would spend my time trying to match up missing adults with descriptions of unidentified adults. But as it is, I just spend some of my spare time doing that.

The various missing persons websites do a great job, but often they are not given much to go on by law enforcement.

I agree with you that the solution to a lot of missing persons cases is out there, just waiting to be found.

reportertype
11-03-2005, 09:23 PM
I add my agreement. I saw an older thread on this forum about Hillsborough Co. Sheriff's Office starting a cold-case squad with a part-time retired detective a volunteers from the community. I would love to work on something like that. I hope it's an idea that catches on with agencies, though I'm sure some LE won't want ordinary folks messing with files and such. But I think it's a great idea.

Richard
11-03-2005, 10:30 PM
Liani - I know just how you feel.
I've gone through all the information in the "unidentified" section, and read it several times each case. ...
But I also think when I read through some of them, they've gotten a detail so completely wrong (age, date of death, etc. ) that it keeps them from being identified - they are ruled out by searchers as not a possibility....
You make a very important point here. There are some bits of information that are unknown, mistyped, or just bad estimates to begin with. You have to take everything with a grain of salt, and NOT rule out anything when trying to make matches.

Only a short time ago, there was a Doenetwork match in which the estimated age of the unknown person was about 20 years off.

The "art" and "science" of matching unknowns to missing persons will improve as more older cases are entered into the system, and a better way of "sorting" on that information is developed. What is in the various data bases that you see on line is only the tip of the iceberg in a way. There are many many more missing persons NOT listed, and the same is true for many unknown bodies. But the good news is that more older cases are being added all the time.

marylandmissing
11-04-2005, 12:07 PM
I'm having a bad day, after my experience with the NJ State Police (see the Blairstown Jane Doe thread). An aggravation of mine is the fact that law enforcement refuses to recoginize the resource available to them. How many of us are there that go through site after site after site...Doe Network, Charley Project, newspaper archives... searching for the missing pieces of their investigations? We don't carry badges, but is that really necessary for what I am talking about, "sleuthing" in the 21st century? Those of us on this site alone network very well throughout the world, and have developed truly plausible theories and matches that, unfortunately, we don't have the resources to follow up on.
A concentrated effort on the part of the media and an updated attitude on the part of law enforcement would go a long way to resolving many of the cases we ourselves discuss. A massive expansion of the NCMEC, giving it more resources to follow up on the tips and suggestions made by people like us--a centralized information center, if you will, with the scope of the Office of Homeland Security--would be a serious help.
Shadowangel's opinion.
Shadow, this is all true. However, there are a lot of laws coming about right now that likely affect "why." Due to the President's DNA initiative, a lot of money is being pumped into dna testing for UIDs and missing. For the last year, law enforcement specialists all over the country have been meeting to discuss the Model Legislation of the missing, which is being enacted in all states soon. NCMEC works closely with police departments, they have been a part of the National Strategy meetings, and are pushing the Child Safety Act of 2005...Not saying this to make it sound like they shouldn't, but just saying that a lot of law enforcement sees drastic changes coming to solve these cold-cases.

LButler
11-04-2005, 12:31 PM
I too look at the unidentified people sections and think, dear god, these people had mothers and fathers, family of some sort, somewhere, people they worked with or encountered in their day-to-day lives....does someone not notice them being GONE? However, I think many of these cases, the only ones that can ID them may be responsible for them being DEAD and therefore, they're not gonna talk.

I think one fact that slips from everyone's mind is that most police dept's are understaffed. Current crime and paperwork doesn't take a break so that they can devote all their manpower to solving an old crime. It probably takes a truly dedicated police person with a mind like ours here (we just have to figure it out) to keep digging on these old (or older) cases. Hence, they should be thrilled that people like us are working so hard on some of these things.

I e-mailed in a tip on a missing person from my area and I got a personalized response from the police chief who was passing it on to the detective handling the case. I have not heard an update yet. What is everyone's thought on following up? What is a reasonable amount of time to follow up?

