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housemouse
02-28-2009, 11:29 PM
SURVIVALIST Tips associated with Home and Gardening
Practical ways to be a handy dandy survivalist in these trying times.

A word from our HOUSEMOUSE:
What I hope to do on this thread is put up the better times to take care of our homes and gardens.

We all know that the Moon travels through all the signs in about one month, and the Bible tells us that there is a time for everything under heaven. So, we can get in touch with the lunar rhythm, and take advantage of the best times to do things.



I took comfort from something Housemouse said about being prepared. It never hurts to have extra food and water on hand for whatever reason. Power outages happen anywhere and everywhere. Mail and paychecks could be delayed. It's comforting, to me, to know future POSSIBILITIES through our Astrologer's and to be ready as best I can. I pray for the best, but try to be prepared for less than perfect conditions.
Don't think of them as gun nuts - see them as descendants of the same people who helped draft our constitution and make it a reality.

Angelzgram, you are so right on being prepared giving one a sense of security and calm. Remember the parable about the 7 wise virgins, who were ready with their lamps filled with oil and the 7 foolish ones, who were not ready?

I am not afraid, but I am concerned for the well-being of those who will be caught unprepared. For that reason, it probably isn't wise to tell anyone except your trusted family members that you have been making preparations.

But, always be ready to share, if the need is there. For that reason, put aside some extra, for you never know when there will be hungry children in your neighborhood. And, it could be a power outage, a tornado, hurricane, earthquake, or some unforeseen disruption in the normal supply chain to your part of the country.

housemouse
03-02-2009, 05:23 PM
My husband's grandparents were "poor" during the great Depression, and had only a small railroad pension to rely on. But, Granpa had a veggie garden in the back yard, and they had only a wood cookstove for heat. One bathroom in a three bedroom house.

At one point, they had 14 family members living there, their children and grandchildren. They managed. My husband's mother, a wonderful person, had only one dress to wear to high school, but she was one of the most popular girls in her class.

We all can do it. Churches might well become the center of bartering services, sharing food, and organizing neighbors to help neighbors. Find one close to you, and get a food pantry started, if they do not have one yet.

Invisible
03-02-2009, 06:44 PM
I have read about these poor souls, too, CourtsInSession, and feel so sad. There is no shame in being what my paternal grandmother referred to as "reduced circumstances".

Think about it, that is all it is. It says nothing about one's worth in the eyes of God. People get so wrapped up in material possessions that they get lost.

I hope not one person reading here will lose faith, lose hope. If this is happening, perhaps it is time to go to your local pastor, priest, or family counselor, and get some help.

One of the favorite books of the bible that helped me carry on when my oldest child died, and one that might give some comfort is the Book of Job. He suffered mightily, and although he eventually questioned God, he received an answer

And, if that doesn't do it, think of our ancestors, many of whom risked all to get to this country. They were not afraid of hardship, and had faith in God and themselves to rebuild a better life.

We need not be afraid. We need to be creative, wise, prepared, and confident. Instead of worrying, start planning.

This is my favorite WS post of all time. Thank you, Housemouse.

Old Bird
03-02-2009, 08:23 PM
I have read about these poor souls, too, CourtsInSession, and feel so sad. There is no shame in being what my paternal grandmother referred to as "reduced circumstances".

Think about it, that is all it is. It says nothing about one's worth in the eyes of God. People get so wrapped up in material possessions that they get lost.

I hope not one person reading here will lose faith, lose hope. If this is happening, perhaps it is time to go to your local pastor, priest, or family counselor, and get some help.

One of the favorite books of the bible that helped me carry on when my oldest child died, and one that might give some comfort is the Book of Job. He suffered mightily, and although he eventually questioned God, he received an answer

And, if that doesn't do it, think of our ancestors, many of whom risked all to get to this country. They were not afraid of hardship, and had faith in God and themselves to rebuild a better life.

We need not be afraid. We need to be creative, wise, prepared, and confident. Instead of worrying, start planning.


Thanks, housemouse & others, for the wonderful reminder that when God is all we've got, we find out He's all we need! Yes, start planning! Start planting our gardens! Fill our lamps! Pray!

housemouse, I appreciate your input & guidance on this thread. Thank you!!!

V/R, OB

housemouse
03-02-2009, 08:43 PM
I get so excited at this time of year, trying to figure out what to plant, and where. We have quite a bit of land that we could use for gardening, but with our handicaps, we can't do the physical work of a very large garden.

