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shadowraiths
03-18-2006, 08:25 PM
Greetings all, I have finished writing the "Highway of Tears (http://www.shadowraiths.net/?p=31)" article which also includes a crimemap.

If you have feedback, comments, suggestions, (especially) corrections and/or additional information please do not hesitate to respond to the comments section of the article (or here).

NB: article comments are moderated, but only to prevent spam bots. All/any feedback is welcomed.

Rle7
03-18-2006, 09:26 PM
WOW... I am really impressed. You put a lot of work into this, especially the crimemap. I also think a serial killer is loose in northern British Columbia and probably was acquainted with some of the victims. It's entirely plausible that he started killing in his teens back in the 1970's and is still out there killing people. The crimemap puts things in a better perspective. Thanks for all your hard work!

altruist1000
03-19-2006, 12:26 AM
You are very talented. Your use of the technology is inspiring in addition to the written content. I actually went to your site earlier today but there were no additional articles beyond "No answers here" & I was disappointed but now I see that you indeed have continued writing & I just didn't know how to access your more recent writings. Thank you for providing the link, now I have added to my favorites & can read. You are both thought provoking & informative, what a jewel.

shadowraiths
03-19-2006, 12:12 PM
Thanks. http://www.websleuths.com/forums/images/smilies/blushing.gif

I have always loved to write, am a bit of a geek, and have been interested in criminal psychology for...well...ages. I'm also a huge fan of deductive profiling and patterns, which is where crimemaps can come in handy. That is, in the context of serial crimes.

shadowraiths
03-21-2006, 12:58 AM
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20060316.BCBRIEFS16-2/TPStory/National

"Prince George -- The minister responsible for public safety in B.C. says he will attend the March 30-31 Highway of Tears symposium in Prince George."

Rle7
03-21-2006, 01:58 PM
If you have feedback, comments, suggestions, (especially) corrections and/or additional information please do not hesitate to respond to the comments section of the article (or here).
Here are some other missing/murdered people along Highway 16 I have noticed in various articles:


V. Hill’s mother (http://www.sistersinspirit.ca/TakeBacktheHighway_CommunitySummaries_Sept2005.doc ), missing since the 1970’s.


The entire Jack family, missing since 8/2/89 from the Bednesti Lake and Cluculz Lake area south of Highway 16. The only case of a family disappearance in Canada.




Doreen Jack (http://www.doenetwork.us/cases/1480dfbc.html)
Ronald Jack (http://www.doenetwork.us/cases/1376dmbc.html)
Russell Jack (http://www.doenetwork.us/cases/1377dmbc.html), 9
Ryan Jack (http://www.doenetwork.us/cases/1378dmbc.html), 4



Cecilia Anne Nikal (http://www.highwayoftears.ca/Missing%20Index/cecilia-anne-nikal.htm), missing since 1989.



Wendy Ratte (http://www.nampn.doenetwork.us/cases/ratte_wendy.html), 44, missing since 8/18/97



Deena Braem (http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/story.html?id=509d57bc-c4fb-408e-a117-b489499ce725&k=55114) (and here (http://www.pgcrimestoppers.bc.ca/details.php3?crimeID=152)), 16, missing 9/25/99. Her body was found murdered on 12/10/99.



Amanda Gore (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NatNews-north/message/6735) (and here (http://quesnelherald.modblog.com/?show=blogview&blog_id=532341)), 20, her body was found unconscious in Quesnal on 4/19/05. She died later in the hospital. An autopsy revealed she died from alcohol poisoning and exposure but her death remains suspicious.



Brianna Kaye Frederick (http://www.pgfreepress.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=26&cat=23&id=608629&more), 14, missing since 3/10/06

PonderingThings
03-21-2006, 02:13 PM
Shadowraiths I had a problem at your site. For some reason the background obscured the article - I couldn't read the type. What I ended up doing was copying it and pasting it in wordpad to read.

Although my computer sometimes has issues with things such as video, I've never had this problem before... thought you would want to know.

Good article though http://www.websleuths.com/forums/images/smilies/redface.gif

shadowraiths
03-21-2006, 02:46 PM
Here are some other missing/murdered people along Highway 16 I have noticed in various articles:



V. Hill’s mother (http://www.sistersinspirit.ca/TakeBacktheHighway_CommunitySummaries_Sept2005.doc ), missing since the 1970’s.


The entire Jack family, missing since 8/2/89 from the Bednesti Lake and Cluculz Lake area south of Highway 16. The only case of a family disappearance in Canada.




Doreen Jack (http://www.doenetwork.us/cases/1480dfbc.html)
Ronald Jack (http://www.doenetwork.us/cases/1376dmbc.html)
Russell Jack (http://www.doenetwork.us/cases/1377dmbc.html), 9
Ryan Jack (http://www.doenetwork.us/cases/1378dmbc.html), 4



Cecilia Anne Nikal (http://www.highwayoftears.ca/Missing%20Index/cecilia-anne-nikal.htm), missing since 1989.



Wendy Ratte (http://www.nampn.doenetwork.us/cases/ratte_wendy.html), 44, missing since 8/18/97



Deena Braem (http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/story.html?id=509d57bc-c4fb-408e-a117-b489499ce725&k=55114) (and here (http://www.pgcrimestoppers.bc.ca/details.php3?crimeID=152)), 16, missing 9/25/99. Her body was found murdered on 12/10/99.



Amanda Gore (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NatNews-north/message/6735) (and here (http://quesnelherald.modblog.com/?show=blogview&blog_id=532341)), 20, her body was found unconscious in Quesnal on 4/19/05. She died later in the hospital. An autopsy revealed she died from alcohol poisoning and exposure but her death remains suspicious.



Brianna Kaye Frederick (http://www.pgfreepress.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=26&cat=23&id=608629&more), 14, missing since 3/10/06


Thanks! I did find Cecilia Anne Nikal later and added her to both the article and the crime map. Will add the others as soon as I have some free time.

shadowraiths
03-21-2006, 02:59 PM
Shadowraiths I had a problem at your site. For some reason the background obscured the article - I couldn't read the type. What I ended up doing was copying it and pasting it in wordpad to read.

Although my computer sometimes has issues with things such as video, I've never had this problem before... thought you would want to know.

Good article though http://www.websleuths.com/forums/images/smilies/redface.gifIt may be a javascript problem (I use quite a bit of that). Might also be a browser problem. If it's the latter, I only support IE6 & Firefox, since ensuring all of my personal sites are xbrowser compatible would be far too time consuming.

One thing you could do is to consider using a feed reader. Don't know what OS you have, but if you have MS Windows, check out SharpReader (http://www.sharpreader.com/).

There are also some web-based readers (links for subscribing to those are on left hand side of my site near the bottom). So, say you have a yahoo or gmail account, you can add the rss feed by clicking on the applicable link and then read posts (without all of the graphics, etc) via those.

Hope this helps!

Rle7
03-22-2006, 01:47 PM
THE JOURNEY to raise awareness about the missing and murdered women along Hwy16 continues to move eastward today with several women due in Smithers from Moricetown.

The quest continues tomorrow when Matilda Wilson, mother of the late Ramona Wilson, 16, whose remains were found near the Smithers airport in April 1995, 10 months after she went missing while hitchhiking to a friend's home in Smithers, will join the Gitxsan Spirit walkers to continue to Prince George.

The walk to honour the Hwy16 families and victims began when Florence Naziel of Moricetown left Prince Rupert March 11 with several people, including Tom and Christine Chipman, the father and stepmother of missing Terrace woman Tamara Chipman.

Naziel and the group arrived at the Kermode Friendship Society here March 17.

"The walk went well," said Naziel. "We ran into wind and we ran into snow but nobody wanted to give up. It was very emotional at times."

There were tears in Naziels's eyes as she described walking past the spot where Alberta Williams' body was found Sept. 25, 1989, about 37 km east of Prince Rupert near the Tyee Overpass.

http://www.terracestandard.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=33&cat=23&id=611819&more=

shadowraiths
03-23-2006, 05:06 AM
Girl missing in Prince George
http://snipurl.com/nysm
Mar 17 2006

Frederick is the second 14-year-old aboriginal girl to go missing in Prince George this year.

[...]

Saric-Auger's body was found near the Tabor Mountain turnoff on Highway 16 East near Prince George, Feb. 10.

[...]

Anyone who has seen Frederick, or knows of her whereabouts, is asked to contact Prince George RCMP at 250-561-3300.

Rle7
03-23-2006, 10:54 AM
Girl missing in Prince George
http://snipurl.com/nysm
Mar 17 2006
Brianna Frederick was located safely four days after she disappeared thankfully. It took a while for that news to come up on Google.

http://72.14.203.104/search?q=cache:uQqIwVBycRUJ:www.94xfm.com/news.php+brianna+frederick&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=3

Rle7
03-23-2006, 01:12 PM
NEWSPAPER ADS asking for information about the missing women along Hwy16 have turned up tips for a private investigator who's on the case.

"I've had quite a number of tips and several leads I'm following up on," says Ray Michalko, a private investigator from Surrey, who placed an ad recently in The Terrace Standard.

Michalko wasn't sure how many tips he'd received and said he wants to follow up on the leads to see if they're valid before contacting the authorities.
He hopes the information he's received will yield something useful to the authorities and the missing women's families.

"I'm convinced someone knows something," says Michalko. Police have already devoted years and considerable resources in working on the cases.

http://www.terracestandard.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=33&cat=23&id=611823&more=

I hope a break in these cases develops.

Rle7
03-27-2006, 09:39 PM
Prince George RCMP are looking for a woman who may have information on the murder of Aielah-Saric -Auger.

Aielah's body was found off Highway 16 east near Tabor February 10th. She had been last seen alive around 10p.m.February 2 in the area of the First Litre Pub.

The woman police would like to talk to is described as being Caucasian, 30 years old, 5'5" medium build and has shoulder length straight blonde hair.

http://www.opinion250.com/blogs/news/archive/2006/03/27/8263.aspx

shadowraiths
03-28-2006, 06:31 PM
Thanks for all of the updates, Rle7! I've added your links, and am glad to hear Brianna Frederick was found and okay. I did add one other link, though it did not result in a missing person. However, it was an attempted abduction of a 14 year old female by a 50 year old male. (click here (http://www.pgcrimestoppers.bc.ca/details.php3?crimeID=172))

shadowraiths
03-30-2006, 03:36 AM
Conference to examine Highway of Tears (http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20060329/highway_tears_060329/20060329?hub=Canada)

"Officially, nine have gone missing or been killed on Highway 16 between Prince Rupert and Prince George since 1990.

But two other women also disappeared from the highway _ in 1974 and 1989, said RCMP Sgt. John Ward, who remained tight-lipped about any details of the ongoing investigations.

Aboriginal groups say the number is actually over 30.

Ward wouldn't discuss whether a serial killer may be at work in any of the cases, saying police do not believe the cases are linked.

The latest victim was 14-year-old Aielah Saric-Auger, whose lifeless body was found last month by a passing motorist, although police say her death may not be connected to the highway cases.

Among the missing or dead along the highway since 1990 are Saric-Auger, 14, Tamara Chipman, 22, Lana Derrick, 19, Ramona Wilson, 15, Delphine Nikal, 15, Roxanna Thiara, 15, Aleisha Germaine, 15, Nicole Hoar, 25. Only Hoar, who has been missing for four years, is non-native.

Monica Ignas was 15 when she disappeared from the highway in December 1974 and 27-year-old Alberta Williams vanished on Aug. 27, 1989."

shadowraiths
04-02-2006, 01:06 PM
Solve the mystery of the highway of tears (http://www.wltribune.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=37&cat=48&id=618786&more=)

"We're going to get a look at some of what's in those files at a symposium the end of March in Prince George. It's being organized by the Lheidli T'enneh Nation in response to the death of 14-year-old Aielah Saric-Auger whose body was found east of Prince George in February. She's the latest in a string of disappearances, murders and deaths involving young woman dating back decades along Hwy16."
(http://snipurl.com/ok6g)

docwho3
04-02-2006, 01:50 PM
This almost sounds less like a single killer and more like culture of thought that its ok to treat certain people as throw aways to be used and thrown away and that a certain area along a certan road is the traditional and acceptable dumping ground, sort of like out in some rural areas that people come to know is where you go to dump trash that you don't want anymore.