And, here's a big one for me. Let's just say that you do phone in tip that leads to a postive id (I'm not that confident on this one, I've just been thinking) and what if there was a reward in connection to that kind of info? What would be protocol on accepting that? I would feel so guilty taking the money because I don't think any of us do this for the money. Any thoughts from others? Ever been in that situation and what did you do?

mysteriew
11-04-2005, 12:50 PM
I sent in one tip- sent it to the Ontario Police and to the local sheriff handling the missing person case. Never heard back from either one.

There is one thing we can do right now though. I posted some info in the missing forum re: the push being on to establish a national DNA database, and the need to require DNA testing on all unidentified remains which are found. We can support this by contacting our senator's, and representatives. Because it is going to costs big bucks- they are going to need to know that we are behind the expenditure. Take a look at the articles:
http://websleuths.com/forums/showthread.php?t=31583

laini
11-04-2005, 02:10 PM
So many good points! Thanks for replying, everybody.

:) laini

annemc2
11-04-2005, 03:00 PM
You know, I thought about that once, like what would I do if I was offered reward money for solving a case (cold or otherwise). I would totally find a worthwhile cause related to the missing (DoeNetwork or Project Jason or something similar) and donate all of it. Knowing that the money would be used to help solve other cases would be the greatest reward. (cheesy, yes, but true! :blushing: )

shadowangel
11-05-2005, 06:46 AM
You know, I thought about that once, like what would I do if I was offered reward money for solving a case (cold or otherwise). I would totally find a worthwhile cause related to the missing (DoeNetwork or Project Jason or something similar) and donate all of it. Knowing that the money would be used to help solve other cases would be the greatest reward. (cheesy, yes, but true! :blushing: )
Not cheesy at all. I think that is where the money should go.
There are certainly things we can all do. As suggested, write your local legislators. Visit your local PD to see what can be done in the commmunity-our town has the same yearly festival that all towns do, and through enough nagging and pushing (and politically connected in-laws!) I was able to convince our town's PD to set up a kids' ID booth. They now fingerprint and photograph the kids, giving the parents an "ID card" of sorts that can help in the case of an abduction. They can also collect DNA swabs at the parent's request. This year, they even posted pictures of local missing people and had someone on hand to answer questions. It was a great success, in my opinion. Will it make a big difference in the long run? Time will tell, but if it helps raise awareness of the issue, it will have been worth it.
Money should not, and can not, be an issue here, and its up to us to make that clear.
Identifying remains is not just important in giving the families "closure", but also in identifying the person(s) responsible and making sure they don't have the opportunity to hurt anyone else.

We are at war for the safety of our children, folks, and at this point I feel like the pedophiles and child murderers (and their enablers) are winning. Can there really be anything more important in our society today?

LButler
11-05-2005, 11:54 AM
shadowangel ... good work on the kids' booth at your festival. I think our local LE does a pretty good job on that. They used to go out to the grade schools fairly early in the school year and fingerprint... the first graders (I think). Anyway, parents (even adults need to do this) need to be drilled on the importance of keeping GOOD, EASY TO SEE, CLOSE-UP photos of their kids and updating them about every 6 months or so. It's sad to see on the "missing" files that the only photos available for some people are very poor. Also, if I were a parent and my kid had a distinguishing birth mark or a scar, I would take a very detailed picture of that as well.

shadowangel
11-05-2005, 12:28 PM
I would get my kids Lo-Jacked, if I could. To me, I see child abduction as a form of terrorism in a way...My 14 year-old wants to walk from to school to a friend's home, just a few short blocks away, and I can't do it because I am so afraid of what might happen (and my kid's a monster---5'10 and over 180 pounds...)

Ken
12-01-2005, 12:09 AM
This is an interesting topic...

It's amazing that Vegas has face recognition software and yet as a society, this technology hasn't been put to use to identify the missing and bring them home.

