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Doyle
02-09-2004, 05:51 AM
Thousands of visitors are expected to be in Juárez on Saturday to demand the resolution of serial-like murders of women in this Mexican border town.
http://www.borderlandnews.com/stories/borderland/20040208-78887.shtml

Doyle
02-13-2004, 05:30 AM
While federal investigators dug for corpses in a nearby yard, Deonicio Delgadillo Picazo watched over his 11-year-old daughter, who was playing on a seesaw. Delgadillo said he was not surprised that 17 state police officers had been implicated in the deaths of 12 people found buried in the neighborhood. But he was shocked, he said, that some of those policemen were in jail
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0212juarez12.html

maggiemay
12-23-2004, 02:08 AM
I Was In Ciudad Juarez Last Month To Visit My Grandmother And Her Neighbor Happends To Be The Mother Of A Murder Victim, I Would Talk To The Lady And It Just Broke My Heart When She Talked About Her Daughter, How Her Daughter Convinced Her To Let Her Have A Part Time Job So That She Could Save Money For A Sweet Fifteen Party, The Mother Worked Night Shift So She Would Get Off At 6:am Am And The Daughter Started Her Part Time At 7:00am So They Would Always Greet Each Other When One Was Going Home And The Other To Work And She Remembers The Day That She Was Going Home From Work And Didn't See Her Daughter And She Thought That Maybe She Was Sick And Stayed Home ,,but When She Got Home Her Youngest Son Told Her That She Never Came Home,,so She Went To The Police, But Told Her " Don't Worry Mam She's Probably Parting And Lost Track Of Time" Nine Days Later Her Body Was Found She Was Raped, Torture, Her Breast Had Been Cut She Had Bites All Over Her Body.. I Swear I Wouldnt Even Go To The Store By Myself Even In The Day, My Hubby Wanted To Take A Walk To The Little Mountains And I Did Not Go Because I've Heard That Bodies Are Found There Everyday.

absinthe
05-29-2008, 04:32 PM
No contemporary human rights crisis in Mexico has moved world public opinion more than the rapes and murders of young women in Ciudad Juarez and the state of Chihuahua. Mass protests stretching from the U.S.-Mexico border to Europe and to India have demanded justice. Even Hollywood took up the theme, when it recently filmed a major drama about the Juarez crimes starring Antonio Banderas, Jennifer Lopez, and Martin Sheen, called "Bordertown." The multi-million dollar film was withheld from release on the big screen in the United States for unexplained reasons.
For more than a decade now, investigators from the United Nations, Inter-American Commission for Human Rights, Amnesty International, International Human Rights Federation, Washington Office on Latin America, and even the Mexico government's own National Human Rights Commission have visited the border and issued reports that harshly criticize law enforcement's responses to the brutal killings.
The European Parliament, U.S. Congress, New Mexico State Senate, and other entities have passed resolutions condemning the femicides. A police hotline to receive anonymous tips was established across the border from Ciudad Juarez in El Paso, Texas.
Despite the international outcry, scores—perhaps hundreds—of murders and disappearances of young women remain unsolved. Refusing to let the memories of their loved ones die, mothers of femicide victims and their supporters are once again taking to the streets. On March 8, International Women's Day 2008, protestors from both sides of the border filed past the familiar cross monument in honor of murdered women that guards one of the entrances to Ciudad Juarez from El Paso at the foot of the Santa Fe Bridge.

more at link http://www.newspapertree.com/features/2461-world-wide-attention-but-on-the-ground-femicides-continue

absinthe
05-29-2008, 04:38 PM
TruTv link http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/serial_killers/predators/ciudad_juarez/index.html

blaize
05-29-2008, 04:43 PM
Thanks for reminding me again of these atrocities Absinthe. This keeps coming back and I can't understand how the Mexican government can sit back and let this insanity go on.

(Source (http://www.newspapertree.com/features/2461-world-wide-attention-but-on-the-ground-femicides-continue))

Other researchers, including El Paso author Diana Washington Valdez, who documented murders from 1993 to 2005 (including 120-130 sex-related crimes) for her book "Harvest of Women," have reported far more murders than the 413 recognized by Gonzalez. If killings from the last three years are added to Washington's figures, the toll of women murdered for all motives in Ciudad Juarez exceeds 500 since 1993.
What Ciudad Juarez sociologist Dr. Julia Monarrez calls "organized serial killings," in which as many as eight bodies were recovered at once from a single location, and other murders highly suspected of involving organized crime, stand out as unpunished crimes to this day. Drug traffickers, gang members, individual serial killers, businessmen, and even officers from the same agency tasked with investigating the crimes have been implicated in different press accounts.

absinthe
05-29-2008, 04:44 PM
Welcome, Blaize! i was hoping to spark a discussion and perhaps get closer to some answers...

absinthe
05-29-2008, 04:50 PM
As for how the Mexican government can "let this insanity go on"...I'd venture to wager that it's because some pretty high-ranking officials are involved in the killings.

believe09
05-30-2008, 11:39 AM
For those of you who are familiar with Frank Bender's pioneering work regarding Facial Reconstruction, know that he is donating his time and abilities to reconstruct the women found tossed like garbage during this incredible story of murder....and to date there has been little notice paid this crime against humanity!!! He co-authored this book with Ted Botha...please consider giving it a read.

http://www.randomhouse.com/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9781400065332

Pepper
05-30-2008, 11:52 AM
Many of the murdered and missing are underage Americans crossing the border to drink and party. This is not getting the press it deserves! :behindbar

absinthe
05-30-2008, 12:04 PM
Many of the murdered and missing are underage Americans crossing the border to drink and party. This is not getting the press it deserves! :behindbar


Really? links please!

The particular serial killings that I am referring to overwhelmingly target young, dark-skinned women from the interior/South of Mexico.

absinthe
05-30-2008, 12:05 PM
For those of you who are familiar with Frank Bender's pioneering work regarding Facial Reconstruction, know that he is donating his time and abilities to reconstruct the women found tossed like garbage during this incredible story of murder....and to date there has been little notice paid this crime against humanity!!! He co-authored this book with Ted Botha...please consider giving it a read.

http://www.randomhouse.com/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9781400065332


I am going to order that book this weekend!

Pepper
05-30-2008, 12:18 PM
Really? links please!

The particular serial killings that I am referring to overwhelmingly target young, dark-skinned women from the interior/South of Mexico.

http://www.amw.com/features/feature_story_detail.cfm?id=293
The Kidnapping Epidemic
But, not only fighting is erupting in the streets of Mexico. Mexico's lawlessness - an outbreak of kidnappings for ransom, brutal gunfights among rival drug cartels and escalating violence - has now crossed the border and touched many American families.