Rle7
04-05-2006, 02:04 PM
The RCMP is launching a special investigation into the women missing and murdered along Highway 16.

RCMP Superintendent Leon Van De Walle announced the investigation at the Highway of Tears Symposium at CN Centre, March 30-31. Van De Walle is a veteran investigator and heads up ‘E’ Division major crimes unit.
“We have eight skilled investigators and this will be their only focus, their only job,” Van De Walle said. “In different phases we’ll bring in specialists in different areas.”

The review will be based in Vancouver, although officers will continue to investigate along the Highway 16 corridor, Van De Walle said.
All the information gathered on the cases will be compiled into a database, allowing officers to compare cases easily. Modern forensic science will be applied to the older cases in hopes of finding new leads.
“Science has come a very long way in crime investigation,” Van De Walle said. “But it’s still half science, half art form.”

The “art form” side of investigations still relies heavily on the investigators’ skill and intuition, he explained.

‘E’ Division’s unsolved homicide unit, the first in Canada, is a leader in solving “cold cases,” Van De Walle said.

“I’ve worked with Scotland Yard, I’ve worked with the FBI and I’ve worked with the New York State Police and the RCMP are as good as any of them – better in some ways,” Van De Walle said. “We are some of the best at cold case investigations.”

RCMP investigators will be putting on four lectures for the FBI on their cold case techniques, he added.

“These crimes are never closed. A new team of investigators may look into it with new eyes,” Van De Walle said. “I can tell you that any of the RCMP in this room take this very seriously. I’ve investigated many, many homicides. I can’t remember all the ones I’ve solved, but the ones you can’t solve stick with you.”

http://www.pgfreepress.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=26&cat=23&id=621929&more=

shadowraiths
04-11-2006, 07:30 PM
The RCMP is ramping up its investigation partly as a result of pressure from aboriginal women in British Columbia.

The Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs sponsored the two-day Highway of Tears Symposium in Prince George this week to raise awareness of the problems along the highway. The attendees included senior RCMP officers, the province's solicitor general, social workers, First Nations leaders and the families of missing women.

The Highway of Tears is an 800-kilometre stretch of Highway 16 between Prince George and Prince Rupert. Nine young women, including eight aboriginal females aged 14 to 22, have gone missing on the highway since 1990.

Aboriginal leaders said up to 50 aboriginals have disappeared on the highway in recent decades.

Some of the missing have been found dead by the side of the highway. Others are still missing.

Full article: http://www.cbc.ca/story/canada/national/2006/04/01/tears-060401.html

Rle7
06-07-2006, 10:32 PM
TIPSTERS who have possible leads about the missing women along Hwy16 are critical of how police handle their information.

"Some feel that they are not getting the correct response," said Surrey private investigator Ray Michalko, who was here recently to follow up on leads he received after advertising for information.

One woman, said Michalko, found a tree planting shovel leaning against a tree while hiking in a heavily wooded area between Hwy16 and the Skeena River. She returned home to call police immediately as she believed the shovel could've belonged to Nicole Hoar, the treeplanter who disappeared while hitchhiking just west of Prince George in 2002.

"Not only was she not allowed to personally talk to a police officer, but her call was dismissed outright, by the civilian employee that answered the telephone," Michalko said.

He determined the shovel didn't belong Hoar.

Michalko also said a man called police after seeing a vehicle similar to one described as being of interest in the case of one missing woman, only to be told by the civilian employee who answered the phone that the particular detachment he called was not handling the case and that he should call a long-distance number of another detachment to relay the information. The man called the number, left messages on the answering machine and still hasn't heard back from police four years later, the investigator continued.

"There's more examples like that," Michalko said, adding that these two people seemed to be "normal, honest people."

http://www.terracestandard.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=33&cat=23&id=662576&more=

Rle7
06-12-2006, 05:46 PM
Meanwhile, Mattie Wilson, the mother of Ramona Wilson who disappeared near Smithers on July 10, 2004 and whose remains were found on April 10, 1995, said relations with the RCMP have vastly improved since the Highway of Tears Symposium at the end of March in Prince George.

“They’re working closely with us, which I’ve wanted to see for a long time,” she said.

That new partnership will be continued at a followup meeting between the families of the missing and slain women and RCMP on June 15 in Prince George at the Ramada Inn.

“Some families have expressed dissatisfaction with the Prince George location, because they feel that the majority of the women have gone missing from areas west of Smithers and the meeting should be held in a more central location, related to the actual locations of the disappearances,” Michalko said.

But Wilson is just relieved to have the channels of communication opened up.

“I feel it’s ok with me,” she said.

“I don’t know about those who have a hard time traveling.”

To alleviate some of that burden, the government is picking up the traveling expenses for the families.

At the March symposium, Dahl Chambers, Prince George RCMP superintendent, promised action but said the police need help.

“Our hope is the symposium will draw attention to these tragedies,” he said.

“It’s through public participation that these [cases] are solved, not some magic bullet in the sky.”

Both Michalko and the RCMP continue to urge people to come forward with any information no matter how trivial it may seem. For those that have a problem going to the police, Michalko promised 100 per cent confidentiality.

“The whole premise here is that people can be guaranteed that they can talk to me in confidence,” he said.

Holland doesn’t much care how the tips come in as long as they do. “There’s information on these crimes out in the public,” he said. “One way or another we need to get that information.”

http://www.interior-news.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=31&cat=23&id=663092&more=

Rle7
06-23-2006, 09:21 PM
The Highway of Tears Symposium Recommendations Report contains 33 recommendations to prevent additional women and girls from disappearing along Highway 16, called “The Highway of Tears.”

The report is dedicated to Aielah Saric-Auger, Tamara Chipman, Nicole Hoar, Lana Derrick, Alisha Germaine, Roxanne Thiara, Ramona Wilson, Delphine Nikal and Cicilia Anne Nikal who all were murdered or went missing along the highway between 1989 and 2006.

However the report estimates as many as 30 women may have been murdered or gone missing over the last 35 years.

The report identifies a victim profile and makes recommendations in the areas of victim prevention, emergency planning and team readiness, victim counseling and support, and community development and support.

The victims were young women or girls aged 14 to 25, with the large majority being aboriginal.

The majority of the victims disappeared while hitchhiking along Highway 16 between spring and fall.

Poverty and the remoteness of small aboriginal communities are considered contributing factors to the number of aboriginal women hitchhiking along the highway.

One of the key recommendations in victim prevention is the creation of a shuttle bus service along the 742 km highway to offer young women an alternative to hitchhiking. Other than the Greyhound Bus Line which runs twice daily, there is no public transportation available along the highway.
In addition, RCMP detachments should be given extra resources to patrol the highway and stop to talk with any hitchhiker meeting the victim profile. Victims should be encouraged to take some other form of transportation.

http://www.pgfreepress.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=26&cat=23&id=675294&more=

Rle7
06-23-2006, 09:24 PM
Symposium Recommendations (http://www.highwayoftears.ca/)

Rle7
07-03-2006, 01:28 AM
http://www.highwayoftears.piczo.com/?cr=1&rfm=y

Rle7
09-08-2006, 12:21 PM
Every spring when the snow melts, Sally Gibson organizes a search team to look for her niece, Lana Derrick, who went missing in October 1995. "It's a ritual," she says. Once the weather warms up, Gibson gathers her friends and encourages them to walk the desolate roads behind her house.

She's not alone. Families all along Canada's Highway 16 -- a 425-mile stretch of road that cuts through pine forests, rivers and remote Indigenous reserves in central British Columbia -- are searching for their missing loved ones. There was Delphine Nikals who went missing in 1990; Ramona Wilson who disappeared in 1994; and last year, Tamara Chipman disappeared.

The families have dubbed the road the "Highway of Tears," and Amnesty International estimates that 32 aboriginal Canadian women have gone missing in the last three decades along the highway, which runs from Prince Rupert to Prince George.

Highway Of Tears Documentary (http://www.pbs.org/frontlineworld/blog/2006/08/canada_highway.html)

Rle7
09-16-2006, 05:42 PM
Many years before it was called the highway of tears, before there were symposiums, before there was media attention and concerned politicians, there was a six-month-old baby without a mother.

The baby, now 29-year-old Vicki Hill, grew up knowing that her mother was killed on Highway 16 and the killer was never found.

In 2004, with the help of RCMP victim-support services, Ms. Hill was able to obtain the coroner's report about her mother's death.

She also found an article at the public library in the Prince Rupert Daily News from 1978 that detailed what little the police knew and all Ms. Hill knows today.

The body of 31-year-old Mary Jane Hill of Kincolith, B.C., was found on Highway 16, 30 kilometres east of Prince Rupert.

Ms. Hill grew up with her father's side of the family, who never talked about her mother's death. It wasn't until several years ago when she attended a wedding that she saw what her mother looked like.

"I was given a small black-and-white photograph of her by my mom's sister," she said. "Everyone says I look like her."

Her mother's unsolved killing is an example of a number of incidents that predate the public attention to the highway of tears.

Ms. Hill believes these need to be investigated because they could provide a link with the crimes of the past decade and a half where an inexperienced killer may have made a mistake.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20060916.BCHIGHWAY16/TPStory/National

Rle7
09-16-2006, 05:52 PM
The 2nd annual Take Back The Highway march gets underway today (9/16/2006) in Prince George, and as a result of participant feedback, the event has undergone some changes this year, says coordinator Sarah Boyd-Noel.

One of the most important changes is that men are welcome to participate in this year’s march, says Boyd-Noel. The march wished to be inclusive, and it was recognized that male family members would wish to take part as well.

The goal of the march is to raise awareness about violence against women, especially Aboriginal women, and to honour the memory of the women and girls who have been murdered or gone missing along Highway 16 between Prince George and Prince Rupert. The stretch of highway has become known as the Highway of Tears, and reports suggest up to 30 women and girls have gone missing or been murdered along it since 1974.

http://www.opinion250.com/blog/view/3541/3/time+to+take+back+the+highway

Rle7
10-05-2006, 12:16 PM
A private investigator looking into the cases of murdered and missing women along Hwy 16 is bristling at the suggestion he is not cooperating with police.

Staff Sgt. John Ward, an RCMP communications officer, said Ray Michalko has been warned not to reveal information and to share any leads he picks up.

“We have been in contact with the private investigator and he understands very clearly that should he have information that someone comes forward with... he should be giving us a call and we expect that to happen should he uncover something,” said Ward.

Michalko, who has been collecting leads along the highway, now dubbed the Highway of Tears, plans to come to Smithers this month to talk with tipsters and five people of interest who he believes may be able to lead him toward the solution to the decades-old mystery of who has been abducting and murdering women along the highway between Prince George and Prince Rupert. “If this gentleman, Mr. Michalko, says he’s got five people of interest then we certainly want to know who they are and we’ll take it from there,” Ward said.

http://www.interior-news.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=31&cat=23&id=741641&more=

Rle7
12-04-2006, 12:52 PM
When one Prince George woman looks back on her life, she realizes how lucky she is to still be around to share her experiences.

Jacqui Ketlo, a petite Native woman who stands less than five feet tall, did a fair amount of hitchhiking when she was young and sometimes found herself in high-risk situations.

Now after anguishing over the losses of female hitchhikers along Highway 16 West, the so-called Highway of Tears, the 47-year-old has come forward to share her stories as a way to warn others about the dangers of hitchhiking.

http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/news/current/n_empty.php?sid=1348417

blaize
12-04-2006, 02:21 PM
This almost sounds less like a single killer and more like culture of thought that its ok to treat certain people as throw aways to be used and thrown away and that a certain area along a certan road is the traditional and acceptable dumping ground, sort of like out in some rural areas that people come to know is where you go to dump trash that you don't want anymore.Uuughh the whole Highway of Tears thing is like something out of a horror movie. It seems though that a culture of disposable people could have existed that allowed a serial killer or killers to operate with impunity.