Instead, I have a few raised beds, some pots, and some borders around our little house. We can grow more than we eat in not that much space.

To relate this to astrology, I do use it to start my seeds for the veggie garden. Tomatoes are always started a couple of days before the new Moon that falls about 6 weeks before our last frost date. This is because they will sprout the fastest at this time.

Seeds that take 14 days or so to sprout get started at the full Moon, so they will sprout right on time at the new Moon. I use the moons for the eventual transplant out to their permanent spot also.

CourtsInSession
03-04-2009, 05:00 PM
Thank you Housemouse, Fifth E. and all you dear, caring people here who are trying to ease my fears. What a wonderful group of people! I just do not do well with change in my life. I am terrified by the future because I have no idea how much of anything I need to stockpile or for how long. I am going to send for the survival book to try and find out what I need to do. Regardless, the unknown just puts me in total chaos. I don't even know what to buy beside canned goods. Do you buy freeze dried or dehydrated? Do you buy wheat or flour? This is all too much for me to try and figure out and prepare for. I am trying, but it is so difficult and overwhelming for me. My being terrified is not really so much about money, it's the future, preparing and helping my family survive what's ahead.

butterfly1978
03-04-2009, 05:26 PM
Thank you Housemouse, Fifth E. and all you dear, caring people here who are trying to ease my fears. What a wonderful group of people! I just do not do well with change in my life. I am terrified by the future because I have no idea how much of anything I need to stockpile or for how long. I am going to send for the survival book to try and find out what I need to do. Regardless, the unknown just puts me in total chaos. I don't even know what to buy beside canned goods. Do you buy freeze dried or dehydrated? Do you buy wheat or flour? This is all too much for me to try and figure out and prepare for. I am trying, but it is so difficult and overwhelming for me. My being terrified is not really so much about money, it's the future, preparing and helping my family survive what's ahead.

I totally understand. Its the fear of the unknown. Its not so much a fear of something happening its a fear of not knowing what will happen and knowing if you have prepared accordingly and prepared enough to keep your family safe. Personally I do not care what will happen because I feel that we can work through anything. My worry comes from not knowing and not being able to prepare for things you dont know. I mean yes you can buy food and stock up but how much do you need. Do we need to be tring to find ways to purify water? Learn about edible plants? Plants and things that can be used for medications? Do I need to learn to make clothes???? its those type things that worry me.

housemouse
03-04-2009, 07:45 PM
Thank you Housemouse, Fifth E. and all you dear, caring people here who are trying to ease my fears. What a wonderful group of people! I just do not do well with change in my life. I am terrified by the future because I have no idea how much of anything I need to stockpile or for how long. I am going to send for the survival book to try and find out what I need to do. Regardless, the unknown just puts me in total chaos. I don't even know what to buy beside canned goods. Do you buy freeze dried or dehydrated? Do you buy wheat or flour? This is all too much for me to try and figure out and prepare for. I am trying, but it is so difficult and overwhelming for me. My being terrified is not really so much about money, it's the future, preparing and helping my family survive what's ahead.

CourtsInSession, try this approach, for it might help.

The best way to get over a fear of change is to take control of the change, plan it out, then gradually work your plan. This way, you are in charge.

First, take a hard-eagled look at your monthly spending. Make a list of those things that you do not really need to spend money on, and take that money and set it aside. Pay off all the credit cards, etc. and accumulate some savings.

Look at how much money you spend on food, eating out, etc. Stop eating out, and save that money for storing food.

Make a list of foods you like to eat that store well. Try to think of a reasonably balanced diet, so pick the grains you like to eat, then pick the proteins you like, then choose the most nutritious veggies you like.

Take the "eating out" money you save, and start buying foods that store well, figuring out meals to make with them. Get creative with this, and make it fun.

You can buy freeze-dried or dehydrated foods, but you are wiser to not buy the "one-year" deals, for these may include foods that you and your loved ones won't like or enjoy. It is better to make a list of food that you really like, and figure out how much to buy, using the lists as a guide.

Look for a good friendly forum for preparing, then read, post asking questions, and think for yourself. If you take control, you will feel much more secure.

Also, get your family involved, if they will listen. Many family members won't, as they do not want to think about such things. If they aren't supportive, be understanding, for it is probably just too frightening to them to consider any other way of life. Just drop it, and keep on doing your own thing, gradually increasing your supply of toilet paper, etc... make a joke of it, and they might come around faster.