There stories are similar. Americans cross the Mexican-American border from Laredo, Texas to Nuevo Laredo, Mexico to celebrate birthdays, holidays, or to shop or just to enjoy another culture. But, one by one, these Americans failed to return home.

The families of the missing Americans say they were oblivious to the violence in Mexico until their families were shattered by it. Now, they are paralyzed by fear.

Thirty-one Americans have been reported as kidnapped just across the Mexican border. Seventeen are unaccounted for, 12 have returned and two have been confirmed killed, according to U.S. officials. Simple math draws a scary conclusion: there are more than a dozen Americans somewhere in the Nuevo Laredo area of Mexico - dead or alive.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1458005/posts

Kidnapping, Murder Sweep Nuevo Laredo (41 Americans go missing)
Fox News ^ | 8/05/05

Posted on Friday, August 05, 2005 8:32:36 PM by Libloather

Kidnapping, Murder Sweep Nuevo Laredo
Friday, August 05, 2005


NUEVO LAREDO, Mexico — A city official in charge of public security was gunned down along with another man in the downtown area of the embattled city of Nuevo Laredo on Friday.


According to reports, it appeared to be an organized hit involving two cars.


Nuevo Laredo, just cross the border from the United States, has become one of the most dangerous cities in the world. Rival drug cartels have turned the city into a war zone as they battle for control of the lucrative illegal drug market in the U.S.


Gun battles in broad daylight are common, and the U.S. Consulate (search) has shut down, at least temporarily.


The drug gangs have killed the city's last two police chiefs, the second of whom lasted only six hours on the job. Widespread police corruption has compounded the problem. The entire 700-officer force was fired for corruption this summer, though many were hired back.


In addition to the killings, there has been an epidemic of kidnappings. There have been over 400 in the past year, including dozens of Americans.

Pepper
05-30-2008, 12:22 PM
More links!


http://www.**********/mtnews/archives/2007/09/americans_missi.php

http://www.amw.com/missing_persons/brief.cfm?id=30673

http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20050120/news_1n20missing.html

http://missingexploited.com/2006/04/12/us-ambassador-tony-garza-to-pressure-mexico-on-missing-americans/

absinthe
05-30-2008, 12:45 PM
Thank you Pepper! Reading the links now...

Be interesting if there was a connection.

believe09
05-30-2008, 02:00 PM
Maybe we should start a thread with the American kidnappings as well?

It seems clear that the Juarez section of Mexico is someone's hunting ground...either a group or individuals. On a daily basis here at WS we take on cases of missing people who may not have fit the bill as middle class folk, but by golly they have family that love, miss and mourn for them. South of the border we have a whole area where if you are of a certain age range, sex and build, your chances of being murdered horribly are quite good. It reminds me somewhat of Darfur, in that the perpetrators are counting on the apathy of the world to allow them to continue the crimes...

barb0301
05-30-2008, 02:10 PM
This story is about the multiple murders that have been going on in Cuidad Juarez, which is right across the border from El Paso, Texas:


No contemporary human rights crisis in Mexico has moved world public opinion more than the rapes and murders of young women in Ciudad Juarez and the state of Chihuahua. Mass protests stretching from the U.S.-Mexico border to Europe and to India have demanded justice. Even Hollywood took up the theme, when it recently filmed a major drama about the Juarez crimes starring Antonio Banderas, Jennifer Lopez, and Martin Sheen, called "Bordertown." The multi-million dollar film was withheld from release on the big screen in the United States for unexplained reasons.


This story is different, and is about the disappearance of many Americans, and I believe, confirmed killing of a couple, from Nuevo Laredo, which is right across the border from Laredo, Texas:


http://www.amw.com/features/feature_story_detail.cfm?id=293
The Kidnapping Epidemic
But, not only fighting is erupting in the streets of Mexico. Mexico's lawlessness - an outbreak of kidnappings for ransom, brutal gunfights among rival drug cartels and escalating violence - has now crossed the border and touched many American families.

There stories are similar. Americans cross the Mexican-American border from Laredo, Texas to Nuevo Laredo, Mexico to celebrate birthdays, holidays, or to shop or just to enjoy another culture. But, one by one, these Americans failed to return home.

These are 2 different cities in Mexico, but both border towns with big tourist incomes (at least previously). Due to the disappearances in Nuevo Laredo, many college students elected not to cross the border this year during Spring Break. There have been several disappearances of college students in the past.

In Juarez, it is mostly Mexican women that are disappearing and being murdered. There is a HUGE drug problem in Juarez right now, with gangs fighting it out with police. A few months ago, they found several bodies buried at a house in Juarez, suspected to be a drug cartel safe house. It is a REALLY, REALLY dangerous place.

Juarez bodies found: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/14/AR2008031403644.html

Murders of women in Juarez, 204-2007: http://www.wola.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=viewp&id=474&Itemid=2

absinthe
05-30-2008, 02:12 PM
It seems *obvious* that there is more than one person at work. At the least, there is one large group; they may be many groups as well as individual copycat killers.

absinthe
05-30-2008, 02:13 PM
Maybe we should start a thread with the American kidnappings as well?



Good idea, Believe.

absinthe
05-30-2008, 02:20 PM
Ok, since this is such a huge topic stretching over at least 15 years, how would you all like to structure discussion?

there are a few facets in particular that interest me:

1. Connection to maquiladoras (Is there a corporational link? Are maquiladoras being used as hunting grounds for young women? How can we, as Western consumers, influence the international corporations that utilize this cheap labor to make maquiladoras safer?)

2. Modus Operandi of the killers (Right breast severed and left nipple bitten off, kidnapping, stabbing/shooting/asphixiation/strangulation/?, the apparent "holding" of many victims for several days before death)

3. Links to Mexico's elite (police, federales, wealthy young men, government officials, powerful cultists)

absinthe
05-30-2008, 02:22 PM
http://www.websleuths.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4794

Previous (brief) thread on the killings

SewingDeb
05-30-2008, 02:27 PM
This is from May 9th. It was originally online at Courant.com but
he link no longer works (there is fee for older articles) so I copied it from my own post on another forum:

Mexico's Police Chief Killed

Drug Cartels Suspected

MEXICO CITY — - Gunmen assassinated Mexico's national police chief Thursday, blasting him with nine bullets outside his home in the capital and dealing a significant setback to the government's campaign against drug cartels.

Edgar Eusebio Millan Gomez, the public face of Mexico's offensive against drug cartels, became the highest-ranking law enforcement official to be killed since the start of the effort 17 months ago. The assassination could give new confidence to drug cartels blamed for 6,000 killings in the past 2 1/2 years, and embolden other anti-government groups in this violence-plagued nation.