I think it's interesting that more victims are being found as time goes on & would be very interested to know if any other stretch of highway has as horrible a reputation as this one deservedly has?

blaize

Rle7
12-04-2006, 08:11 PM
Uuughh the whole Highway of Tears thing is like something out of a horror movie. It seems though that a culture of disposable people could have existed that allowed a serial killer or killers to operate with impunity.

I think it's interesting that more victims are being found as time goes on & would be very interested to know if any other stretch of highway has as horrible a reputation as this one deservedly has?

blaize
The Trans-Canada highway running through the provinces of Alberta and British Columbia had a similar series of killings in the 1970's and early 1980's. The killer(s) in these cases didn't seem to care about the victim's race. These murders remain unsolved:

http://www.crimezzz.net/serialkillers/C/CANADA_HIGHWAY_murders.php

blaize
12-04-2006, 08:41 PM
The Trans-Canada highway running through the provinces of Alberta and British Columbia had a similar series of killings in the 1970's and early 1980's. The killer(s) in these cases didn't seem to care about the victim's race. These murders remain unsolved:

http://www.crimezzz.net/serialkillers/C/CANADA_HIGHWAY_murders.php
Such a grim tale. Perhaps a dreadful truth is echoed in the last paragraph of the entry at your link. (Source (http://www.crimezzz.net/serialkillers/C/CANADA_HIGHWAY_murders.php))

A ray of hope broke through in 1983, with the marathon confessions of serial slayers Henry Lucas and Ottis Toole including references to "several" Canadian victims, but no charges have been filed to date, and the slayings remain unsolved.

We can only hope that the Highway Of Tears killings won't be swallowed into the same limbo.

blaize

Rle7
12-04-2006, 10:07 PM
Such a grim tale. Perhaps a dreadful truth is echoed in the last paragraph of the entry at your link. (Source (http://www.crimezzz.net/serialkillers/C/CANADA_HIGHWAY_murders.php))

A ray of hope broke through in 1983, with the marathon confessions of serial slayers Henry Lucas and Ottis Toole including references to "several" Canadian victims, but no charges have been filed to date, and the slayings remain unsolved.

We can only hope that the Highway Of Tears killings won't be swallowed into the same limbo.

blaizeSerial killer Clifford Olson was also a suspect for the Highway Murders. It's interesting to note that after Olson was incarcerated for good in 1981, the Highway Murders stopped:



In less than nine months Olson killed 11 times. There were also four other suspected murder victims for which he was not tried: Verna Bjerky, 17, was reported missing from Hope/Yale area and not located as of 7-30-81; Pamela Darlington, Kamloops, B.C.; Monica Jack, Quilchena, B.C.; Marney Jamieson, Gibsons, B.C.

http://www.crimelibrary.com/serial_killers/predators/olson/19.html

It's certainly possible that another psychopath/sexual predator like Olson is active on the Highway of Tears.

Rle7
12-24-2006, 11:07 AM
Many people have talked about the missing and murdered women along Highway 16, the so-called Highway of Tears. But Prince George musician and song writer Ray Bessette was moved to sing about it. Bessette has been playing music and writing songs for many years. The stories about the missing women and the Highway of Tears gave him inspiration to write about them.

Three years ago, Bessette was reading the morning newspaper and saw a picture of Nicole Hoar, a tree planter who disappeared one summer while on her way back to work. He was so moved by the story that he wrote a song “Please Come Home” to express his feelings for the victims. Later Bessett and his friend Brent Brekkaas co-wrote a song titled “Highway of Tears” in response to Tamara Chipman’s disappearance. They partnered with Tony Romeyn, the founder of The Highway of Tears website, and together they started working on projects to create public awareness and education. Since Bessette’s passion is music, he wanted to use music as the channel for awareness.

http://www.pgfreepress.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=26&cat=46&id=798365&more=

Rle7
01-10-2007, 01:17 PM
RCMP say they will conduct an investigation to see where Thomas Svekla, of Ft Saskatchewan was when a number of women disappeared along the Highway 16 corridor in this province.

Svekla is charged in the deaths of two prostitutes in the Edmonton Alberta area.

Svekla was originally charged with murder in connection with the death of 36 year old Teresa Ennes whose body was found stuffed in a hockey bag at a residence occupied by Svekla.

He has now been charged with murder in connection with the death of street worker Rachel Quinney, 19 whose body was discovered by Svekla, who informed police.

Both women were from the Edmonton area and police say, as a matter of routine, they now will piece together where Svekla was during the time that a number of women disappeared from cities and towns along Highway 16 , which now has been dubbed the "Highway of Tears".

http://www.opinion250.com/blog/view...s+investigators (http://www.opinion250.com/blog/view/4551/3/alberta+man++in+custody+to+be+looked+at+by+highway +of+tears+investigators)

Lurker Steve
01-10-2007, 09:51 PM
I wonder if this could be someone from one of the First Nations. They wouldn't look out of place in the areas where these women are from. Someone who was white would have stood out like a sore thumb.

Rle7
02-02-2007, 01:42 PM
14-year-old Aielah Saric-Auger, a student at DP Todd Secondary, was last seen on the evening of February 2, 2006. Her body was found eight days later on the side of Highway 16-East, near of Tabor Mountain.

Prince George RCMP Constable Gary Godwin says there is nothing new to report in the investigation on this day. Godwin says he’s had no update from plain clothes officers investigating the young teen’s murder.

It was the disappearance and death of Saric-Auger that galvanized people and communities along Highway 16-West to come together and try to do something, in light of the many women who’ve gone missing along that stretch of road over the past decade.

http://www.opinion250.com/blog/view/4812/3/today+marks+one+year+since+teen's+disappearance

Rle7
02-10-2007, 01:27 PM
It has been just over a year since Aielah Saric-Auger was last seen alive by her family.

After eight days of frantic searching, her body was discovered Feb. 10, 2006 on the side of Highway 16 near Tabor Mountain. She was 14 years old.

Very few details of the subsequent investigation have been made public, but Prince George RCMP stress the search for the killer is on in earnest.

"The Prince George detachment serious crime unit with support from North District general investigation section and the (E-Division) major crime unit will continue to investigate all leads in relation to the murder of Aielah Saric-Auger," said Sgt. Paul Strader, one of the lead investigators.

One of the only details to publicly emerge was the need for the police to speak with an unknown woman that came to their attention. With little more than some public information and an artist's sketch that ran in the media, that woman was found. Although she was ruled out as having any association to the case, Prince George RCMP spokesman Const. Gary Godwin hopes the public sees that as a sign from the police that behind the scenes, they are working the leads with vigour.

"There is always a lot of forensic evidence, and there is the media side of it where we ask the public to call in any information they may have," Godwin said. "Running down the leads we get always means a lot of legwork as you bring those tips, no matter how small, to their logical conclusion. And there is also a lot of forensics work."

http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/news/current/n_empty.php?sid=1401901

Rle7
02-22-2007, 09:45 PM
British Columbia's so-called Highway of Tears may soon have 10 billboards along its stretch warning female hitchhikers not to retrace the steps of the women who've gone missing there.

Prince George Mayor Colin Kinsley said his council approved the billboards Monday night and the regional district will consider the issue Friday night.

"It's a compelling image and if it stops hitchhiking, that's one important goal, although we also need to look at car-pooling and other options," said Kinsley.

Joanne Monaghan, who has championed the project, says the goal of the billboards, slated to go up along the 724-kilometre stretch of highway from Prince Rupert to Prince George is to prevent hitchhiking and provide a stark reminder of what happened to the missing and dead women found there.

The billboard, based on a painting by artist Tom McHarg, is of a young woman "thumb in the air" surrounded by a fading row of crosses, with the snow, rain or tears falling and the ghosts of those who have gone before, trying to restrain her from getting in the car.

http://www.canada.com/topics/news/national/story.html?id=f7bcd93a-cf3d-4c59-9ec3-716e2e2607a1&k=85645

KarlK
02-25-2007, 02:47 PM
The Trans-Canada highway running through the provinces of Alberta and British Columbia had a similar series of killings in the 1970's and early 1980's. The killer(s) in these cases didn't seem to care about the victim's race. These murders remain unsolved:

http://www.crimezzz.net/serialkillers/C/CANADA_HIGHWAY_murders.phpI've always wondered why that area (Oregon/Washington state/British Columbia) had so many serial killing episodes involving sex-related murders. Considering population density it has to be by far the most dangerous area in North America for women to hitchhike or live off prostitution.

Rle7
02-25-2007, 08:01 PM
I've always wondered why that area (Oregon/Washington state/British Columbia) had so many serial killing episodes involving sex-related murders. Considering population density it has to be by far the most dangerous area in North America for women to hitchhike or live off prostitution.
I think it has a lot to do with a patrolling a large expanse of land with sparse population in the case of northern British Columbia. A small tax base limits how many detectives you can put on a case. For the Green River murders, the state legislature decided lives weren't worth the money and pulled funding from the task force in Washington, allowing the killer to continuing his spree. I've worked with Fish and Wildlife Protection in Alaska, and that can be challenging. I've been over a thousand miles away from the home base. There's not enough money to patrol that large an expanse properly. I assume its the same for northern British Columbia.

KarlK
02-25-2007, 08:55 PM
I think it has a lot to do with a patrolling a large expanse of land with sparse population in the case of northern British Columbia. A small tax base limits how many detectives you can put on a case. For the Green River murders, the state legislature decided lives weren't worth the money and pulled funding from the task force in Washington, allowing the killer to continuing his spree. I've worked with Fish and Wildlife Protection in Alaska, and that can be challenging. I've been over a thousand miles away from the home base. There's not enough money to patrol that large an expanse properly. I assume its the same for northern British Columbia.Yes, I imagine that the situation is similar in Alaska and northern British Columbia. But most serial killings have occured in the relatively small and relatively densily populated area comprising the cities of Seattle and Vancouver (Canada) and while some victims there were Native women they did not appear to have been specifically targeted on a race basis.

In fact unlike the Highway of Tears case(s) where racial bias may have played a role, the vast majority of victims in southern BC/northern Washington were white women and as far as I know all the serial killers caught there were white men, including the man who's presently on trial in Vancouver for an impressive series of sex-murders (I think Seattle PD would also like to have a word with him concerning unsolved cases there).

I'm wondering if there wouldn't be some sociological factor specific to the area that could help to explain the phenomenon but I don't really have the knowledge required to pursue this to any depth.

Rle7
02-27-2007, 03:57 PM
The top cop in the Highway of Tears cases is coming to northern B.C. Friday to

meet with the families of the many missing and murdered women.

RCMP Supt. Leon Van De Walle will also talk with the governing body working to implement the recommendations of the Highway of Tears report.

Van De Walle, who is in charge of the E-Division major crime section and the lead investigator in the Highway of Tears disappearances and murders, will be in Smithers on Friday, according to meeting organizers.

"I find it hopeful," said Lucy Glaim, whose sister Delphine Nikal and cousin Cecilia Nikal are both among the missing. She said she has some blunt questions for Van De Walle.

"My sister's case in particular has been put on hold due to budget constraints," Glaim said. "I'm hoping to get some answers about that excuse. I was told that two years ago by one of the investigators, and there have been so many of them. I've been told they even think they know where her body is, but they can't afford the backhoe, so it has been put on hold. I definitely want to discuss that with Mr. Van De Walle."

http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/news/current/n_empty.php?sid=1416367

Rle7
03-09-2007, 02:50 PM
Psychic Norm Pratt is probing the disappearance of a Red Deer woman on B.C.'s infamous Highway of Tears.

But if he has any ideas on the whereabouts of Nicole Hoar, he's not sharing them publicly - not yet, anyway.

Pratt, who likes to refer to himself as a "spiritual intuitive," says he's leery about going public for several reasons, including the fact that the RCMP are still investigating.