Angelzgram
03-04-2009, 08:04 PM
I totally understand. Its the fear of the unknown. Its not so much a fear of something happening its a fear of not knowing what will happen and knowing if you have prepared accordingly and prepared enough to keep your family safe. Personally I do not care what will happen because I feel that we can work through anything. My worry comes from not knowing and not being able to prepare for things you dont know. I mean yes you can buy food and stock up but how much do you need. Do we need to be tring to find ways to purify water? Learn about edible plants? Plants and things that can be used for medications? Do I need to learn to make clothes???? its those type things that worry me.

Yes, a person could bankrupt themselves trying to buy things in order to be prepared. Why not use this as an opportunity to make this a fun and educational thing for your children and yourself. A trip to the library to choose some books about easy to grow herbs, fruits and vegetables can be a great way to interact with your kids. And the more you do with your children, the more open they are to your viewpoints. Even by yourself, it's good for your mind to learn new things.
Maybe someone at your church, or a neighbor has a garden and could take you under their wing. I hear chickens aren't too difficult to raise, if you don't have a lot of them. Also, there are free publications available through your county about emergency preparedness, and they tell you how to purify water in an emergency. You can go to READY.GOV for excellent preparedness info.

HOUSEMOUSE can you post more info on gardening with astrology?
tyia

housemouse
03-04-2009, 08:23 PM
HOUSEMOUSE can you post more info on gardening with astrology?
tyia

I certainly can! I use it all the time when planting my seeds, transplanting my seedlings, etc... but wonder if it belongs on a different thread?

I am in zone 5, so what works for me will be a bit different in other zones, but the principles still stand.

You use the new moon to plant seeds that will sprout in 7 days or so. The full moon for those that need 14 days, and the new moon again for those that need 21 days or longer.

Try to transplant out when the moon is full. Maybe I could use the "mundane astrology" thread for this and other things related to every day life? (like when to get a good haircut)

FifthEssence? Where should we put it?

CourtsInSession
03-05-2009, 01:53 AM
Yes, a person could bankrupt themselves trying to buy things in order to be prepared. Why not use this as an opportunity to make this a fun and educational thing for your children and yourself. A trip to the library to choose some books about easy to grow herbs, fruits and vegetables can be a great way to interact with your kids. And the more you do with your children, the more open they are to your viewpoints. Even by yourself, it's good for your mind to learn new things.
Maybe someone at your church, or a neighbor has a garden and could take you under their wing. I hear chickens aren't too difficult to raise, if you don't have a lot of them. Also, there are free publications available through your county about emergency preparedness, and they tell you how to purify water in an emergency. You can go to READY.GOV for excellent preparedness info.

HOUSEMOUSE can you post more info on gardening with astrology?
tyia

Unfortunately Housemouse I am not a take charge type of person. Right off the bat growing or raising food is out of the question. We live right in town with tiny yards. If one were to try and plant in containers, it would be stolen. City ordnances prevent you from raising chickens, cows or pigs. Basically all I can do is buy food that has a long shelf life. Believe me if I could take control, I would. I can't even begin to figure out how much to store not having any idea for how long I need to store it. I already have money set aside, a coleman stove and fuel, propane tanks for grill, bottled water, oil and lanterns, a generator and gasoline, tons of batteries, radio. My husband and son are right in on this with me but we have NO clue how much we need to store food wise. I have been making gallons of soup and freezing it, but now I wonder if it should have been canned instead. This is just way above what I can deal with not knowing if I'm to store food for a year, two years, or eternity.

housemouse
03-05-2009, 03:34 AM
Unfortunately Housemouse I am not a take charge type of person. Right off the bat growing or raising food is out of the question. We live right in town with tiny yards. If one were to try and plant in containers, it would be stolen. City ordnances prevent you from raising chickens, cows or pigs. Basically all I can do is buy food that has a long shelf life. Believe me if I could take control, I would. I can't even begin to figure out how much to store not having any idea for how long I need to store it. I already have money set aside, a coleman stove and fuel, propane tanks for grill, bottled water, oil and lanterns, a generator and gasoline, tons of batteries, radio. My husband and son are right in on this with me but we have NO clue how much we need to store food wise. I have been making gallons of soup and freezing it, but now I wonder if it should have been canned instead. This is just way above what I can deal with not knowing if I'm to store food for a year, two years, or eternity.

CourtsInSession, you have taken the first step by defining your circumstances. You have very little space for growing food, but you can enjoy a few pots, hopefully sheltered from sticky-fingered neighbors.