We are dealing with an epidemic here. I don't believe that law enforcement alone can stop this epidemic. They can't even stop domestic violence. In Michigan, domestic violence takes place in one out of every three homes. Of course, domestic violence is another epidemic in and of itself. This country is experiencing an epidemic of indifference and lethargy.

The catch 22 is that the vast majority of people don't care. They really don't. They want to be entertained. For example, the Natalee Holloway story is pure entertainment. What will Van Der Sloot do next? Tune in next week...

Laini, I do admire your obsession about missing people and unidentified bodies. However, you lack imagination and creativity. You don't think outside the box and you play it way too safe. It's a losing combination.

What I find truly annoying about you is that you are capable of so much more and yet you manage to underachieve.

Ken

mysteriew
12-01-2005, 02:19 AM
This is an interesting topic...

It's amazing that Vegas has face recognition software and yet as a society, this technology hasn't been put to use to identify the missing and bring them home.

We are dealing with an epidemic here. I don't believe that law enforcement alone can stop this epidemic. They can't even stop domestic violence. In Michigan, domestic violence takes place in one out of every three homes. Of course, domestic violence is another epidemic in and of itself. This country is experiencing an epidemic of indifference and lethargy.

Ken

It is funny you should bring this up. I have been thinking the last couple of days. They use the facial recognition technology in many different ways. One of the major ones is in watching for terrorists to come into the country through the airlines.
If they had the technology installed at the missing and exploited, doe network, and North American missing organizations- I wonder how successful it would be with matching to the sketches and reconstructions they do? Or could software be developed that takes the measurements they use in the reconstructions, and somehow use it in making comparisons of pictures of the missing? I don't know enough about the technology aspect to know if this is already being used, or if anyone is working on it. But if they had something like this, and loaded the various databases and ran checks on all of them, it could make the process so much faster.

Richard
12-01-2005, 09:55 AM
It is funny you should bring this up. I have been thinking the last couple of days. They use the facial recognition technology in many different ways. One of the major ones is in watching for terrorists to come into the country through the airlines.
If they had the technology installed at the missing and exploited, doe network, and North American missing organizations- I wonder how successful it would be with matching to the sketches and reconstructions they do? Or could software be developed that takes the measurements they use in the reconstructions, and somehow use it in making comparisons of pictures of the missing? I don't know enough about the technology aspect to know if this is already being used, or if anyone is working on it. But if they had something like this, and loaded the various databases and ran checks on all of them, it could make the process so much faster.
You put forward some very interesting points and are years ahead in your thinking! I think that everyone has been frustrated in one way or another when trying to search the databases that you mention - often because the authors of the sites have not fully considered basic sorting techniques. There is a lot of information available, but to access it often requires the old eyeball scan.

Each website could make an immediate improvement if it would include a section on how to scan/sort it. For instance: if you wanted to try to find a match in the Missing Persons with a John Doe, age 20 to 30, height between 5ft 10in and 6ft, with brown hair who died before January 1986 - there should be a way to use the computer to ask that information of the Missing Person data base. Each website has its own databases and some have sortable categories, while others only have text.

There are some folks who are very good at getting into the data bases and searching them, and perhaps a topic here in Websleuths could be added with links to various websites and instructions and tips on how to best use them.

Face recognition software could be used in some cases very easily. For instance, there are some cases where actual photos (taken while living) exist of unknowns. And then there are morgue photos of some unknowns which would be more difficult to match to photos of living persons. I think that it would be very difficult to try to match most artist renditions to photos of missing persons. But anything is worth a try, and it seems that this may be a valuable tool in the future.

Marilynilpa
12-01-2005, 10:31 AM
I posted this on another thread, but it seems appropriate to post it here as well, since we're discussing our frustrations about matching missing people to missing unidentified victims.

"It's as if America fought a secret war and suffered tens of thousands of casualties, each an unknown soldier buried in an unmarked grave.

Missing-person experts estimate that the bodies of 40,000 to 50,000 unidentified men, women and children have been found by police during the past 50 years. These John, Jane and Baby Does were sent to local coroners and medical examiners for examination and then anonymously buried or cremated.