The 47-year-old Pratt, who in 2005 helped police recover a woman's remains near his hometown of Nelson, B.C., will only speak in general terms about the stretch of highway that has become a Bermuda Triangle for hitchhikers. "In the Highway of Tears, there are far more missing people than is reported or that are officially recognized," he told the Sun yesterday, adding he has visited the Highway of Tears twice.

"There is a serial killer, but some (victims) were killed by people they knew."

http://www.edmontonsun.com/News/Canada/2007/03/09/3719687-sun.html

Rle7
03-28-2007, 01:54 PM
Plans are underway for a second Highway of Tears Symposium, The Citizen has learned.

This week marks the one year anniversary of the first Highway of Tears Symposium that opened unprecedented dialogue on the issue of the young women murdered and missing along Highway 16 West. The first symposium brought together families of the many victims, the highest level of RCMP in the province, several provincial cabinet ministers, hundreds of advocates and social workers from across the north, and many others who wanted to learn from the passionate discussion that ensued.

One of the results of the first symposium was the Highway of Tears Report, a document that lists a number of recommendations compiled during the symposium. They are designed to advance the investigations into the unsolved cases of murder and disappearance, to prevent more victims, and to tunnel through the mountains of cultural impasse between aboriginal and mainstream communities in Northern B.C.

"A second symposium is really important. It is a long stretch of highway and keeping everyone involved is difficult," said Lisa Krebs, the Highway of Tears Initiative co-ordinator hired to foster the implementation of the recommendations. "The community forums that are happening, that is great, and just having the Highway of Tears Report is great, but what happens after it? There needs to be a way to keep advancing, and a second symposium is the way to bring everyone together again to talk about their parts and what the commitments are for the next year."

http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/news/current/n_empty.php?sid=1396554

Rle7
03-29-2007, 09:34 PM
RCMP say the two men recently arrested and charged with the murder of a 14 year old Abbotsford girl, are not, being investigated in connection with any of the deaths or disappearances along the so called Highway of Tears.

“We don’t have any information that would lead us to believe there is any connection” says Corporal Dale Carr, “However, if someone came forward, we would pursue that avenue”.

Police continue to investigate the disappearances and deaths of eleven young women along Highway 16 between Prince George and Prince Rupert.

54 year old Jessie Blue West, currently of Victoria, and his 22 year old son Dustin Moir of the Lower Mainland ( in the photos at left) are charged in connection with the death of 14 year old Chelsey Acorn. Her remains were discovered near Hope in April of 2006. She had been reported missing from an Abbotsford foster home in June of 2005.

http://www.opinion250.com/blog/view/5339/3/two++not++linked++to+highway+of+tears

Rle7
04-15-2007, 02:50 PM
Surrey private investigator Ray Michalko returned today to Northwest B.C. to follow up on more tips into the missing and murdered women along Hwy 16, dubbed the Highway of Tears.

In particular, he is looking more closely at the cases of Ramona Wilson and Nicole Hoar.

Wilson disappeared in June 1994 and her body was discovered near Smithers in April 1995. Hoar was last seen hitchhiking on Hwy 16 near Gauthier Road in Prince George just a few blocks from where Alisha Germaine’s body was found in 1994.

In September, thinking the connection between Hoar and Germaine was significant, Michalko circulated flyers in that P.G. neighbourhood. Resulting tips have led him to Fort St. John.

http://www.pgfreepress.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=26&cat=23&id=961921&more=

Rle7
04-15-2007, 02:56 PM
IT HAS been one year since the Highway of Tears symposium in Prince George. We have shed many tears. We may shed more yet but we are not much nearer to a resolution. This is not to say that good things have not been done.

A movie has been made, awareness grows, police investigations widen and continue, stickers abound. They proclaim, “Hitchhiking: it ain’t worth the risk, sister.” Of all our attempts to resolve the issue, I think I have the greatest problem with the stickers.

Has no one noticed that the victims are young, mostly aboriginal and mainly poor?

Few people hitch for pleasure. They hitchhike because they are poor.

They need to travel from one place to another and they don’t have a car and can’t afford the bus. Telling them not to hitchhike is telling them they cannot travel, a message likely to fall on deaf ears.

In another part of the province, we are just beginning our long examination of Robert Pickton and the deaths of at least six women. The women were put in harm’s way by a social policy on welfare that completely ignored their desperate circumstances.

They did not choose to be poor. Prostitution was not their career of choice. Our welfare system keeps people so poor that many cannot dig themselves out of a hole that deep.

Some self-medicate with drugs or alcohol to mask the hopelessness of their situations. Their addiction digs the hole deeper. The prostitution they engage in to support their habit makes that hole deeper.

These women would be with us today if we had a system of social support that cared about each person’s welfare. They did not choose to be on the street. We put them there. What links death on a pig farm to death on a lonely highway? Poverty.

The mother of Ramona Wilson, one of the young women who disappeared, spoke on CBC Radio recently. Talking of her daughter, she said, “She wasn’t doing anything wrong when she disappeared.” And she wasn’t. She just needed a ride. Maybe the resolution is simple – give a person a ride.

The longer a person stands by the roadside, the greater the risk. Think of the number of good-hearted citizens that probably drive by a hitchhiker before one actually stops. Let’s increase that number. Let’s do it in memory of the young women who have disappeared from our lives. Let’s do it so that no more mothers grieve.

Let’s do it because most of us have daughters or sisters and would hope that someone would stop for them if they were on the road, someone safe. Be that safe person. Safe people, working together, create a safe community.

http://www.terracestandard.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=33&cat=48&id=870203&more=

Ranter
04-17-2007, 12:14 PM
Encouraging people to pick up hitch-hikers is the worst possible thing someone could do. The more "good hearted people" who pick up hitch-hikers, the more likely people are going to hitch-hike, and the more likely they are going to feel safe doing so. This will only increase the number of potential targets for a predatorial serial killer.

I remember travelling from Winnipeg to southern and central Alberta in 1980 as a ten-year-old with my parents. The Trans-Canada highway and Yellowhead Route were absolutely teeming with hitch-hikers. They would hold up signs saying "Calgary Please" or "Vancouver Please", etc... Not surprisingly, this was at the tail end of when the Canada Highway Murders were happening (1973 - 1981). It wasn't until the early 80's, when the term "serial killer" entered the public lexicon, that it finally became ingrained in people's minds that hitch-hiking was an inherently dangerous activity.

The last thing we need is a return to that naive time, when hitch-hiking was considered a normal mode of transportation for the young and penniless. It is simply too dangerous. It is not even safe for men -- for women, it is deadly. The woman who wrote the above article was no doubt well-meaning, but in my opinion, terribly misquided in her advice.

Rle7
05-11-2007, 11:17 AM
Private investigator Ray Michalko will be at the corner of Highway 16 West and Norman Lake Road Saturday at 9 a.m. A group of concerned citizens is expected to join him and search a wooded area in that vicinity for evidence in one of the Highway of Tears mysteries.

"As people arrive we will organize into groups and head out," Michalko said. "When we all get together we will talk about where we will search, how we will arrange ourselves, a closing point for the search, all of that."

Michalko will not say to which Highway of Tears victim this search pertains. He put out the call for volunteers based on tips he has received during his own private inquest into at least four of the Highway of Tears cases. Those tips led him to believe a search in this spot would be worthwhile.

"I've had lots of calls from different groups of people," Michalko said. "I could see 100 people showing up to help but I don't know if that will happen. I would be happy with 25 or 30."

http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=71769&Itemid=26

Rle7
05-13-2007, 01:27 PM
Private investigator Ray Michalko said the search of a wilderness area down the Norman Lake Road ended without the result he had hoped for.

Still, he told The Citizen, he has reason for optimism going forward.

"Information came to me even while we were out there on the search," he said. "There are people out there who know what happened, we just have to find those people. It is about knocking on the right door at the right time."

http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=72895&Itemid=239

Rle7
05-26-2007, 12:59 PM
With his thatch of silver hair and relaxed manner, Ray Michalko could be just another grandfather as he opens a folder and slides a pair of photographs across the table in a busy Tim Hortons, near the Guildford Mall, in Surrey.

But Mr. Michalko is not sharing pictures of a beloved grandchild, as might fit the scene where friends are meeting over coffee and Timbits on a weekday morning. Instead, under the stark heading "Murdered & Missing," he has offered a sheet of paper with head and shoulder shots of two young women he has never known. They both vanished in Prince George and their cases, in which he now has a burning interest, remain among the most troubling unsolved crimes in British Columbia's history.

"I've got three kids of my own and I just can't imagine losing any of them like this and just not knowing what happened," says the former RCMP officer, turned realtor, turned private investigator, who at age 59 has taken on a string of murders that has confounded police for decades.

Alisha Germaine, a 15-year-old with a pageboy haircut who was photographed looking coyly at the camera, was found murdered near an elementary school on Leslie Road in Prince George, in December, 1994. She was last seen alive on a sidewalk downtown.

Nicole Hoar, a vibrant young tree planter with an open and joyous smile that seems to radiate happiness, was last seen in June, 2002, on the outskirts of the city, just a short distance from Leslie Road, hitchhiking west on Highway 16.

Both of them are on a list of 12 names of young women who disappeared on, or whose bodies were found along Yellowhead Highway 16, the so-called Highway of Tears, that cuts for 724 kilometres across northern B.C. between Prince George and Prince Rupert. Seven of the missing women were never found. All are presumed dead.

Mr. Michalko put Ms. Germaine and Ms. Hoar on a poster together because they were last seen so close together. He had the flyer delivered to every house in the area.

"If you know anything at all ... please do the right thing. Call Ray," it says.

"I think it's somebody in that area, or somebody who visits that area," he says.

It's just one of the approaches he has taken. He's also had posters put up in every prison in B.C., figuring who better to know a killer than a criminal.

Asked if he's doing the investigation because he thinks the RCMP are falling down on the job, Mr. Michalko smiles and says he's not interested in bashing the police.

"But 12 murders? All of them unsolved? There's got to be something wrong with that picture," Mr. Michalko says. He acknowledges that it seems unlikely he can break a case that has stumped the RCMP, but he just keeps plugging away, persuaded that an old guy with a friendly manner and a firm handshake can learn things the police with all their formidable investigative powers cannot.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20070522.BCDETECTIVE22/TPStory/National/?pageRequested=1

Alta
07-01-2007, 04:49 PM
A B.C. woman has begun a healing walk along the so-called "highway of tears."
Audrey Auger plans to walk 800 kilometres from Prince Rupert to Prince George in memory of her daughter, who was murdered last year. Auger is the mother of Aielah Saric-Auger whose body was found near Prince George in February 2006, two weeks after she went missing from her home.

http://tinyurl.com/2fzbp3

Rle7
07-11-2007, 01:11 PM
A B.C. woman has begun a healing walk along the so-called "highway of tears."
Audrey Auger plans to walk 800 kilometres from Prince Rupert to Prince George in memory of her daughter, who was murdered last year. Auger is the mother of Aielah Saric-Auger whose body was found near Prince George in February 2006, two weeks after she went missing from her home.

http://tinyurl.com/2fzbp3

She had to discontinue her walk because of lack of support and it's the height of bear season:

Bears and a lack of support have stopped a grieving mother who is walking the Highway of Tears in a bid to find healing following the loss of her teenaged daughter last year.

Audrey Auger, mother of Aielah Saric-Auger, whose body was found 15 kilometres east of Prince George in February 2006 along Highway 16, has returned to Prince Rupert after several signs of bears, a lack of a proper support vehicle, food and supplies prevented her from continuing.

"We got to about one-half hour (by vehicle) west of Terrace where we found ourselves in real bear country between mountains and a river," said Auger, who began her walk July 1. "It's just too dangerous to take a chance on getting in between a mother and her cubs. We're not ready to wrestle bears, so safety comes first," said Auger, who was walking with 15-year-old Pierre Johns (Aielah's closest friend) and her 17-year-old daughter, Kyla.