So, storing up dehydrated food will give you some comfort. And, there is lots at your local supermarket. And, none of us know how much we need to store, or for how many!

I have three grown children, and none of them want to think about what we worry about. Like Starbucks will always be there, right? I am serious here! My sister's grown children came to visit last summer, and drove 30 minutes one way to get their Starbuck's fix, and then home again.

Can someone explain that to me?

All I can advise you to do is to make up a list of weekly meals that everyone will eat without weeping into their plate. Once you have that, stock up on the foods you need.

You are way ahead of most people, because you have a way of cooking, a generator, batteries, etc. And, most importantly, your husband and your son are on the same page! Let them help you with the food lists, as this kind of planning can bring a family together.

Seriously, CourtsInSession, start with one week of meals and water stored. Then try to figure out from one week what you might store for a month. Think of it as building blocks. Getting the rest of the family involved will help, particularly if you make it fun!

Plan a "disaster" weekend. Pretend that all utilities are no available. Break out the candles, and turn off the electric. Learn what our grandmother had to deal with, and cook early, so the dishes are done before it gets dark. (We learned this when our power went out two summers ago, not fun trying to do dishes in the dark!) Get the guys involved in a "test-run".

You will find out what our grand-parents, and great-grands considered normal. Most importantly, you will feel in control, the mistress of your home, and ready for whatever comes your way.

Water for flushing the toilet is probably the biggest thing most people forget, actually. Start saving containers of water just for flushing, and corn-cobs for wiping. (that is a joke!)

CourtsInSession
03-05-2009, 05:14 AM
I fully understand what others are saying that God will provide. I also understand that I have been taught since I was a little girl that God helps those who help themselves.

With the price of gas last summer, your nieces little road trip added up to an expensive coffee at Starbuck's. Sometimes you just have to find excuses and do crazy things to keep your sanity.

I was going to can meat and vegetables, but I don't know as I feel too safe with canning meat. I know all of you have helped calm me somewhat now that I know I am somewhat on the right track. I also have a bread maker and a vacuum sealer and bags that should be quite useful.

Fifth, I do hope you find a place to move all the info on preparing to, because I have lots more questions for those of you in the know! Thanks for being so helpful.

jaimie43
03-05-2009, 11:30 AM
Courtsinsession...Google a search for "container gardening". Can be done in very little space. For example...Two years ago I bought one little tomato plant and tossed it in a pot on my front steps. After a couple weeks I put a tomato cage around it because it was GROWING! I was amazed at the tomatoes I got off that plant! I was giving them away I had so many. We live in the country on 5 acres and last year I decided that little plant did so well Im gonna grow a garden :) I planted 12 tomato plants among other veggies and well, I was able to supply my mother in laws restaurant with tomatoes for the whole summer.
This years garden wil be HUGE! Im canning.....

FifthEssence
03-05-2009, 04:42 PM
SURVIVALIST Tips associated with Home and Gardening based on the planetary positions and that of the Sun and the Moon.

FifthEssence
03-05-2009, 05:13 PM
copied from post by HOUSEMOUSE


I certainly can! I use it all the time when planting my seeds, transplanting my seedlings, etc... but wonder if it belongs on a different thread?

I am in zone 5, so what works for me will be a bit different in other zones, but the principles still stand.

You use the new moon to plant seeds that will sprout in 7 days or so. The full moon for those that need 14 days, and the new moon again for those that need 21 days or longer.

Try to transplant out when the moon is full.

housemouse
03-05-2009, 06:46 PM
I fully understand what others are saying that God will provide. I also understand that I have been taught since I was a little girl that God helps those who help themselves.

With the price of gas last summer, your nieces little road trip added up to an expensive coffee at Starbuck's. Sometimes you just have to find excuses and do crazy things to keep your sanity.

I was going to can meat and vegetables, but I don't know as I feel too safe with canning meat. I know all of you have helped calm me somewhat now that I know I am somewhat on the right track. I also have a bread maker and a vacuum sealer and bags that should be quite useful.

Fifth, I do hope you find a place to move all the info on preparing to, because I have lots more questions for those of you in the know! Thanks for being so helpful.

Courts, in order to can meats and "non-acid" veggies, soups, etc, safely, you need a Pressure Canner. Take a deep breath and calm down, everyone!

The days of pressure cookers exploding pea soup or oatmeal all over the kitchen are long gone! The "modern" ones have relief valves that eliminate that hazard. And, there are very nice pressure canners so we can can meats, soups, low acid veggies, etc. Google for deals!