Most are murder victims. But in what one expert calls "a silent crisis," the vast majority of unidentified bodies go unreported to state or federal authorities, according to a Scripps Howard News Service study of confidential FBI records."

The link for the complete article is:
http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs...EWS01/510290372

I don't know what we can do to change this, but it should be mandatory that ALL unidentified bodies are reported to state or federal authorities.

The information on sites such as the Doe Network is helpful when we try to match a missing person with an unidentified body, but obviously there are a great many unidentified bodies who never make it onto the Doe Network and similar sites.

Richard
12-01-2005, 11:39 AM
...The information on sites such as the Doe Network is helpful when we try to match a missing person with an unidentified body, but obviously there are a great many unidentified bodies who never make it onto the Doe Network and similar sites.
Very true of both Unidentified bodies AND Missing persons. If you look at the Doenetwork Chronological listings of Unidentified bodies, you will see that there are many more in recent years, and fewer and fewer as you go back in time. This is because references to those Unidentified bodies are buried in paper files, news clippings, and family memories.

Compounding the problem of making matches is Doenetwork's own policy of NOT including Missing Persons until Seven years have passed. By anyone's definition, it makes them all Cold Cases from the day they are listed.

That said, one needs to realize that ten years ago, nothing like this even existed, so it is a developing resource. If you check daily update sections of those websites, you will see that they are constantly being updated. If anyone has information from concerning a Missing Person or an Unidentified Body that is NOT in the data base, write it up and send it in to them.

Marilynilpa
12-01-2005, 12:21 PM
A sad fact about unidentified bodies is that many of them are probably transients, prostitutes, runaways - people who may have lost touch with their families/friends over the years for whatever reason. They may drift from one town to another, from state to state. Even if someone does become concerned and wants to report them missing, they usually have no idea when or where the person was last seen. Things like that make it hard when we try to match up missing persons with Jane or John Does.I read last week that some of the Green River Killer's victims have never been identified, even though the police have posted photographs of the women. This is an example of what I'm talking about - the families may not even know these women have died. As prostitutes, they moved from place to place, and probably didn't contact their families very often, if at all.

mysteriew
12-01-2005, 02:13 PM
A sad fact about unidentified bodies is that many of them are probably transients, prostitutes, runaways - people who may have lost touch with their families/friends over the years for whatever reason. They may drift from one town to another, from state to state. Even if someone does become concerned and wants to report them missing, they usually have no idea when or where the person was last seen. Things like that make it hard when we try to match up missing persons with Jane or John Does.I read last week that some of the Green River Killer's victims have never been identified, even though the police have posted photographs of the women. This is an example of what I'm talking about - the families may not even know these women have died. As prostitutes, they moved from place to place, and probably didn't contact their families very often, if at all.

While I can agree with you in part, think of all the missing persons cases we know of (and we don't catch them all). Many are children, many have no known connections to drugs. And many are never found even after many, many years have gone by. My theory is that many of them were taken to a different state, where they were eventually listed as an unknown, and advertised locally. Then buried in an unknown grave, because there is no requirement for them to do DNA testing, or to report the body to any national authority. The number of unknowns being buried, with no national attempt of identifing is overwhelming.

Marilynilpa
12-01-2005, 02:44 PM
While I can agree with you in part, think of all the missing persons cases we know of (and we don't catch them all). Many are children, many have no known connections to drugs. And many are never found even after many, many years have gone by. My theory is that many of them were taken to a different state, where they were eventually listed as an unknown, and advertised locally. Then buried in an unknown grave, because there is no requirement for them to do DNA testing, or to report the body to any national authority. The number of unknowns being buried, with no national attempt of identifing is overwhelming.
I certainly didn't mean that all missings persons cases (or unidentified bodies) fall into the category of transient, prostitute, runaway, etc. I was simply pointing out that people who fall into that category can disappear without anyone immediately raising an alarm. It could be months, or even years, before their families report them as missing. In the meantime, if their unidentified body is found in another city or state, the chances of matching that missing person to the unidentified body diminishes.