SewingDeb
05-30-2008, 02:29 PM
Drug Cartels to Mexican Police: 'Join Us or Die'

CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico — Drug cartels are sending a brutal message to police and soldiers in cities across Mexico: Join us or die.

The threat appears in recruiting banners hung across roadsides and in publicly posted death lists. Cops get warnings over their two-way radios. At least four high-ranking police officials were gunned down this month, including Mexico's acting federal police chief.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,356532,00.html

blaize
05-30-2008, 02:29 PM
Maquiladoras At A Glance (http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=1528)

Thought I'd post this link for anyone like me who needed to look up what exactly a maquiladora is.

absinthe
05-30-2008, 02:30 PM
SewingDeb, do you think that drug cartels are responsible for raping and killing some/all of the women? That has certainly been theorized before...let me find a link

absinthe
05-30-2008, 02:33 PM
Many of the victims are slim, dark-skinned women in their teens or 20s, workers at the in-body assembly plants known as maquiladoras that produce electrical goods and car parts. They come to the border from poverty-stricken towns farther south, drawn by the promise of steady work and a more exciting life. The plants, famous as examples of unfettered free trade, provide jobs but few amenities to the cities where they are installed.

Some of the women were strangled, some mutilated, some tortured and beaten to death, many after leaving work to return to their shantytown homes.

It's a shocking story, and a stain on the conscience not only of Mexico but also of Canada and the United States. We have embraced Mexico as an economic partner, but are too often indifferent to the social fallout from continental integration.

http://takenbythesky.net/Juarez/nov30_2001.html

This resonates with me as a reason why those of us who live in North America have especial cause to be concerned.

SewingDeb
05-30-2008, 02:34 PM
SewingDeb, do you think that drug cartels are responsible for raping and killing some/all of the women? That has certainly been theorized before...let me find a link

I think it is very possible. The articles make it sound like they run the country.

absinthe
05-30-2008, 02:39 PM
I think it is very possible. The articles make it sound like they run the country.


Do you believe that they are "thrill killing" or murdering the women as a mean of shutting them up (as in, they know too much about the cartel's operations)?

blaize
05-30-2008, 02:42 PM
I wonder how some of these young women are recruited? Do they find the work themselves or through an agency or is it possible that there's a somewhat darker aspect to getting to work in the maquiladoras? Could we be looking at organized crime trafficking in young women for labour and prostitution with the murders and very obvious mutilations being used as a way to coerce good behaviour and payments to 'coyotes'?


Ok, since this is such a huge topic stretching over at least 15 years, how would you all like to structure discussion?

there are a few facets in particular that interest me:

1. Connection to maquiladoras (Is there a corporational link? Are maquiladoras being used as hunting grounds for young women? How can we, as Western consumers, influence the international corporations that utilize this cheap labor to make maquiladoras safer?)

2. Modus Operandi of the killers (Right breast severed and left nipple bitten off, kidnapping, stabbing/shooting/asphixiation/strangulation/?, the apparent "holding" of many victims for several days before death)

3. Links to Mexico's elite (police, federales, wealthy young men, government officials, powerful cultists)

SewingDeb
05-30-2008, 02:43 PM
This is from my link above:

Police who take on the cartels feel isolated and vulnerable when they become targets, as did 22 commanders in the border city of Ciudad Juarez when drug traffickers named them on a handwritten death list left at a monument to fallen police this year. It was addressed to "those who still don't believe" in the power of the cartels.

Of the 22, seven have been killed and three wounded in assassination attempts. Of the others, all but one have quit, and city officials said he didn't want to be interviewed.

"These are attacks directed at the top commanders of the city police, and it is not just happening in Ciudad Juarez," Mayor Jose Reyes Ferriz said at the funeral of the latest victim, police director Juan Antonio Roman Garcia. "It is happening in Nuevo Laredo, in Tijuana, in this entire region," he said. "They are attacking top commanders to destabilize the police force."

-----------

I'm not sure if this is related to the murders or not but it sounds to me like the drug cartels run Ciudad Juarez and Nuevo Laredo where a lot of them happened. Maybe the murders are just to keep people fearful which adds to their power.

SewingDeb
05-30-2008, 02:44 PM
Do you believe that they are "thrill killing" or murdering the women as a mean of shutting them up (as in, they know too much about the cartel's operations)?

Either theory is possible. I think they just run those parts of Mexico and they can get away with anything.

absinthe
05-30-2008, 02:46 PM
I wonder how some of these young women are recruited? Do they find the work themselves or through an agency or is it possible that there's a somewhat darker aspect to getting to work in the maquiladoras? Could we be looking at organized crime trafficking in young women for labour and prostitution with the murders and very obvious mutilations being used as a way to coerce good behaviour and payments to 'coyotes'?


Interesting conjecture!

I admit I don't know much about how the women get to Juarez...certianly, they must be recruited somehow, as I'm sure young poor women from southern villages don't have the means or know-how to get a bus ticket all the way to Juarez. I do know that many of these women came without their families to find work. A young women in a stange city without a support network could certainly be easy pickings.

absinthe
05-30-2008, 02:48 PM
I wish there was a concise list of the murdered women somewhere, so we could categorize how many worked at maquiladoras, how many at dance clubs/bars, brothels, etc...

How many were Juarez natives and how many were transplants.
How many lived with family and how many lived alone.
Hmm...I'm sure there are more things I would like to know...

blaize
05-30-2008, 02:49 PM
I have no doubt that fighting organized crime in Mexico is a hellish & often fatal calling. The thing about the Ciudad Juarez killings though is that someone takes the trouble to dispose of the bodies in a way that means that they're not found for some time. Usually organized crime or gangs kill very publicly to make a public 'in your face' point. Why would they bother concealing the bodies at all if they know they can act with almost 100% impunity?

absinthe
05-30-2008, 02:53 PM
I have no doubt that fighting organized crime in Mexico is a hellish & often fatal calling. The thing about the Ciudad Juarez killings though is that someone takes the trouble to dispose of the bodies in a way that means that they're not found for some time. Usually organized crime or gangs kill very publicly to make a public 'in your face' point. Why would they bother concealing the bodies at all if they know they can act with almost 100% impunity?


IMO, in many cases the bodies are not so much concealed as dumped after the victims were tortured for several days.

Blaize, in regards to your previous post, I know of at least one case where a maimed body was dumped directly in front of the maquiladora where the victim worked.

SewingDeb
05-30-2008, 03:06 PM
I wonder how some of these young women are recruited? Do they find the work themselves or through an agency or is it possible that there's a somewhat darker aspect to getting to work in the maquiladoras? Could we be looking at organized crime trafficking in young women for labour and prostitution with the murders and very obvious mutilations being used as a way to coerce good behaviour and payments to 'coyotes'?