Ironically, Auger said they had no choice but to hitchhike back to Prince Rupert, where they are staying at the Salvation Army. At least seven women have disappeared along the highway between Prince Rupert and Prince George, most while hitchhiking.

http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=94876&Itemid=254

Rle7
07-28-2007, 02:37 PM
The mother and sister of Aielah Saric-Auger – the 14-year-old Prince George girl whose body was found on Highway 16 near the Tabor Mountain turnoff east of Prince George in February 2006 – are embarking on a 760 km spiritual healing walk from Prince George to Gift Lake Metis Settlement in Alberta where Saric-Auger’s body is interred.

Audrey Auger and her daughter Kyla will begin their trek on Aug. 1 and plan to finish by the end of September or mid-October.

“When I buried my daughter, I buried myself... I need to find myself and this is where I shall start my journey,” Auger wrote in a press release.

“Now I find myself facing the most difficult time in admitting that my little girl is really gone, and I must start healing somewhere. So that’s why I have chosen the highway as my healing journey in life.”

Saric-Auger was the latest young woman to disappear or be murdered along Highway 16 – dubbed the Highway of Tears.

“It’s an honour to walk in dedication and remembrance of our missing and lost young women and therefore this healing walk is not only to find myself, but also to give awareness to the communities along the highways and nation wide.”

The pair’s route will take them along Highway 97 to Dawson Creek, B.C., then on Highway 49 to High Prairie, Alta. before following Highway 2 and Highway 750 to Gift Lake. They will be camping on the side of the road as they walk.

http://www.pgfreepress.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=26&cat=23&id=1033765&more=0

Rle7
08-22-2007, 09:53 PM
Audrey Auger and her daughter, Kyla, started their 760 km healing walk from east of Prince George to the Gift Lake Metis Settlement in Alberta last week.

Their walk began Wednesday on Highway 16 East near the Tabor Mountain turn off where 14-year-old Aielah Saric-Auger’s body was found in February 2006. Saric-Auger was Auger’s daughter and Kyla’s sister, and is the most recent Highway of Tears victim.

The walkers planned to leave on Aug. 1, but couldn’t find sufficient support for food, a support vehicle and gas. It is their second attempt at a healing walk. The first, from Prince Rupert to Prince George, fell apart last year because of lack of support.

“It’s going to be tough. We’ve already seen the first part of our challenges,” Auger said. “[But] I really think the Creator changed our pace. That’s where we had to start, where my daughter was found. It’s like we’re carrying her home ourselves.”

http://www.pgfreepress.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=26&cat=23&id=1048975&more=0

Rle7
09-30-2007, 12:45 PM
Highway Of Tears Benefit
Thursday, October 4
Doors 7pm. Show time 8pm
$20 in advance or at the door







Homebound Films Inc., member of Women in Film and Video Vancouver will team up with Jamie Thomson’s All-Star Band, Sister Says, and Bitterly Devine for a night of live entertainment at The Yale to benefitthe Highway of Tears Trust.

The Highway of Tears Trust was created in order to finance the efforts of Ray Michalko, local Private Investigator in his pursuit for justice and closure for the victims of the Highway of Tears and their families. Michalko is dedicated to solving the Yellowhead Highway 16 West (that runs between Prince George and Prince Rupert, BC) missing and murdered women cases. Information on any of the missing person cases should be reported to Michalko at 604-831-5585 or by email at vpi@telusmail.net.

http://www.theyale.ca/events2.cfm

Rle7
10-13-2007, 08:39 AM
RCMP have expanded their investigation of women who have been murdered or disappeared along B.C.'s so-called Highway of Tears to 18, adding nine more names to the list.

RCMP told a news conference Friday they are conducting an extensive review into 13 deaths and five disappearances connected to the highway that runs about 800 kilometres between here and Prince Rupert on the north coast.

The cases involves women, most of them First Nations, from the B.C. Interior and one women from Hinton, Alta., and date back to 1969.

RCMP said the review will include a three-phase process with geographic and criminal profilers from their major crimes section.

Sgt. Pierre Lemaitre said police still don't know if one person or more people are responsible for the deaths.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/071012/national/highway_of_tears

Alta
10-15-2007, 10:25 AM
The list of names including the ones we already knew and the 9 newly added ones.

- Gloria Moody - Homicide, Williams Lake; 1969
- Micheline Pare - Homicide, Hudson's Hope; 1970
- Gale Weys - Homicide, Clearwater; 1973
- Pamela Darlington - Homicide, Kamloops; 1973
- Monica Ignas - Homicide, Terrace; 1974
- Colleen MacMillen - Homicide, 100 Mile House; 1974
- Monica Jack - Homicide, Merritt; 1978
- Maureen Mosie - Homicide, Kamloops; 1981
- Shelly-ann Bascu - Missing, Hinton, Alta.; 1983
- Alberta Williams - Homicide, Prince Rupert; 1989
- Delphine Nikal - Missing, Smithers; 1990
- Ramona Wilson - Homicide, Smithers; 1994
- Roxanne Thiara - Homicide, Burns Lake; 1994
- Alishia Germaine - Homicide, Prince George; 1994
- Lana Derrick - Missing, Terrace; 1995
- Nicole Hoar - Missing, Prince George; 2002
- Tamara Chipman - Missing, Prince Rupert; 2005
- Aielah Saric Auger - Homicide, Prince George; 2006

http://tinyurl.com/2q3kty

Rle7
03-10-2008, 11:30 AM
It was the larger number of tips from the public on the deaths and disappearances along the Highway of Tears that prompted RCMP to add more officers to the case.

The two members are based at North District headquarters and will be members of the ongoing team of investigators working on the rash of tragedies across the North.

"The two members in Prince George were added due to the volume of tips they were dealing with through Operation E-Pana," said provincial RCMP spokesman Sgt. Pierre Lemaitre. "Obviously a lot of that information is centred in the North, where these members are located."

E-Pana is the operational name given to the Highway of Tears cluster of investigations, which centre on 18 females who have either disappeared or been murdered. Many met their mysterious fate along Highway 16 between Prince George and Prince Rupert.

http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=122052&Itemid=557

shadowraiths
05-07-2008, 05:23 PM
Greetings all, I have finished writing the "Highway of Tears (http://www.shadowraiths.net/?p=31)" article which also includes a crimemap.
Highway of Tears article (http://crimsonshadows.net/content/view/31/49/)
Highway of Tears Crime Map (http://crimsonshadows.net/component/option,com_wrapper/Itemid,29/)

Rle7
05-10-2008, 10:38 AM
Gladys Radek has been hunkered down at her desk for up to 16 hours a day, rallying communities across the country - including Edmonton - to join her on a relay that will "pass a justice baton," across the country.

Next month she and a group of organizers will lace up their shoes for Walk 4 Justice, a trek that will take over two months and raise awareness about the 18 women who have gone missing or been found murdered in the last 30 years on B.C.'s so-called Highway of Tears.

The walk is to begin in Kamloops on June 24 and end in Ottawa on Sept. 11.

Radek said she hopes the event will also draw attention to all of Canada's missing people - regardless of their race or sex.

"We're getting a real outpouring of support, not only from our community but from other communities," she said from Vancouver.

http://www.edmontonsun.com/News/Edmonton/2008/05/10/5527171-sun.html

Capt.
05-12-2008, 12:01 PM
This link should be in this thread

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Pickton

Patience
11-13-2008, 10:50 AM
http://fightforjustice.blogspot.com/2008/05/tree-planting-season-reminder-of.html

Patience
11-18-2008, 06:22 AM
Here are some other missing/murdered people along Highway 16 I have noticed in various articles:


V. Hill’s mother (http://www.sistersinspirit.ca/TakeBacktheHighway_CommunitySummaries_Sept2005.doc ), missing since the 1970’s.


The entire Jack family, missing since 8/2/89 from the Bednesti Lake and Cluculz Lake area south of Highway 16. The only case of a family disappearance in Canada.



Doreen Jack (http://www.doenetwork.us/cases/1480dfbc.html)
Ronald Jack (http://www.doenetwork.us/cases/1376dmbc.html)
Russell Jack (http://www.doenetwork.us/cases/1377dmbc.html), 9
Ryan Jack (http://www.doenetwork.us/cases/1378dmbc.html), 4


Cecilia Anne Nikal (http://www.highwayoftears.ca/Missing%20Index/cecilia-anne-nikal.htm), missing since 1989.


Wendy Ratte (http://www.nampn.doenetwork.us/cases/ratte_wendy.html), 44, missing since 8/18/97


Deena Braem (http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/story.html?id=509d57bc-c4fb-408e-a117-b489499ce725&k=55114) (and here (http://www.pgcrimestoppers.bc.ca/details.php3?crimeID=152)), 16, missing 9/25/99. Her body was found murdered on 12/10/99.


Amanda Gore (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NatNews-north/message/6735) (and here (http://quesnelherald.modblog.com/?show=blogview&blog_id=532341)), 20, her body was found unconscious in Quesnal on 4/19/05. She died later in the hospital. An autopsy revealed she died from alcohol poisoning and exposure but her death remains suspicious.


Brianna Kaye Frederick (http://www.pgfreepress.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=26&cat=23&id=608629&more), 14, missing since 3/10/06


Thanks for posting about these cases. Shadowraiths you are amazing and I will be checking out your site more. May I ask what got you interested in the Highway of tears cases? I would like to speak more with you. Rle-Did you know that another member of the Jack family was murdered in Edmonton. Her name was Bunny. I have spoken with some of the girls in depth out there in the hunting grounds in Edmonton. I received some weird emails after the RCMP Project Kare website was taken over with many handles posting grusome pics and the website being attacked by angry trolls. I will look for them.

Patience
11-18-2008, 06:31 AM
http://missingwomen.blogspot.com/2006/05/bonnie-lynn-jack-liked-to-answer-phone.html

Patience
11-18-2008, 06:38 AM
http://www.kare.ca/

Patience
12-04-2008, 12:02 PM
A very informative blog by Hazel8500 who writes about the Highwy of Tears cases.

http://hazel8500.wordpress.com/2007/10/19/highway-of-tears-longer-than-first-thought/

Alberta's missing persons
http://www.albertamissingpersons.ca/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=28

Patience
12-04-2008, 12:10 PM
Highway of Tears
RCMP step up investigation into 18 dead or missing women along Highway 16 in northern B.C.
http://www.missingpeople.net/rcmp_step_up_investigation.htm

The RCMP announced today it has expanded its Highway of Tears investigation in northern B.C. to include 18 young women who were murdered or went missing since 1969, doubling the number of files being probed.
Investigators met Thursday with families of the murdered and missing women before making the announcement. The expanded probe includes an unsolved murder that took place in Prince George last year and another unsolved murder dating back 38 years.
The geographical scope was also expanded to include unsolved cases along other major highways in B.C., including those leading to Hudson Hope, Kamloops, Merritt, 100 Mile House, and extending as far as Hinton, Alta.
Last year, the police probe listed nine women between the ages of 14 and 25 who were murdered or missing along Highway 16, a desolate two-lane road that runs from Prince Rupert to Prince George and on to Edmonton. It was dubbed the Highway of Tears because of the grief caused by a string of unsolved murders and mysterious disappearances over the years.
There has been speculation that a serial killer has been preying on young women - a large number of the victims were aboriginal - hitchhiking on the highway. The RCMP has always maintained there is no evidence of a serial killer - a position reiterated today.