The article I posted a link to (see post #19) really opened my eyes about how unidentified bodies are handled, i.e., local authorities aren't required to report them to any other authority. While that is discouraging to people like us who try, through this forum and others, to match missing persons to Jane and John Does, it certainly doesn't deter us from trying.

LButler
12-01-2005, 03:47 PM
I really think that someone could "run away" from their family, move around alot, not make any real close, personal relationships, die at some point and never be positively id'ed. Some people change so much in their looks as they age (watched American Justice last night about David Davison .... never would have known that was the same man as his younger photos, amazing). And, I think that could happen even if they were reported missing. I think it would account for a very small number of bodies.

marilynilpa ... I do agree that a large percentage of un id'ed bodies are just as you said - runaways, prostitutes, transients...

LButler
12-01-2005, 03:50 PM
My post sounds stupid now that I reread it. My runaway story makes them a runaway. So, let me say that I think of a runaway as a minor child who just wants out of the house for whatever reason.

In my runaway story, I'm thinking more of an adult who chooses to "walk away" from their life, responsibilities....could live a false life and die without a real identity. I guess that would be a "walkaway."

Maybe I'll just shut up!!

mysteriew
12-01-2005, 04:01 PM
I wonder if a lot of the missing kids aren't alive out there some way? Of the UID bodies they find, most are adult. UID children are advertised more than adult. Yet, a lot of the missing kids are never found. When I think of Steven Staynor, and Sharon Marshall I wonder if those who are kidnapped at a young age, could possibly be alive out there some way. Maybe living under false identities, and not remembering where they came from.
Or feeling so used up or afraid that they don't attempt to find their way home.

Marilynilpa
12-01-2005, 04:53 PM
I wonder if a lot of the missing kids aren't alive out there some way? Of the UID bodies they find, most are adult. UID children are advertised more than adult. Yet, a lot of the missing kids are never found. When I think of Steven Staynor, and Sharon Marshall I wonder if those who are kidnapped at a young age, could possibly be alive out there some way. Maybe living under false identities, and not remembering where they came from.
Or feeling so used up or afraid that they don't attempt to find their way home.
I don't know if "a lot" of them are alive, but I feel certain that some of them are. As you said, children who are kidnapped at a young age may have been raised by their abductor and cannot remember who they really are, or where they came from. It's possible that as the children get older, they are killed to keep them from figuring out their true identity. Or they could be killed because their abductor only likes young children, not older kids or teens. Some of the unidentified Jane Does could be missing children, all grown up. In those cases, it would probably take DNA testing to verify that an unidentified adult Jane Doe is actually a "missing child".

Also, I have heard about children being kidnapped and sold into pedophile rings here and abroad. I don't know if this is true or not, but if it is true, that could explain where some children are. If this happened to a child, it's possible that they would feel too damaged to return to their family.

Finally, some of the missing children might be living happy lives, blissfully unaware that they have been abducted.

shadowangel
12-02-2005, 06:29 AM
I would agree "some" may still be alive, but I don't feel its many. I have ran across cases, some posted here on other threads, of abducted children found with their kidnappers living under assumed names-the children had not, at least to that point, been harmed in any way.

Unfortunately, the grim truth is that a child's body is easier to dispose of than an adults-the body can be placed into an object, such as an ice chest, and buried, or simply taken into parts of the woods where no one ever ventures-the light body of a child is easier to carry much farther than an adult's, which most likley will be left near a roadway or simply rolled down a ravine.

laini
12-02-2005, 04:26 PM
Don't shut up, LButler. I know what your saying. On a side note, I don't understand how women can "runaway" with children still at home, and not at least call or eventually come back. It blows my mind, but I know it happens.