I would bet they find these jobs through agencies which may be involved in human trafficking.

barb0301
05-30-2008, 03:18 PM
I wish there was a concise list of the murdered women somewhere, so we could categorize how many worked at maquiladoras, how many at dance clubs/bars, brothels, etc...

How many were Juarez natives and how many were transplants.
How many lived with family and how many lived alone.
Hmm...I'm sure there are more things I would like to know...

From my post #14, this is probably the most inclusive list you will find right now, it includes victims 2004-2007: http://www.wola.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=viewp&id=474&Itemid=2

absinthe
05-30-2008, 03:20 PM
From my post #14, this is probably the most inclusive list you will find right now, it includes victims 2004-2007: http://www.wola.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=viewp&id=474&Itemid=2


Thank you so much Barb! This is great.

Does anyone speak Spanish?

blaize
05-30-2008, 03:47 PM
Now that's brazen and speaks directly to a commercial & intimidatory motive. 'We can come right into your work place if we want to.'

I wonder what happened directly after that case? Did the maquiladora management get onto LE or complain directly to the local crime gang? If we could find out a bit more about that specific murder and it's aftermath I bet we'd gain a lot more insight into how 'business' is conducted locally.



IMO, in many cases the bodies are not so much concealed as dumped after the victims were tortured for several days.

Blaize, in regards to your previous post, I know of at least one case where a maimed body was dumped directly in front of the maquiladora where the victim worked.

blaize
05-30-2008, 03:49 PM
Yes Deb, I imagine we are looking at a human trafficking situation disguised as a legitimate enterprise.


I would bet they find these jobs through agencies which may be involved in human trafficking.

believe09
05-30-2008, 06:04 PM
Yes Deb, I imagine we are looking at a human trafficking situation disguised as a legitimate enterprise.

This may be a reason for the lack of action-big appetite for this activity on both sides of the border.

Maybe the woman killed are simply the ones who say no?

blaize
05-30-2008, 06:23 PM
That could be too believe. The ones who say no or otherwise stand up for themselves would be expendable & the very graphic mutilation would send a clear message to everyone else.


This may be a reason for the lack of action-big appetite for this activity on both sides of the border.

Maybe the woman killed are simply the ones who say no?

believe09
06-02-2008, 07:44 AM
It is a quick read with a whole lot of good information and opinion. i think that if this thread makes it to a forum or sub forum, there are a few ways to break up the subject into threads...something to consider.

25% of the victims are unidentified-the elephant in the room is how these women laid so long out in the open so that they skelatonized (sp) without being discovered? One of the fields where 8 bodies were discovered together was a frequent "make out" spot for locals.

absinthe
06-02-2008, 11:39 AM
Hopefully, if we generate enough interest, we can make it into a sub-forum!

Believe, is that a full length book? There are a few that I'd like to order. I already wrote you personally about Senorita Extraviada, but I'd like to share with the everybody: http://www.lourdesportillo.com/senoritaextraviada/

It's a really well-done and bone-chilling docu about Juarez. It touches on how globalization ties into the phenomenon, which I find fascinating.

believe09
06-02-2008, 02:57 PM
Hopefully, if we generate enough interest, we can make it into a sub-forum!

Believe, is that a full length book? There are a few that I'd like to order. I already wrote you personally about Senorita Extraviada, but I'd like to share with the everybody: http://www.lourdesportillo.com/senoritaextraviada/

It's a really well-done and bone-chilling docu about Juarez. It touches on how globalization ties into the phenomenon, which I find fascinating.

Full length, friend...pm me your address and I will send it to you...I don't mind sharing-I LOVEED it...

absinthe
06-02-2008, 03:02 PM
Considering that the majority of victims were poor young girls who had no real ties to Juarez, I find it amazing that only 25% are unidentified! Regarding the bodies not being discovered, I think that many of the victims were held and tortured for days (weeks?) before they died. Perhaps some bodies were not dumped until they had begun decomposition? Also, would the desert climate speed things up?

absinthe
06-02-2008, 03:25 PM
Are you suggesting that some people see the bodies and hesitate to report them because of fear/intimidation?

blaize
06-02-2008, 06:30 PM
A lot of people probably are looking the other way because they don't want to become part of the body count.



Are you suggesting that some people see the bodies and hesitate to report them because of fear/intimidation?

porkchop
06-03-2008, 06:01 AM
I believe that some of these murders are part of human sacrifices. There was a case in Juarez a few years back where a drug dealer offering human sacrifices for protection from police and his enemies. :eek:

blaize
06-03-2008, 07:58 AM
Yuck Porkchop but at this stage almost anything seems possible.

Do you have any links about the human sacrificing drug dealer?


I believe that some of these murders are part of human sacrifices. There was a case in Juarez a few years back where a drug dealer offering human sacrifices for protection from police and his enemies. :eek:

believe09
06-03-2008, 09:54 AM
Welcome to WS Porkchop! There is some speculation with the sources that Ted Botha used in the book that people are deterred from dump locations until the bodies are unrecognizable. What struck me was the fact that Amnesty and other human rights groups put the number in excess of 400 women being murdered, but the Mexican govt says more like 100+.

absinthe
06-03-2008, 10:34 AM
I believe that some of these murders are part of human sacrifices. There was a case in Juarez a few years back where a drug dealer offering human sacrifices for protection from police and his enemies. :eek:


Yes! Adolfo de Jesus Constanzo. I intended to bring him up at some point, but I wasn't sure where he would fit in this very loosley structured thread.

absinthe
06-03-2008, 10:37 AM
http://www.geocities.com/quietlyinsane5a/adolfo.html

I believe that Constanzo's American victim, Mark Kilroy, was who Pepper was referring to when she posted about Americans kidnapped in Juarez.

Greywing
06-03-2008, 11:54 AM
Hopefully, if we generate enough interest, we can make it into a sub-forum!

Believe, is that a full length book? There are a few that I'd like to order. I already wrote you personally about Senorita Extraviada, but I'd like to share with the everybody: http://www.lourdesportillo.com/senoritaextraviada/

It's a really well-done and bone-chilling docu about Juarez. It touches on how globalization ties into the phenomenon, which I find fascinating.

I saw this documentary a couple of years ago and it is astounding how little attention these murders receive. There was also a website that focused on the murders of young women in several border towns (geez it's h*&l getting old) years ago ... I think it was affiliated somehow with a militiamen site ... need to look for it.

Greywing
06-03-2008, 12:04 PM
Yes! Adolfo de Jesus Constanzo. I intended to bring him up at some point, but I wasn't sure where he would fit in this very loosley structured thread.