Patience
12-04-2008, 12:21 PM
http://row.unbc.ca/people/peebles1.html
Frank Peebles
Frank Peebles is a writer/performer based at his family farm in Francois Lake, B.C. He is the editor of the Lakes District News and was until recently the Arts & Entertainment correspondent for the Prince George Free Press.
It was in Prince George that he worked with producer Mike Callewaert and several collaborative friends (Robin Clegg, Drie Ignas, Ryan Castley, Eric Forster, rock band Nudge, Marion Hunt-Doig) to combine creative writing with music/effects. Together they recorded an album's worth of material, some original and some culled from the Canadian pop-lit repository.
Frank is also a playwright, with his play "Cowboys In the Snow" featured this spring at the Prince George Cowboy Festival.
He continues to steal moments to write creatively when his journalism vocation allows. He can be contacted by calling 250-695-6594 or by email frankpeebles@hotmail.com

Frank Peebles used to write about all the Highway of Tears cases. One of his articles was pulled and cannot be viewed on the internet. I believe I still have that article. Mr. Peebles had apparently joined up on the tree planting website that Nicole Hoar belonged to and that sent chills though me. I can see that Frank Peebles was associated with a Drie Ingas and wonder if Mr. Ignas was related to the late Monica Ignas who was murdered in 1974 along the highway of tears.

Here is more on the reporter Peebles.

http://adidem.org/cgi-bin/coranto/viewnews.cgi?id=EEFEAkZuVZncMiJTYe&tmpl=ccases
R. v Peebles et al.

October 3, 2005


Frank Peebles, a reporter for The Prince George Citizen, managed to avoid breaching a publication ban on the prior conviction of an accused, and the fact that his new trial was for an offence he was alleged to have committed while on parole. Unfortunately, he, his editor, and his paper were convicted of contempt, and received fines of $1000, $1000, and $10,000 respectively.

The Court picked up from R. v. Froese, and R. v. CHBC Television, and reiterated the test for contempt as including an examination of whether the publication created a real and substantial risk to the fairness of the accused's trial or the proper administration of justice. The risk must be real, as opposed to remote or hypothetical, and must be substantial, not trifling. The burden of proof is beyond a reasonable doubt.

In this case, the publication led to a mistrial. There was no likelihood that evidence of the prior conviction would have been admissible at trial.

See: R. v Peebles et al. (http://www.canlii.org/bc/cas/bcsc/2005/2005bcsc1387.html)

Patience
12-04-2008, 12:26 PM
http://northword.ca/april-2007/private-investigator-moved-by-highway-of-tears
Travelling the highway of tears When Michalko first became seized by the Highway of Tears case last winter, he generated theories and an action plan that included about 350 people to talk to.

In February 2006, Michalko placed an ad in northern community newspapers, inviting anyone with information on the Highway of Tears murders to contact him. And the phone started to ring: in fact, about 50 tipsters got in touch—arguably more new action than the RCMP have generated in years.
These days, Michalko spends about 40 hours a month on this case. He’s reviewed past media coverage, assessed the landscape and identified more than 760 places between Prince George and Prince Rupert where a body could have easily been disposed of, blanketed the area with information flyers. He’s conducted several trips to northern BC to interview tipsters and “persons of interest”; these conversations have led to contacts with federal prison inmates.
Michalko believes more than one killer is responsible, and says he is currently following leads on Ramona Wilson, whose body was found in 1995 near the Smithers Airport, and Tamara Chipman and Nicole Hoar, who vanished from Highway 16 in 2005 and 2002 respectively.
So far, no cigar. But his investigation has generated a wave of media attention and renewed public and police interest in these cases.

Got a tip for Ray Michalko? Call him at 604.831.5585
For more information on the Highway of Tears disappearances,
visit www.highwayoftears.ca

Patience
08-28-2009, 04:31 PM
PRINCE GEORGE, B.C. - .

RCMP investigators descended on a two-hectare property west of Prince George on Thursday in connection with what they called a "historical homicide."

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/090828/national/prince_george_search

Please let this be a possible break in these cases. My thoughts and prayers go out to the families at this time and always.

Thanks Ray M. I knew you could make a difference.

Patience
08-28-2009, 05:25 PM
A five-acre property on Pinewood Road near Isle Pierre, 50 kilometres west of Prince George, is being combed for key evidence in an unsolved homicide case believed to be linked to the disappearance of Nicole Hoar. She was a 25-year-old treeplanter from Red Deer, Alta., who was last seen hitchhiking to Smithers on June 21, 2002.
Ms. Hoar's parents are reportedly en route to Prince George

http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/20090828210250/local/news/former-property-owner-39person-of-interest-39.html

Patience
08-28-2009, 05:30 PM
http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/20090827210118/local/news/cold-case-cops-searching-at-isle-pierre.html


Investigators from the Prince George detachment and provincial RCMP headquarters are in a rural area of Prince George searching for key evidence in a historical homicide case.


.

Patience
08-28-2009, 05:36 PM
RCMP officers have occupied a five-acre area near Prince George, B.C., to look for the body of 25-year-old Nicole Hoar of Red Deer, Alta.

Hoar, a tree planter, was last seen in June 2002 as she hitchhiked from Prince George to Smithers, B.C., along Highway 16 to surprise her sister

http://www.canada.com/news/Police+search+property+Alberta+woman+remains/1938686/story.html

snip*

Eighteen women have disappeared along the stretch of road between Prince George and Prince Rupert, earning it the ominous name, Highway of Tears

Patience
08-28-2009, 06:58 PM
http://www.albertalocalnews.com/reddeeradvocate/news/Nicole_Hoars_parents_make_statement_as_RCMP_contin ue_BC_site_search_55884867.html

Nicole Hoar's parents make statement as RCMP continue BC site search
Hwy 16 has become known as the Highway of Tears because eight other women disappeared or were murdered along it since 1990.
Jack Hoar had earlier told B.C. media “we will just sit tight and wait and see . . . it would be good to have closure.”

Patience
08-30-2009, 09:32 AM
ISLE PIERRE (NEWS1130) - Police searching a two hectare property near Prince George for the remains of 25-year-old Nicole Hoar have now narrowed their search on a well. A neighbour tipped police off the property owner - Leland Switzer, who's in jail for killing his brother two days after Hoar went missing -- had poured diesel down the well and lit it on fire.

http://www.news1130.com/news/local/more.jsp?content=20090830_084106_10504

Rle7
10-29-2009, 09:51 AM
The remains of a person discovered in a gravel pit near Prince George, B.C., are not those of a young Red Deer woman who disappeared seven years ago, a police official said Wednesday.

Const. Gary Godwin of Prince George RCMP said the remains were identified as a woman but they are not releasing the identity at this time.
“They were definitely that of a human,” he added.

He said the remains were not those of hitchhiker Nicole Hoar, 25, of Red Deer who was last seen outside of Prince George in June 2002

http://www.albertalocalnews.com/reddeeradvocate/news/local/Remains_found_in_BC_not_those_of_missing_Red_Deer_ woman_67202157.html

Summersolstice
11-09-2009, 03:10 PM
She's not Nicole, but will she join the others on the "Highway of Tears" victim list?

http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20091031/bc_Stuchenko_091031/20091031?hub=BritishColumbiaHome

Six children without their mother. The Otway gravel pit is on the way to Isle St. Pierre.

Danaya
11-09-2009, 05:06 PM
She's not Nicole, but will she join the others on the "Highway of Tears" victim list?

http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20091031/bc_Stuchenko_091031/20091031?hub=BritishColumbiaHome

Six children without their mother. The Otway gravel pit is on the way to Isle St. Pierre.

I don't think so, she wasn't hitch hiking was she? Wasn't she in the area for over a week?

Danaya
11-09-2009, 05:10 PM
Kinda OT, but I remember hitch hiking across Canada five or six years ago when I was 16. I am lucky to be alive as once I stood on a dark highway all alone outside of Ontario near the mountains and hitch hiked to BC with a friend younger than myself. I remember being dropped off all by myself in downtown Montreal with no money in my pockets. I never had any problems, I always thought I had good radar but looking back, I realize it was merely luck. You can never really tell when a person is going to go off the edge.

Summersolstice
11-09-2009, 11:26 PM
I don't think so, she wasn't hitch hiking was she? Wasn't she in the area for over a week?

I wondered about this announcement:

http://www.globaltvbc.com/world/Highway+Tears+announcement+expected+this+weekend/2192023/story.html

Has anyone heard anything?

SewingDeb
11-09-2009, 11:48 PM
No arrests pending on highway of tears
Parents of missing and slain women meet with B.C. investigators


http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/british-columbia/no-arrests-pending-in-highway-of-tears-case/article1357250/

Summersolstice
11-10-2009, 12:18 AM
No arrests pending on highway of tears
Parents of missing and slain women meet with B.C. investigators


http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/british-columbia/no-arrests-pending-in-highway-of-tears-case/article1357250/

Thanks, just found it.

Summersolstice
11-10-2009, 12:32 AM
This still bothers me:

http://www.theprovince.com/life/summer-guide/localsknowquiz/sexually+assaulted+hitchhiker+declared+dangerous+o ffender/1866728/story.html

How can the police dismiss the possibility of this person being involved in all the cases? They've never said.

Summersolstice
11-10-2009, 10:11 AM
Here is a case involving a former long-haul trucker:

http://www.edmontonsun.com/news/alberta/2009/11/05/11652416.html
http://www2.canada.com/calgaryherald/news/story.html?id=1c1e6c1a-92d3-4e91-883e-f220237da11f

This individual hunted for a victim for two weeks until he found a girl at a gas station. He followed her home, where he kidnapped and cut her (leaving a permanent scar on her face), then took her to his trailer, where he sexually assaulted her for two days. His MO was imitating a police officer. I would be shocked if this was a first offence.

He pleaded guilty, and will be sentenced in December. The Crown wants life.

Given what we know from the FBI, wouldn't it make sense for the police to check the log books of long-haul truckers who plead/are found guilty of sexual assault/kidnapping? The log book could provide important clues, if any of the dates and locations match up to unsolved kidnapping/sexual assault/murders/missing persons cases along the route.

This individual is from Red Deer, Nicole Hoar's hometown.

Summersolstice
11-10-2009, 10:29 AM
I don't think so, she wasn't hitch hiking was she? Wasn't she in the area for over a week?

If you look at the updated list of victims, not all were hitch hiking. Some disappeared while working as prostitutes, and one was found in a gravel pit near Terrace. An isolated gravel pit seems a likely place for a customer to take a prostitute. Whatever the "commonalities" are, only the police know.

http://www.primetimecrime.com/Recent/Murder/Highway%20of%20tears.htm

Summersolstice
11-10-2009, 02:58 PM
Here's another case that makes me wonder. Cindy Burk was hitchhiking when she was picked up and murdered:

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2009/03/16/bc-prince-george-trial.html

Thinking of Prince George as part of the northwest transportation corridor, this could be why the police added more names to the list. This could explain why a girl from Hinton was added to the names on the HOT list.

Summersolstice
11-10-2009, 03:30 PM
Many things about these cases have bothered me over the years. I have been wondering about different ways of looking at the cases of the missing women in northern/central B.C. One is certainly to look purely at geography, and those missing in Prince George and along the Highway of Tears.

Another is to look at missing native women.

Another is to look at transportation corridors, and the way people move between communities. This could explain why the net has been cast further. If you live in the communities in the area, you know certain things. Like the fact that people from Fort St. John often travel to Dawson Creek for shopping and appointments. That oilfield workers often travel between Fort St. John, Dawson Creek, Grande Prairie, Alberta and Edmonton. That people travelling from points in Alberta to Prince George often take the route that passes through Edmonton, Grande Prairie, Dawson Creek and PG. That hospital care for many northern B.C. residents is found in Grande Prairie, Alberta. You'll know, too, that Highway 16 out of Edmonton, through Hinton and Jasper, is a route to Prince George, but not a good one in the winter.

Certainly, there is a very strong need for geographic profiling in the Highway of Tears. Remember Kim Rossmo, who called for this in the DTES missing women's cases?

Summersolstice
11-10-2009, 04:07 PM
And this is all for now from me:

http://h2o.law.harvard.edu/ViewProject.do?projectID=828

Summersolstice
11-10-2009, 06:34 PM
http://www.lastlinkontheleft.com/e2005meyer.html

Maybe he is, Mr. Pitt. Maybe he is.