There was a missing young woman who was listed on all the missing sites last year and I was very interested in it. It turns out she left and started a new life and didn't want to be found. She was a professional career woman and doing fine she said (according to LE). She didn't have children left behind. But I wonder if there are many more missing people who truely left for good and never looked back, and who are listed on missing people sites.

reportertype
12-03-2005, 03:06 AM
I would agree "some" may still be alive, but I don't feel its many. I have ran across cases, some posted here on other threads, of abducted children found with their kidnappers living under assumed names-the children had not, at least to that point, been harmed in any way.

Unfortunately, the grim truth is that a child's body is easier to dispose of than an adults-the body can be placed into an object, such as an ice chest, and buried, or simply taken into parts of the woods where no one ever ventures-the light body of a child is easier to carry much farther than an adult's, which most likley will be left near a roadway or simply rolled down a ravine.

At one time, what mysteriew suggests might have been possible. I know in the 1920s to as late as the 1950s many children were stolen and later sold as part of adoption/orphanage house scams. But these days, I fear most of them are dead and hidden. I hate to admit it, but I was incredibly shocked when Elizabeth Smart was found alive. Relieved, but shocked.

wondering22
05-25-2006, 03:28 PM
Some time during the last year, I read a really interesting news article about a teenager who had been adopted. He sent a sample of his own DNA to a genaeology research place that he found online, and they were able to match his DNA to a specific surname.

Sorry, but I don't remember all the details, but IIRC, he was able to locate his bio-dad.

Now..... if a teenager could do that.... what might the pros be able to do, were they to send in DNA samples to the same place which matches DNA to surnames?

mysteriew
05-25-2006, 09:05 PM
Was that the Genome project? I think it was National Geographic, I posted an article down in the geneology forum on that.

mysteriew
05-25-2006, 09:09 PM
Was that the Genographic project? I think it was National Geographic, I posted an article down in the geneology forum on that.
https://www5.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/journey.html

outofthedark
05-29-2006, 01:28 PM
Liani - I know just how you feel.

I've gone through all the information in the "unidentified" section, and read it several times each case.

It's unbelievable. Some of those cases sound like transients, and the family never knew what happened to them, and probably won't ever take the time to look.

Some of the others, though, sound like they were living completely normal lives, well-dressed, well-groomed, and then they were killed and no one ever attempted to find them.

But I also think when I read through some of them, they've gotten a detail so completely wrong (age, date of death, etc. ) that it keeps them from being identified - they are ruled out by searchers as not a possibility.

Best wishes with trying to cross-match them. I did send in a couple thoughts on several of them, but they were pretty long-shots.

I've done that too- I look through missing persons that I find and see if they match my John Doe or any other UID cases that I can remember facts from.

Whenever I try and find a match, I type in any keywords from the UID case and see if the search comes up with anything. I usually type in the race, height or anything like a scar or injury to see if anything comes up...

I, however get frustrated easily whenever a possible match comes up and doesn't quite match anything I am looking for...

I did come up with an idea to make a video with the sketches/photos of UID's when they were still alive along with information about the UID's- but unfortunatley- I can't do this because I don't have a video making program and the only way I could do this is through the computer programs at school- providing I can remember how to use a specific program

mysteriew
05-29-2006, 02:05 PM
I did come up with an idea to make a video with the sketches/photos of UID's when they were still alive along with information about the UID's- but unfortunatley- I can't do this because I don't have a video making program and the only way I could do this is through the computer programs at school- providing I can remember how to use a specific program
Some community broadcast or cable stations allow for "community" broadcast time or "local programming". Most of the time it is used for local ministers to use for broadcasting their church services. But I am wondering if something could be worked out through them? And they may have the needed equipment also.

welder 79
05-29-2006, 04:55 PM
good idea!!! that's what community broadcast time is set a side for..

outofthedark
05-29-2006, 06:36 PM
Some community broadcast or cable stations allow for "community" broadcast time or "local programming". Most of the time it is used for local ministers to use for broadcasting their church services. But I am wondering if something could be worked out through them? And they may have the needed equipment also.
I was actually thinking about posting it on YouTube if I ever get around to making a video- alot of people are on YouTube, so it might attract alot of viewers.