It is important to remember there is a distinction between the "sorcerer" who offered human sacrifice and the murders of these women. When this case was first whispered about there was speculation that the murders were being committed by one or several US born serial killer(s) who found easy hunting across south of the border. I don't think there has been much found in terms of forensic evidence as the bodies were so decomposed prior to discovery ... I really have to see if I can find these older stories!

absinthe
06-03-2008, 12:20 PM
Thank you for joining in, Greywing! Yes, there is a Mexican American serial killer who has been accused of involvement. I will hunt down his name too. I'd like to start a list of the suspects.

absinthe
06-03-2008, 12:22 PM
From my post #14, this is probably the most inclusive list you will find right now, it includes victims 2004-2007: http://www.wola.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=viewp&id=474&Itemid=2


I found another list, with some of the less recent victims!

http://takenbythesky.net/juarez/jindex.html

absinthe
06-03-2008, 12:51 PM
http://dianawashingtonvaldez.blogspot.com/

Diana Washington Valdez's extensive and consistently updated blog. She wrote the book The Killing Fields: Harvest of Women

Greywing
06-03-2008, 01:33 PM
http://zreportage.com/JUAREZ/JUAREZ_Results1.shtml
By 1998, an estimated 187 women had been murdered in Juarez over five years, many mutilated and sexually assaulted, with breasts hacked off, objects thrust up body cavities and deep slashes across chest and face — that is, when decomposition allowed such grisly details to be observed. Juarez criminologist Oscar Maynes, recognized the pattern of serial killing, but he was rebuffed. Many victims were poor, darker-skinned women with Indian features, potentially making the crimes about race and class.

Greywing
06-03-2008, 01:37 PM
http://www.ocregister.com/news/2004/juarez/index.shtml

This is a very good article written in 2004

SewingDeb
06-03-2008, 03:12 PM
I don't know how related this is but thought it should be included. The town has shut down after the threat.

CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico (AFP) - Mexico's northern border town of Juarez, infamous for its history of drug-related violence, has gone into lockdown after an e-mail began circulating warning of an unparalleled "bloodbath" in the coming days.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/afp/080526/world/mexico_crime

absinthe
06-03-2008, 04:07 PM
Thanks, SewingDeb. Wow, scary.

anneinchicago
06-04-2008, 01:19 PM
Just got this out of the library-

The Daughters of Juarez
A True Story of Serial Murder South of The Border

by Teresa Rodriguez

Only a third of the way through, but the details, the indifference and the cover-ups make me sick.

thefragile7393
06-04-2008, 01:33 PM
Glad to see this here, as these killings have been going on for quite some time. And likely, I feel, there's numerous people behind them, not all one person or one group...and all for different reasons, and though some may be the same, I don't feel they are for ALL the same reason...does that make sense? :waitasec: Severe pregnancy brain and nausea are limiting me right now lol. Like all of you here I'd love to research more about these and learn more. It's truely an ugly situation down there...in many border towns, but some are more rough than others.

blaize
06-04-2008, 01:56 PM
Here's a link to an excellent slideshow from the German Stern magazine called City Of Missing Women (http://www.stern.de/politik/ausland/584578.html?nv=ct_rl&backref=%252Fpolitik%252Fausland%252F583650.html%2 53Fnv%253Dsb/)

blaize
06-04-2008, 02:09 PM
Sorry you're feeling a bit under the weather thefragile, hope you feel better soon.

I think there's every possibility that we have an axis of murder and violence here but the one thing that makes it stand out so vividly is that all the victims are female.

Whether there's a single serial killer or a number of them active or if it's organised crime involved in human trafficking, the underlying fact seems loud and clear; women are a disposable resource, chew them up and spit them out and dispose of them like garbage and no one will stop you.


Glad to see this here, as these killings have been going on for quite some time. And likely, I feel, there's numerous people behind them, not all one person or one group...and all for different reasons, and though some may be the same, I don't feel they are for ALL the same reason...does that make sense? :waitasec: Severe pregnancy brain and nausea are limiting me right now lol. Like all of you here I'd love to research more about these and learn more. It's truely an ugly situation down there...in many border towns, but some are more rough than others.

absinthe
06-04-2008, 02:44 PM
That's why I used the word "femicide" in the title, Blaize! I feel like this is more than a serial killer/s, this is a campaign to demonstrate the disposability and worthlessness of women. It's sickening, and every human being should be concerned, especially us vagina havers.

Nice to see you here, anne and fragile!

blaize
06-04-2008, 02:58 PM
Yes, in a culture that reveres the Madonna it's sadly ironic that so many women are treated as disposable commodities.

Whether that's a by-product of poverty or a vicious mix of macho indifference and wilful ignorance remains to be seen but each of those murdered women was somebody's daughter, somebody's sister or cousin or aunt or mother so we should be a voice that shouts for justice for them.


That's why I used the word "femicide" in the title, Blaize! I feel like this is more than a serial killer/s, this is a campaign to demonstrate the disposability and worthlessness of women. It's sickening, and every human being should be concerned, especially us vagina havers.

Nice to see you here, anne and fragile!

absinthe
06-04-2008, 03:04 PM
Yes, in a culture that reveres the Madonna it's sadly ironic that so many women are treated as disposable commodities.

Whether that's a by-product of poverty or a vicious mix of macho indifference and wilful ignorance remains to be seen but each of those murdered women was somebody's daughter, somebody's sister or cousin or aunt or mother so we should be a voice that shouts for justice for them.

The reverence of La Virgen de Guadalupe might actually have something to do with it, blaize! I sometimes think (and this is my opinion alone) that sometimes in societies where there is a strong cult of the Virgin Mary, there is also a pervasive Madonna/whore mindset regarding women.

thefragile7393
06-04-2008, 03:13 PM
Whether there's a single serial killer or a number of them active or if it's organised crime involved in human trafficking, the underlying fact seems loud and clear; women are a disposable resource, chew them up and spit them out and dispose of them like garbage and no one will stop you.
I think you've hit the nail on the head...and quite possibly one of the many reasons why these keep going on. I wish that article was in English, but the pictures are moving enough.

blaize
06-04-2008, 03:55 PM
The Madonna/Whore paradigm is part of the cultural mindset and background to all of this but at the same time if someone with enough authority to enforce it doesn't say stop, the murders, violence and abuse will just continue unabated.


The reverence of La Virgen de Guadalupe might actually have something to do with it, blaize! I sometimes think (and this is my opinion alone) that sometimes in societies where there is a strong cult of the Virgin Mary, there is also a pervasive Madonna/whore mindset regarding women.

absinthe
06-04-2008, 03:57 PM
The Madonna/Whore paradigm is part of the cultural mindset and background to all of this but at the same time if someone with enough authority to enforce it doesn't say stop the murders, violence and abuse will just continue unabated.