Summersolstice
11-11-2009, 12:12 PM
With Prince Rupert as a gateway to Asia for imported goods, what else is it a gateway for? Illegal drugs? If so, Asian gangs and motorcycle gangs running that industry would need to travel up and down the Highway of Tears to Prince George. These same people run prostitution rings.

As far as legitimate imports, truckers use the corridor. The car ferry also lands there. So, isolated as it may appear on a map, the highway sees travellers from near and far.

Thinking of the highway out of Dawson Creek, this is Mile Zero of the Alaska Highway. Again, isolated as it appears, this route serves as a transport corridor for goods and people bound for Alaska. During the summer months, this road sees travellers including tourists, Alaska residents and personnel and equipment bound for the military bases. Some take the QEII north through Edmonton, then head west through Grande Prairie, Dawson Creek and north through Fort St. John. Others travel by car ferry, landing in Prince Rupert, going through Prince George, then north through Dawson Creek and Fort St. John.

Tourists are summer travellers for the most part in the north. The regular traffic, people who are familiar with the area and communities along the way, is year-round.

Summersolstice
11-11-2009, 04:51 PM
I don't think we can ignore the goings-on in Prince George, either. It's past time to take a good, hard look at that situation:

http://www.firstnationsdrum.com/Spring%202007/February/missingwomen-ch2.html

Summersolstice
11-13-2009, 02:38 PM
This tripe does link a serial killer to some of the highway disappearances in B.C. and Alberta, as well as disappearances in Washington state and other locales:

http://www.francesfarmersrevenge.com/stuff/serialkillers/olsonstory.htm

Patience
11-14-2009, 10:13 AM
I wondered about this announcement:

http://www.globaltvbc.com/world/Highway+Tears+announcement+expected+this+weekend/2192023/story.html

Has anyone heard anything?

Yes, Highway of Tears inquiry possible. Possible??? I say it is an emergency.

http://www.globaltvbc.com/world/Highway+Tears+inquiry+possible+attorney+general/2220244/story.html

Summersolstice
11-15-2009, 09:49 PM
Yes, Highway of Tears inquiry possible. Possible??? I say it is an emergency.

http://www.globaltvbc.com/world/Highway+Tears+inquiry+possible+attorney+general/2220244/story.html

It sounds like it'll take more convincing for that to happen. Meanwhile, it also sounds like RM's investigation is moving along.

I would not be surprised at all if JS was added to the list. I have to wonder about who runs the prostitution/drug rings, and if they live near the highway.

Summersolstice
12-03-2009, 07:34 PM
I wonder if this guy has been checked out for any links to the Highway of Tears. His daughter was on Oprah today, with Dr. Phil. Here we go, another trucker:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keith_Hunter_Jesperson

The Green River killer, the Happy Face killer (from Chilliwack), the Pig Farmer, all so close.

sillybilly
12-13-2009, 02:10 PM
Two current articles, both containing numerous links to other related stories:

"Hunt to determine if serial killer is preying on females along B.C. highways"

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/vanished/index1.html

Picture gallery "Faces of those who have vanished along B.C. and Alberta highways"

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/vanished/Gallery+Unsolved+cases+missing+murdered+women/2331572/story.html

I know we have a few Canadian posters here, but with 4+ million population in BC, and 33+ million Canadians nationwide, where are all the other peeps who should be giving a sweet dam# about these cases?

Summersolstice
12-13-2009, 09:08 PM
Two current articles, both containing numerous links to other related stories:

"Hunt to determine if serial killer is preying on females along B.C. highways"

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/vanished/index1.html

Picture gallery "Faces of those who have vanished along B.C. and Alberta highways"

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/vanished/Gallery+Unsolved+cases+missing+murdered+women/2331572/story.html

I know we have a few Canadian posters here, but with 4+ million population in BC, and 33+ million Canadians nationwide, where are all the other peeps who should be giving a sweet dam# about these cases?

Good question. I think back to the missing women cases in the Lower Mainland. It's good to see that the RCMP have been looking at the HOT cases in a new light. Did that happen as a result of Nicole Hoar's disappearance? She didn't fit the profile of having a "high-risk" lifestyle.

sillybilly
12-14-2009, 05:15 AM
Good question. I think back to the missing women cases in the Lower Mainland. It's good to see that the RCMP have been looking at the HOT cases in a new light. Did that happen as a result of Nicole Hoar's disappearance? She didn't fit the profile of having a "high-risk" lifestyle.

"High-risk" is not limited to the sex and/or drug trade .. it includes hitch-hiking, which is the most notable high-risk activity for Highway of Tears victims (i.e. Nicole Hoar was known to be hitch-hiking from Prince George to Smithers.) A couple of Highway of Tears victims may have been involved in the sex trade or involved with drugs, while some were not engaged in any of those high-risk activities whatsoever (off the top of my head, Gloria Levina Moody and Monica Jack, possibly Shelly Ann Bacsu).

I think the RCMP commitment to solve these cases has always been there, just that increased funding, new investigators and newer techniques/technology (i.e. advent of ViCLAS in the 1990s) are helping to shed new light. It does seem that Nicole's disappearance brought more media attention to the Highway of Tears. It is a long-standing misperception that she was the first and only caucasian victim on the Highway of Tears.

Summersolstice
12-14-2009, 01:05 PM
"High-risk" is not limited to the sex and/or drug trade .. it includes hitch-hiking, which is the most notable high-risk activity for Highway of Tears victims (i.e. Nicole Hoar was known to be hitch-hiking from Prince George to Smithers.) A couple of Highway of Tears victims may have been involved in the sex trade or involved with drugs, while some were not engaged in any of those high-risk activities whatsoever (off the top of my head, Gloria Levina Moody and Monica Jack, possibly Shelly Ann Bacsu).

I think the RCMP commitment to solve these cases has always been there, just that increased funding, new investigators and newer techniques/technology (i.e. advent of ViCLAS in the 1990s) are helping to shed new light. It does seem that Nicole's disappearance brought more media attention to the Highway of Tears. It is a long-standing misperception that she was the first and only caucasian victim on the Highway of Tears.

Yes, hitchhiking is risky. However, this term has commonly become known as involving drug use/sex trade. Thank the Pickton case for that.

This unfortunate term lends itself to value judgments about the victims, and makes some people think that the victims in some way deserved their fate. I've seen many comments on news sites about "wasting money" investigating a bunch of murders of women who didn't matter. These websites seem to have closed their comments and removed the remarks today. I don't think it is an accident that the many of the victims are people that someone thinks will not be missed.

Indeed, Nicole isn't the only caucasian. She is, however, an outsider, and the one whose disappearance seems to have stimulated new interest in the HOT. Having persistent family members, who are able to get the media and public to pay attention, helps. Nicole's family has been working with Ray Michalko, and he, too, is a considerable force in keeping the public involved and interested in the HOT cases.

Here's today's installment in a series:

http://www.kelowna.com/2009/12/14/possible-suspects-haunt-detectives-there-has-never-been-an-arrest-in-the-highway-of-tears-mystery/

What kind of person provides information because they wonder if the police have gone over a crime scene with a fine-toothed comb?

A man or group of men who live in the area, rather than a serial killer? How have they kept this so quiet? Surely there are spouses, friends, neighbors and co-workers who have suspicions.

Summersolstice
12-14-2009, 04:36 PM
A taxi was the place Amanda Gore was last seen by her friends. Amanda was an acquaintance of Deena Braem, whose disappearance has some rather unusual circumstances posted on the web in the form of a documentary testimony by a witness from Quesnel.

http://www.mail-archive.com/natnews-north@yahoogroups.com/msg00834.html

sillybilly
12-14-2009, 05:33 PM
Yes, hitchhiking is risky. However, this term has commonly become known as involving drug use/sex trade. Thank the Pickton case for that.

This unfortunate term lends itself to value judgments about the victims, and makes some people think that the victims in some way deserved their fate. I've seen many comments on news sites about "wasting money" investigating a bunch of murders of women who didn't matter. These websites seem to have closed their comments and removed the remarks today. I don't think it is an accident that the many of the victims are people that someone thinks will not be missed.

Indeed, Nicole isn't the only caucasian. She is, however, an outsider, and the one whose disappearance seems to have stimulated new interest in the HOT. Having persistent family members, who are able to get the media and public to pay attention, helps. Nicole's family has been working with Ray Michalko, and he, too, is a considerable force in keeping the public involved and interested in the HOT cases.

Here's today's installment in a series:

http://www.kelowna.com/2009/12/14/possible-suspects-haunt-detectives-there-has-never-been-an-arrest-in-the-highway-of-tears-mystery/

What kind of person provides information because they wonder if the police have gone over a crime scene with a fine-toothed comb?

A man or group of men who live in the area, rather than a serial killer? How have they kept this so quiet? Surely there are spouses, friends, neighbors and co-workers who have suspicions.

BBM

I know that is the common understanding of the term HRMP, and that is why readers need to know that hitch-hiking is an official, additional factor that the HRMPP considers in their victimology assessment. Because this thread relates to Highway of Tears victims, it is important that people understand the HOT victims do NOT appear to fall into the same category that includes involvement in drugs and the sex trade ... they merely meet the HRMP criterion due to their high-risk behaviour/habit of hitch-hiking.

There will always be those who pass moral judgment on the Pickton and PJ KARE victims due to sex and drug trade involvement, but they cannot affix that moral sticker to those girls and women who have disappeared or been murdered along the Highway of Tears.

PS: I have no clue why my word "Smithers" is appearing in red in my previous post. I didn't put in any special formatting, and it seems to come and go between red and black in a rather willy-nilly fashion.

sillybilly
12-14-2009, 05:39 PM
"A Five-Part Investigative series
A Vancouver Sun investigation tells the full story, for the first time, of the Highway of Tears victims and raises questions about other similar unsolved cases."

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/vanished/index2.html

I have searched for the additional "Parts" to "Canada's National Tragedy" that was started a few weeks ago, but can't find it. Maybe the above 5 part series is the continuation. Dunno :waitasec:

Summersolstice
12-14-2009, 05:53 PM
"A Five-Part Investigative series
A Vancouver Sun investigation tells the full story, for the first time, of the Highway of Tears victims and raises questions about other similar unsolved cases."

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/vanished/index2.html

I have searched for the additional "Parts" to "Canada's National Tragedy" that was started a few weeks ago, but can't find it. Maybe the above 5 part series is the continuation. Dunno :waitasec:

I couldn't bring up the current Vancouver Sun series earlier today, which is why I posted another link. Must be trouble on their website.

The whole business about "high risk" is, in fact, why there seems to have been a lack of interest from the general public. It is very important for people to understand the definition the police are using. Some of these women were not believed to be hitchhiking, but walking along the side of the highway. And that is something that could happen to anyone.

sillybilly
12-16-2009, 08:48 PM
http://www.vancouversun.com/news/vanished/Monica+Jack+headed+home+bike+never+arrived/2345239/story.html

This is the first time I've seen Monica's biological father's name, "Philip Swakum". Interesting that Monica's remains were found near a logging road on Swakum Mountain, approx 20 kms away from where her bike was found nearer her Nicola Lake home that she was returning to that day. Could be coincidence, but have to wonder if the perp had an issue with the dad.

Summersolstice
12-16-2009, 11:54 PM
The hundreds of missing aboriginal women in Canada have a new voice:

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia/story/2009/09/22/polaris-winner.html

Summersolstice
12-17-2009, 12:01 AM
http://www.vancouversun.com/news/vanished/Monica+Jack+headed+home+bike+never+arrived/2345239/story.html

This is the first time I've seen Monica's biological father's name, "Philip Swakum". Interesting that Monica's remains were found near a logging road on Swakum Mountain, approx 20 kms away from where her bike was found nearer her Nicola Lake home that she was returning to that day. Could be coincidence, but have to wonder if the perp had an issue with the dad.

It's a sad statement that a 12-year-old girl riding her bike on her way home is considered as having engaged in a "high-risk" activity. That's the issue I have with this blanket categorization of women and girls on the list. It seems more like a value judgment than useful information.

sillybilly
12-17-2009, 02:02 PM
It's a sad statement that a 12-year-old girl riding her bike on her way home is considered as having engaged in a "high-risk" activity. That's the issue I have with this blanket categorization of women and girls on the list. It seems more like a value judgment than useful information.