Zanko
08-19-2007, 04:29 PM
It is funny you should bring this up. I have been thinking the last couple of days. They use the facial recognition technology in many different ways. One of the major ones is in watching for terrorists to come into the country through the airlines.
If they had the technology installed at the missing and exploited, doe network, and North American missing organizations- I wonder how successful it would be with matching to the sketches and reconstructions they do? Or could software be developed that takes the measurements they use in the reconstructions, and somehow use it in making comparisons of pictures of the missing? I don't know enough about the technology aspect to know if this is already being used, or if anyone is working on it. But if they had something like this, and loaded the various databases and ran checks on all of them, it could make the process so much faster.

I'm glad I found this thread. I have thought a lot about the software from Homeland Security and how it may be applied to help with missing persons. Maybe the overwhelming number of those missing would make this impractical, but what about using it for AMBER ALERTS and recent missing/abducted? It would be wonderful if this was at least attempted. It wasn't long ago that the idea of a national database on DNA was a dream and before that when a national database of fingerprints was beyond imagination. Anyone else thinking about this? Can anyone think of how this might work, or why it wouldn't work? I'd love to brainstorm this idea.

AfterMidnight
08-30-2007, 01:59 PM
Glad you resurrected this thread, I find it interesting to say the least.

I don't believe any national database which collects fingerprints of EVERYONE would be a good idea. Would work great for missing and UID however.

I'm wondering why we don't start our own group right here to work on cases. There seems to be no lack of VERY talented people.

Feedback anyone?

Kelly
08-31-2007, 01:25 PM
For close to two years now, I have begged for volunteers for the Campaign for the Missing (http://www.projectjason.org/legislation.html). While it's not the magic pill or resolution for all that ails our cause, having it in place would put us much closer to a remedy. This, in combination with the new NamUs sites, can start to bring us out of the dark ages when it comes to the missing and unidentified.

There are already some working on national legislation, but that may be harder and take longer. We knew back in 2005 when we met with all the gov, FBI, ME's, LE, Coroners, scientists, etc in Philadelphia about this, that it was not going to be an overnight solution. Each step brings us closer. Anyway, in the meantime, we need serious and dedicated people to help get it passed at state level. (see link above)

diamondgirl
09-06-2007, 10:06 AM
I just had a thought (it might seem silly, but what the heck?) My husband is studying different faiths, and I got to thinking. I wonder if any of the UID may be Amish. I was thinking mainly the young UIDs. Maybe they are in their Rumspringa or chose to leave. I looked into it, and I found a few sources that said 90% of teens chose to be baptized into the AMish. Would that make sense that 10% chose not to? These people would, with out a doubt, be harder to identify. I mean, I haven't seen or heard of about 95% of the missing people I've seen on here.... Witnesses may even state them as having an accent. Plus, they probably are pretty naive (generally speaking)... Just a thought.

Richard
09-06-2007, 08:57 PM
...I wonder if any of the UID may be Amish. I was thinking mainly the young UIDs. Maybe they are in their Rumspringa or chose to leave. I looked into it, and I found a few sources that said 90% of teens chose to be baptized into the AMish. Would that make sense that 10% chose not to? These people would, with out a doubt, be harder to identify. ....

While it is certainly possible that some of the unidentified/unknown bodies could be Amish, I would think that it would be a very very small number.

There are people who are raised Amish, who decide for one reason or another to separate from the Amish community and faith. But it is more likely a case of them wanting to marry an outsider, or perhaps a desire to pursue a career not supported by the Amish, rather than a case of them turning to a life of drugs, crime, or becoming a teenage runaway - generally the more common elements in many of these cases.

In an Amish community, everyone knows everyone else, and if someone were to go missing, there would be inquiries. They also contact the police in their area for assistance and would report a missing person.