Again, just seems to show that those in authority are complicit!

We really need to start a suspect list...start looking at different scenarios...

blaize
06-04-2008, 03:58 PM
Those images are moving aren't they? They help put a very human and suffering face on these tragic events.


I think you've hit the nail on the head...and quite possibly one of the many reasons why these keep going on. I wish that article was in English, but the pictures are moving enough.

blaize
06-04-2008, 04:03 PM
Are there specific names available or are people too afraid to point the finger?

I'd be very concerned that we do this correctly so that we don't endanger any whistle blowers by posting bread crumbs that could be followed to any vulnerable person.



Again, just seems to show that those in authority are complicit!

We really need to start a suspect list...start looking at different scenarios...

absinthe
06-04-2008, 04:05 PM
Are there specific names available or are people too afraid to point the finger?

I'd be very concerned that we do this correctly so that we don't endanger any whistle blowers by posting bread crumbs that could be followed to any vulnerable person.


Let's see..there are 2 possible ways to do this. One would be to use theories (i.e., the young sons of the elite are responsible, drug cartels, cults, organ harvesters, etc.) and the other would be to use actual names of individuals (which would be more difficult, IMO).

blaize
06-04-2008, 04:51 PM
Yes the safest way for now is to follow theories and see where they lead us.


Let's see..there are 2 possible ways to do this. One would be to use theories (i.e., the young sons of the elite are responsible, drug cartels, cults, organ harvesters, etc.) and the other would be to use actual names of individuals (which would be more difficult, IMO).

mywarmbluefleece
06-04-2008, 10:19 PM
Either theory is possible. I think they just run those parts of Mexico and they can get away with anything.


We actually had an FBI agent come to the school I was student teaching to give a talk about the signs of drug use. He said the slayings in Ciudad Juarez had to do with drug debts and gangs and they harm other family members instead of the person who breaks whatever street gang rule they have.

anneinchicago
06-05-2008, 10:54 AM
Don't know if this has already been posted somewhere, but here are some hopefully useful links.

Interestingly enough, most of these sites also use the word femicide.

And if all these dead women were, instead, dead men, the world would be up in arms.

Amigos de Mujeres
http://www.amigosdemujeres.org/

Amnesty International
http://www.amnestyusa.org/violence-against-women/justice-for-the-women-of-juarez-and-chihuahua/page.do?id=1108394&n1=3&n2=39&n3=732

NOW
http://www.now.org/issues/global/juarez/

and

LibertadLatina.org (some cases notes here)
http://www.libertadlatina.org/Crisis_Lat_Mexico_Juarez_Femicide.htm

casa amiga crisis center
http://www.casa-amiga.org/Presentation.html

justicia para nuestras hijas (spanish only, i think)
http://www.geocities.com/jpnh123/

mujeres de negro (spanish only)
http://www.mujeresdenegro.org/

and an article on the women in black
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/cgpc/2005/00000012/00000003/art00001;jsessionid=6i17ch2nli1tc.alice?format=pri nt

mujeres por juarez

petition to endthe violence
http://www.petitiononline.com/JUAREZ/petition.html

The Juarez Project
http://thejuarezproject.com/

Washington Office on Latin America
http://www.wola.org/index.php?&option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=6&Itemid=&topic=Violence+Against+Women⊂=1&content_topic=Juarez+Murders (http://www.wola.org/index.php?&option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=6&Itemid=&topic=Violence+Against+Women&sub=1&content_topic=Juarez+Murders)

SewingDeb
06-05-2008, 10:57 AM
You're welcome Absinthe. I wouldn't want to live there.

thefragile7393
06-05-2008, 04:53 PM
We actually had an FBI agent come to the school I was student teaching to give a talk about the signs of drug use. He said the slayings in Ciudad Juarez had to do with drug debts and gangs and they harm other family members instead of the person who breaks whatever street gang rule they have.
I truely believe that's part of it....maybe a good part of it. But not all of it, not by a long shot.

absinthe
06-09-2008, 02:09 PM
Don't know if this has already been posted somewhere, but here are some hopefully useful links.

Interestingly enough, most of these sites also use the word femicide.

And if all these dead women were, instead, dead men, the world would be up in arms.

Amigos de Mujeres
http://www.amigosdemujeres.org/

Amnesty International
http://www.amnestyusa.org/violence-against-women/justice-for-the-women-of-juarez-and-chihuahua/page.do?id=1108394&n1=3&n2=39&n3=732

NOW
http://www.now.org/issues/global/juarez/

and

LibertadLatina.org (some cases notes here)
http://www.libertadlatina.org/Crisis_Lat_Mexico_Juarez_Femicide.htm

casa amiga crisis center
http://www.casa-amiga.org/Presentation.html

justicia para nuestras hijas (spanish only, i think)
http://www.geocities.com/jpnh123/

mujeres de negro (spanish only)
http://www.mujeresdenegro.org/

and an article on the women in black
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/cgpc/2005/00000012/00000003/art00001;jsessionid=6i17ch2nli1tc.alice?format=pri nt

mujeres por juarez

petition to endthe violence
http://www.petitiononline.com/JUAREZ/petition.html

The Juarez Project
http://thejuarezproject.com/

Washington Office on Latin America
http://www.wola.org/index.php?&option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=6&Itemid=&topic=Violence+Against+Women⊂=1&content_topic=Juarez+Murders


Just saw this Anne! Thank you so much! Going through the links now, should be lots of fodder for discussion.

blaize
06-09-2008, 02:25 PM
City Of Dead Girls (http://www.booserver.com/projects.php?ProjectID=2721)

They call Ciudad Juarez “the serial killers’ playground”. In the past decade, over 500 women have been murdered. Most were abducted, raped and tortured before they were killed. So many women have died that a new word has been invented to describe what is happening here – ‘femicidios’, the murder of women. But despite the international outcry, the killings have continued. There are even claims the police are protecting the girls’ murderers. What has made Ciudad Juarez so dangerous for women? This documentary investigates.