While specific activities may land a victim in the "high risk" category, it would be naive to assume that is the ONLY factor that includes a case in the jurisdiction of a particular taskforce. Pretty safe to say that other factors (available evidence, topographical/geographical patterns, persons of interest, etc.) come into play in determining which cases may or may not be connected. True, Monica was not hitch-hiking, but she was riding her bike on a major thoroughfare, her bike was found beside the road, so chances are she was accosted by someone travelling that route as opposed to the local priest. Because other victims were known to be hitch-hiking on a major thoroughfare, it may be the crime is opportunistic simply based on their proximity to the highway.

The "blanket categorization" is probably done moreso by the public than LE. The same way that the public believes cases were not being investigated because the victims were native ... when, according to my records, there are AT LEAST 8 caucasian victims on the list.

Summersolstice
12-18-2009, 11:52 AM
While specific activities may land a victim in the "high risk" category, it would be naive to assume that is the ONLY factor that includes a case in the jurisdiction of a particular taskforce. Pretty safe to say that other factors (available evidence, topographical/geographical patterns, persons of interest, etc.) come into play in determining which cases may or may not be connected. True, Monica was not hitch-hiking, but she was riding her bike on a major thoroughfare, her bike was found beside the road, so chances are she was accosted by someone travelling that route as opposed to the local priest. Because other victims were known to be hitch-hiking on a major thoroughfare, it may be the crime is opportunistic simply based on their proximity to the highway.

The "blanket categorization" is probably done moreso by the public than LE. The same way that the public believes cases were not being investigated because the victims were native ... when, according to my records, there are AT LEAST 8 caucasian victims on the list.

I think it is a very interesting coincidence that a private investigator starting doing his own investigations and the police set up this particular investigative team right around the same time, in 2005. The Pickton investigation in the Lower Mainland had been getting quite a bit of attention by then.

Native groups had called for a task force/inquiry on many occasions and were told nothing. Surely letting them know that this has been in place for four years would not have harmed the investigation in any way. Like the Pickton case, native groups have been an important voice for the missing, regardless of race. Without their persistence, what would have happened?

sillybilly
12-20-2009, 04:43 PM
I think it is a very interesting coincidence that a private investigator starting doing his own investigations and the police set up this particular investigative team right around the same time, in 2005. The Pickton investigation in the Lower Mainland had been getting quite a bit of attention by then.

Native groups had called for a task force/inquiry on many occasions and were told nothing. Surely letting them know that this has been in place for four years would not have harmed the investigation in any way. Like the Pickton case, native groups have been an important voice for the missing, regardless of race. Without their persistence, what would have happened?

BBM

Would be interested in knowing why you find that an interesting coincidence. E-Panna was formed in 2005, and there are varying accounts of when RM started doing his own thing (January 2006 or May 2006, depending on which article you read).

I'm not good on the semantics re the buzzwords "task force" when the phrase basically means a team of investigators. From what I can see, these cases WERE being pursued by investigators through the years, just not within a structured, formally dedicated task force. Regardless of the term, there will always be a turnover in the experience/skill levels of the personnel involved in either formation, and the more recent personnel have the benefit of more financial resources and advanced technology ... so I'm not real clear on what the specific concerns are. Example: the first victim on E-Pana's list, Gloria Levina Moody, was killed in 1969. In 1998 a police officer visited the family to say the three main POIs in the case were now dead. I highly doubt that LE reached that conclusion 27 years later without having members actively pursuing an investigation into her death.

As for some previous discussion re Nicole Hoar's case being the one to bring new attention to the Highway of Tears victims .. not surprising given she disappeared in June 2002, just 4 months after the Pickton farm was uncovered in February 2002. Once the media attention was garnered as a result of the Pickton farm, the Highway of Tears cases could only benefit from the publicity that was already established, and fortunately, that is what happened.

Summersolstice
01-02-2010, 07:09 PM
BBM

Would be interested in knowing why you find that an interesting coincidence. E-Panna was formed in 2005, and there are varying accounts of when RM started doing his own thing (January 2006 or May 2006, depending on which article you read).

I'm not good on the semantics re the buzzwords "task force" when the phrase basically means a team of investigators. From what I can see, these cases WERE being pursued by investigators through the years, just not within a structured, formally dedicated task force. Regardless of the term, there will always be a turnover in the experience/skill levels of the personnel involved in either formation, and the more recent personnel have the benefit of more financial resources and advanced technology ... so I'm not real clear on what the specific concerns are. Example: the first victim on E-Pana's list, Gloria Levina Moody, was killed in 1969. In 1998 a police officer visited the family to say the three main POIs in the case were now dead. I highly doubt that LE reached that conclusion 27 years later without having members actively pursuing an investigation into her death.

As for some previous discussion re Nicole Hoar's case being the one to bring new attention to the Highway of Tears victims .. not surprising given she disappeared in June 2002, just 4 months after the Pickton farm was uncovered in February 2002. Once the media attention was garnered as a result of the Pickton farm, the Highway of Tears cases could only benefit from the publicity that was already established, and fortunately, that is what happened.

It is my opinion that the involvement of the PI has been responsible for a great deal of the publicity this case has received recently.

sillybilly
02-14-2010, 03:17 PM
Bumping this thread for Valentine's Day ... and thinking of all these women and girls as memorial gatherings are taking place throughout Canada today.

To those who are gone, may you rest in peace.

To those who are yet to be found, believe in the sun even though it is not shining.

Hearts are with you.

LadyL
02-14-2010, 03:27 PM
A taxi was the place Amanda Gore was last seen by her friends. Amanda was an acquaintance of Deena Braem, whose disappearance has some rather unusual circumstances posted on the web in the form of a documentary testimony by a witness from Quesnel.

http://www.mail-archive.com/natnews-north@yahoogroups.com/msg00834.html

?? I'm confused ... was this link meant to go to the documentary?

Patience
06-25-2010, 06:44 AM
"A Five-Part Investigative series
A Vancouver Sun investigation tells the full story, for the first time, of the Highway of Tears victims and raises questions about other similar unsolved cases."

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/vanished/index2.html

I have searched for the additional "Parts" to "Canada's National Tragedy" that was started a few weeks ago, but can't find it. Maybe the above 5 part series is the continuation. Dunno :waitasec:

All 5 parts of Vanishing Point are working now. Thank you SB.
http://www.vancouversun.com/news/vanished/index2.html

A Five-Part Investigative series
A Vancouver Sun investigation tells the full story, for the first time, of the Highway of Tears victims and raises questions about other similar unsolved cases.

luckyducky
10-16-2010, 12:35 PM
Families await results of autopsy on woman’s body found near 'Highway of Tears' Families of two missing women are anxiously awaiting results of an autopsy to be conducted Wednesday of a partially decomposed body discovered outside a Prince George park. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/british-columbia/families-await-results-of-autopsy-on-womans-body-found-near-highway-of-tears/article1754320/

luckyducky
10-16-2010, 12:43 PM
Just found this - I believe this is in relation to the item I just posted above.
RCMP confirm murder of missing Prince George woman



Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/RCMP+confirm+murder+missing+Prince+George+woman/3682774/story.html#ixzz12XbTmDYe

luckyducky
10-17-2010, 12:34 PM
Cops ID remains of woman found near Highway of Tears



Cynthia Frances Maas, 35, was murdered: police




Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Cops+remains+woman+found+near+Highway+Tears/3683087/story.html#ixzz12dPWGQhp

dotr
01-03-2011, 07:41 PM
I hope this is posted in the correct thread.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2011/01/03/16746586.html
TORONTO - Gladys Radek doesn't know what happened to her niece, but she knows enough to refer to her in the past tense.

"I think about her every morning and the wonder does go in my mind - was she raped? Was she beaten?" the Vancouver woman said during a recent visit to Toronto where she was raising awareness about missing and murdered women in Canada.

"And I always ask why, why Tamara?"

dotr
02-11-2011, 08:46 PM
Vancouver police call out to sex victims
Last Updated: Friday, February 11, 2011 | 3:26 PM PT Comments31Recommend5.
CBC News
Vancouver Police have taken the extraordinary step of issuing a public plea for victims of a man called Martin Tremblay.

Police have taken the extraordinary step of issuing a public plea for alleged victims of Martin Tremblay. (VPD)
Tremblay is currently facing four counts of trafficking cocaine and one charge of possession of cocaine for the purposes of trafficking, but has a criminal record for plying teenage Aboriginal girls with alcohol and drugs and then sexually assaulting them.

Police believe there are more victims and they're asking them to come forward in an effort to keep Tremblay in jail.

Tremblay, 45, was convicted of five counts of sexual assault in 2002 and sentenced to 14 months after he was found guilty of plying five aboriginal teenaged girls with drugs and alcohol and then videotaping his sex acts with them after they passed out.

In March 2010, Tremblay was linked to two teenaged girls who died within hours of each other.

Kayla LaLonde, 16, and Martha Hernandez, 17, had partied at Tremblay's home the night before they died as a result of overdosing on a combination of drugs and alcohol.

Lalonde was found dead on a Burnaby street after witnesses said she had been dumped from a van.

Hernandez died later after being rushed by ambulance from Tremblay's Richmond home.

No charges have been laid in connection with the girls' deaths.

More charges in alleged terror ring
Police also said charges have been laid against 11 individuals for crimes targeting vulnerable people in the Downtown Eastside. In all, 48 charges have been laid including extortion, sexual assault, forcible confinement and assault with a weapon


Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2011/02/11/bc-dtes-charges.html#ixzz1Dhm371wI

Rle7
02-15-2011, 02:03 AM
Police in Prince George, B.C. are collecting DNA samples from cab drivers, reportedly as part of their investigation into the dozens of murders and disappearances of women in the northern part of the province.

Since the late 1960s, more than two dozen women have been killed or have gone missing in the area, many of them along the remote stretch of Highway 16 between Prince George and Prince Rupert, which has been dubbed the Highway of Tears.

The RCMP has been investigating 18 of the cases under the name Project E-PANA.

In an effort to generate leads, police have been taking DNA samples from taxi drivers in the city, but declined to discuss the practice late Monday evening.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/british-columbia/police-collecting-cabbies-dna-in-highway-of-tears-probe/article1907365/?cmpid=rss1

dotr
02-19-2011, 07:24 PM
Sat Feb 19 2011Be the first to Comment 0 Recommend RCMP want help identifying Jane Doe linked to Pickton’s farm
http://www.thespec.com/news/canada/article/490119--rcmp-want-help-identifying-jane-doe-linked-to-pickton-s-farm
VANCOUVER RCMP want the public’s help in solving the 16-year-old mystery of a woman whose partial remains were found on serial killer Robert Pickton’s farm.

Cpl. Annie Linteau says Mounties have reached out to police around the world to try and figure out Jane Doe’s identity, and will be posting a sketch of what she may have looked like on their website in the hope that a member of the public may recognize her.

Half her skull, with the vertebra attached, was found in 1995 by a man filling a water bottle at a creek in Mission, B.C.

dotr
02-21-2011, 12:06 AM
http://www.globaltvbc.com/story.html?id=4316099
Police release old sketch to identify Pickton-linked Jane Doe Lori Culbert, Postmedia News: Saturday, February 19, 2011

WhyaDuck?
02-21-2011, 06:32 AM
Found Deceased Task Force Releases Sketch Of Jane Doe From Pickton Farm - Websleuths Crime Sleuthing Community

WhyaDuck?
02-21-2011, 06:46 AM
Hi folks - I just realized the link in the OP to this thread no longer functions, so I am locking this thread as defunct.

Please direct your posts throughout the forum as you see fit - the media sticky always needs work, for example. And the individual victim threads could use some attention.

Western Canada's Highway of Tears - Websleuths Crime Sleuthing Community


Thanks!