The city of Ciudad Juarez is littered with pink crosses. They come in all shapes and sizes, scrawled on walls and electricity pylons, in petrol stations and bus stops. Every so often, you come across a tatty ‘Missing’ poster, pleading for information about another vanished girl. But the residents pay them scant attention. After so many killings, they’re immune to the sight.“She was 17 years old. She had all the hopes of youth. And someone came and cut her dreams short,” laments Benita Morares, mourning her murdered daughter. Maria Sagrario was also 17 when she was raped and murdered. One of her breasts was cut off and her ovaries removed. “These people have no conscience. They are not human,” states her mother.The authorities pinned the murders on two poor bus drivers, Victor Garcia Uribe and his friend, ‘Seal’. But they have always maintained their innocence. From his prison cell in Juarez, Uribe describes what happened. Police dragged him from his car, threatened to kill his family and drove him to a private house, where he was tortured. “They told me to say I had killed the women. They started putting out cigarettes on my penis and giving me electric shocks.” Then reports emerged that the police coroner, Castro Valles, resigned after being asked to plant fabricated evidence. “The order to fabricate evidence was delivered orally. That’s why nothing can be proved”, he states. The prison doctor confirmed both men had been severely tortured and reporters began looking for the house. They traced it to a property owned by the police commissioner.With pressure growing, the government sent two officials to Ciudad Juarez to examine the police investigation. “We found 81 infractions committed by state officials”, recalls prosecutor Maria Lopez Urbina. “On one occasion, an employee lit a fire to warm himself using case files for tinder.” So many mistakes have been made and so much evidence destroyed that people believe the police are protecting the real killers.“It’s not that the police can’t solve this problem. It’s that they don’t want to”, claims one victim’s mother. Ciudad Juarez is home to the world’s second largest drugs cartel. “In this city, most respectable citizens with economic power are involved in the drugs trade”, states Norma Andrade. Lawyer Dante Almaraz agrees. “The local government is up to the neck in commitments to the drug barons. And the federal government has agreed to give them a wide berth, even in these circumstances.” The police of Juarez are known to have worked as hired killers for the cartels before. As the government’s own investigator asked: “Can we really expect that these people will actually investigate the cases?”

absinthe
06-09-2008, 02:43 PM
Thanks blaize.

I'm thinking I should email some of these groups to see what kind of resources they can provide us with?

believe09
06-09-2008, 07:49 PM
City Of Dead Girls (http://www.booserver.com/projects.php?ProjectID=2721)

They call Ciudad Juarez “the serial killers’ playground”. In the past decade, over 500 women have been murdered. Most were abducted, raped and tortured before they were killed. So many women have died that a new word has been invented to describe what is happening here – ‘femicidios’, the murder of women. But despite the international outcry, the killings have continued. There are even claims the police are protecting the girls’ murderers. What has made Ciudad Juarez so dangerous for women? This documentary investigates.

The city of Ciudad Juarez is littered with pink crosses. They come in all shapes and sizes, scrawled on walls and electricity pylons, in petrol stations and bus stops. Every so often, you come across a tatty ‘Missing’ poster, pleading for information about another vanished girl. But the residents pay them scant attention. After so many killings, they’re immune to the sight.“She was 17 years old. She had all the hopes of youth. And someone came and cut her dreams short,” laments Benita Morares, mourning her murdered daughter. Maria Sagrario was also 17 when she was raped and murdered. One of her breasts was cut off and her ovaries removed. “These people have no conscience. They are not human,” states her mother.The authorities pinned the murders on two poor bus drivers, Victor Garcia Uribe and his friend, ‘Seal’. But they have always maintained their innocence. From his prison cell in Juarez, Uribe describes what happened. Police dragged him from his car, threatened to kill his family and drove him to a private house, where he was tortured. “They told me to say I had killed the women. They started putting out cigarettes on my penis and giving me electric shocks.” Then reports emerged that the police coroner, Castro Valles, resigned after being asked to plant fabricated evidence. “The order to fabricate evidence was delivered orally. That’s why nothing can be proved”, he states. The prison doctor confirmed both men had been severely tortured and reporters began looking for the house. They traced it to a property owned by the police commissioner.With pressure growing, the government sent two officials to Ciudad Juarez to examine the police investigation. “We found 81 infractions committed by state officials”, recalls prosecutor Maria Lopez Urbina. “On one occasion, an employee lit a fire to warm himself using case files for tinder.” So many mistakes have been made and so much evidence destroyed that people believe the police are protecting the real killers.“It’s not that the police can’t solve this problem. It’s that they don’t want to”, claims one victim’s mother. Ciudad Juarez is home to the world’s second largest drugs cartel. “In this city, most respectable citizens with economic power are involved in the drugs trade”, states Norma Andrade. Lawyer Dante Almaraz agrees. “The local government is up to the neck in commitments to the drug barons. And the federal government has agreed to give them a wide berth, even in these circumstances.” The police of Juarez are known to have worked as hired killers for the cartels before. As the government’s own investigator asked: “Can we really expect that these people will actually investigate the cases?”

When Absinthe and I first talked about this case, or the cases depending on your perspective, the first thing that struck me was the amount of hopelessness the investigation is mired in. The idea that the crimes are one big Juggernaut unable to be stopped, and that women will continue to be swallowed up and spit out in pieces until there are none left to "feed the beast." The people of the city sometimes will not id their own loved ones-they do not want to draw attention to themselves in any way, and it is clear to me that there is no appetite for solving any of the cases. There seems to be deliberate mishandling of whatever evidence exists.

I remember the old argument when it comes to criminalizing prostitution (you know that "victimeless" crime)- Why should we assign a group of women the responsibility of handling the aberrant sexual appetites of the minority? This argument holds true for Juarez-why should this slaughter be allowed to continue under our very noses, in an area that is financed in large part by the corporations from the US who have moved plant operations out of the states? It boggles my mind....

blaize
06-10-2008, 12:41 PM
That part really does stand out, that the LE agencies involved seem almost not to care as long as they give lip service to the party line that they've caught some of the perpetrators.

It's desperately sad that some of the women lie unclaimed because their families are terrified of retaliation.


When Absinthe and I first talked about this case, or the cases depending on your perspective, the first thing that struck me was the amount of hopelessness the investigation is mired in. The idea that the crimes are one big Juggernaut unable to be stopped, and that women will continue to be swallowed up and spit out in pieces until there are none left to "feed the beast." The people of the city sometimes will not id their own loved ones-they do not want to draw attention to themselves in any way, and it is clear to me that there is no appetite for solving any of the cases. There seems to be deliberate mishandling of whatever evidence exists.

I remember the old argument when it comes to criminalizing prostitution (you know that "victimeless" crime)- Why should we assign a group of women the responsibility of handling the aberrant sexual appetites of the minority? This argument holds true for Juarez-why should this slaughter be allowed to continue under our very noses, in an area that is financed in large part by the corporations from the US who have moved plant operations out of the states? It boggles my mind....

absinthe
06-10-2008, 05:05 PM
Note, head found near Mexican newspaper
(http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/M/MEXICO_REPORTER_THREATENED?SITE=CADIU&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT#)
VILLAHERMOSA, Mexico (AP) -- A note threatening a Mexican journalist was found outside the office of a newspaper in southern Mexico on Monday, two days after someone left a severed head there.
Tabasco state Attorney General Gustavo Rosario said the letter was directed at Juan Padilla, editor of El Correo de Tabasco, which recently carried reports about migrant smuggling and kidnapping in the area.
"You are next," the note read.
The head of a man police identified as a low-level drug trafficker was found outside the offices on Saturday. Soldiers later located his body in another part of the city alongside a separate note that said, "This is what will happen to those who go around pointing fingers."

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/M/MEXICO_REPORTER_THREATENED?SITE=CADIU&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

blaize
06-10-2008, 05:46 PM
Very charming ... not. In any other country that would be like a slap in the face to the local LE, but apparently not in this case.



Note, head found near Mexican newspaper

VILLAHERMOSA, Mexico (AP) -- A note threatening a Mexican journalist was found outside the office of a newspaper in southern Mexico on Monday, two days after someone left a severed head there.
Tabasco state Attorney General Gustavo Rosario said the letter was directed at Juan Padilla, editor of El Correo de Tabasco, which recently carried reports about migrant smuggling and kidnapping in the area.
"You are next," the note read.
The head of a man police identified as a low-level drug trafficker was found outside the offices on Saturday. Soldiers later located his body in another part of the city alongside a separate note that said, "This is what will happen to those who go around pointing fingers."

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/M/MEXICO_REPORTER_THREATENED?SITE=CADIU&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

absinthe
06-14-2008, 05:00 PM
http://www.booserver.com/projects.php?ProjectID=2721

Link to full length film The City of Dead Girls, documentary on Juarez by Greek (:)) filmmakers.

gaia227
06-20-2008, 09:28 AM
http://www.vday.org/static/download/juarez_mc0304.pdf


Eve Ensler's website has a link to an article in Marie Claire which provides an in-depth look at the situation in Juarez. Interesting and informative read.

thefragile7393
06-20-2008, 06:53 PM
Absolutely fascinating. And it really goes into one of the many reasons why these killings continue....the policia themselves. It also seems to confirm my own opinion that there's different people doing these for different reasons...though I don't buy the organ theory much.

Derek
08-20-2011, 10:05 PM
http://www.vday.org/static/download/juarez_mc0304.pdf


Eve Ensler's website has a link to an article in Marie Claire which provides an in-depth look at the situation in Juarez. Interesting and informative read.

Interesting read, thank you.

After reading The Killing Fields: Harvest Of Women, it is clear as to who is behind the Juarez, Mexico femicide. I'm not sure how many of you have read the book by Diana Washington Valdez, who's blog is mentioned in this topic. I'll sum it up short.


It all started with a pact that was held at the home of a Chihuahua state politician. In paticular, a former Mexican president, a general, a high-ranking police official, several federal judges, a bishop and several Colombian man.

The purpose of this meeting was to tell that Chihuahua, Mexico had been sold to the Colombian drug cartels. A list was passed around that had the names of people who law enforcement could not interfere with. The list included drug traffickers, powerful families and powerful men who were implicated in the Juarez Femicides.

Regarding the Juarez Femicides, the murders were mainly committed by serial killers, gangs, drug dealers, a group of powerful young men named the "Juniors" and copycats. As of 2006, none are in custody and are probably still alive. The many well-known suspects that confessed to the crimes were all innocent and had nothing to do with the killings.

At least two of the still-missing women as of 2006 were apparently sold into sex trafficking. A computer school chain which at the time was called "ECCO" was involved in several of the cases.

Many of the murdered women were at a store when they were approached by young people asking for personal information for the ECCO school. Somehow the girls are contacted and directed to a restaurant. Once inside they are tied up and taken by a member of the Juarez Drug Cartel. Other murdered women either attended the ECCO computer school or where approached by representives before their disappearences.

The cases spread to Chihuahua City, the capital of the state of Chihuahua in 1999. That was the same year that the Juarez Drug Cartel moved to the city in order to arouse less suspicion by American Law Enforcement.

Oh and as of around 2004, the killers are now dismembering the girls after killing them and feeding their remains to hogs. This is just like Robert Pickton did.


The book was done in 2006. Since 2008, many more women disappear in Ciudad Juarez and Chihuahua City each year than usual. Many believe that these new dissappearences are mainly committed by sex traffickers. The MO of abduction is the same as the original serial killings because they were abducted from the downtown section of Ciudad Juarez.


Despite the fact the Mexican Drug War that has torn Chihuahua state apart is a much more pressing issue then the previous femicides, action must still be taken. People with cruical information could be assissinated by the drug gangs at any time.

There is more information to be told from that book and also regarding a fugitive wanted out of Chicago who I have been investigating his possible involvement in these crimes for two years now. None of the information I've determined has been publicly confirmed by any law enforcement agency, however it's also an interesting read.


Oh one more thing for now. No one has ever determined what happened to escaped serial killer Pedro Padilla Flores. Flores sexually murdered (raped and murdered) two women and a 13-year old girl in 1986 down in Ciudad Juarez. He was captured but escaped from a Chihuahua Rehabilitation Center in 1991. Regarding some of the 1990's homicides, one could deduct that Flores committed some of those.

mysteriew
04-16-2012, 09:04 PM
Serial killer? Drug War? 12 women's corpses found in Mexico border town

Authorities found the stashed bodies in January and February


Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/serial-killer-drug-war-12-women-corpses-found-mexico-border-town-article-1.1062546#ixzz1sFt8HJRJ

Chihuahua

Derek
04-29-2012, 08:52 PM
http://fiscalia.chihuahua.gob.mx/pdf/reporte/informeznorte.pdf

Listing Of missing women/girls out of Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua.

Derek
05-06-2012, 07:01 PM
http://www.elpasotimes.com/news/ci_20558432/discovery-puts-slayings-women-spotlight

JUAREZ -- There was not a single day in two and a half years when Elvira González didn't ask God to find her daughter Perla Ivonne Aguirre alive.
Now, González prays for the ability to accept what happened to her daughter and move on.
The skeletal remains of Perla Ivonne were found earlier this year in the Valley of Juárez, along with those of 11 other young women, in what appears to be the latest -- and largest -- dumping ground for slain women in the region.
Two weeks ago, González received the remains of her daughter, who went missing on July 21, 2009, at age 15. González buried Perla Ivonne with all the stuffed animals the girl had collected.
"There are mothers that are being consumed, that are sick

Continued in link provided.

mysteriew
05-09-2012, 04:36 PM
While this article doesn't mention the murders, I would guess that it is an added complication.

Mexican Crime Reporters Risk Becoming The Story

According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, more than 45 journalists have been killed or disappeared in Mexico since 2006. Some press advocacy organizations put the number much higher. They are among the many victims in an organized crime free-for-all that has killed more than 50,000 Mexicans in that time period.
http://www.npr.org/2012/05/09/152337896/mexican-crime-reporters-risk-becoming-the-story