Great that you have a bread maker! Those who don't need to know that you can make excellent bread in a Cuisinart, and it only takes a few minutes to mix and knead the ingredients. I made bread for our gang using my trusty Cuisinart for years, and the gang gave me a wonderful Bosch mixer for Christmas last year, so I could make and freeze up to eight loaves at a time. The Cuisinart is good for two loaves. I didn't want a KitchenAid, because these are good for general mixing, they really do not have the power to knead 8 loaves worth of dough at a time.

So, Courts, look for those really good deals on meat, and get a "wish-list" printed up for your birthday, Mother's Day, Christmas, etc. Nothing makes a woman more secure than a well-stocked pantry, full of glistening jars of home-made food.

And, since a big garden isn't practical, look for "pick your own" places, and prepare a picnic lunch, and get the family involved. They can help pick, process, and can with you! Look for recipes on the 'net, and get creative.

housemouse
03-05-2009, 06:59 PM
What I hope to do on this thread is put up the better times to take care of our homes and gardens.

We all know that the Moon travels through all the signs in about one month, and the Bible tells us that there is a time for everything under heaven. So, we can get in touch with the lunar rhythm, and take advantage of the best times to do things.

I will start with gardening as an example. If you look on the back of seed packages, they will usually tell you how long it "should" take for seeds to sprout.

Some seeds sprout right away, in seven days or less. Some take 14 days, and some take 21 or longer. What works well is to keep track of the new and full moons. Time the planting of your seeds so they will sprout at the new moon.

So, for tomatoes, if you plant the seed a few days before the new moon, they will sprout much faster than if you plant them at the full moon. This assumes you know to keep the seeds warm, etc... Once they have sprouted, you get the babies under shop lights, and they then prefer cooler temps.

I usually pot mine up after they have sprouted and have their first true leaves, around the time of the full moon. There is a reason for this.

Leaf growth takes place between the new moon and the full moon. Root growth takes place between the full moon and the new.

If you have questions, and are thinking of starting seeds, just ask! I have grown just about everything, even lavender, from seeds.

CourtsInSession
03-05-2009, 07:10 PM
Courts, in order to can meats and "non-acid" veggies, soups, etc, safely, you need a Pressure Canner. Take a deep breath and calm down, everyone!

The days of pressure cookers exploding pea soup or oatmeal all over the kitchen are long gone! The "modern" ones have relief valves that eliminate that hazard. And, there are very nice pressure canners so we can can meats, soups, low acid veggies, etc. Google for deals!

Great that you have a bread maker! Those who don't need to know that you can make excellent bread in a Cuisinart, and it only takes a few minutes to mix and knead the ingredients. I made bread for our gang using my trusty Cuisinart for years, and the gang gave me a wonderful Bosch mixer for Christmas last year, so I could make and freeze up to eight loaves at a time. The Cuisinart is good for two loaves. I didn't want a KitchenAid, because these are good for general mixing, they really do not have the power to knead 8 loaves worth of dough at a time.

So, Courts, look for those really good deals on meat, and get a "wish-list" printed up for your birthday, Mother's Day, Christmas, etc. Nothing makes a woman more secure than a well-stocked pantry, full of glistening jars of home-made food.

And, since a big garden isn't practical, look for "pick your own" places, and prepare a picnic lunch, and get the family involved. They can help pick, process, and can with you! Look for recipes on the 'net, and get creative.

Thanks Housemouse for the info. I found a site for the bosch mixer which makes more bread then my bread maker, that makes one loaf at a time. Please show me the way! Which mixer do you have?

http://www.mykitchencenter.com/Results.cfm?category=6&gclid=COrQ2t_yjJkCFQw9GgodICgimQ

Now I'm off to find a pressure canner. I am going to give canning meat a try.

housemouse
03-05-2009, 07:22 PM
The period from the new moon to the full moon is called the "waxing" moon.

The waxing moon takes in, plans, builds up, stores up energy, gathers and increases strength, is a good time for rest and recovery.

The period between the full moon and the new moon is called the "waning" moon.

The waning moon removes, detoxifies, cleans out, dries and hardens, and is a good time for action and expending energy.

So, it makes sense to plan your work during the waxing moon, and carry out your plans during the waning moon, to the extent that you can.

The moon will be full on March 10th at 10:38 PM here in NY State. Your time zone will have a different time, obviously. So, any projects around the house that you planned, thought about, got organized in the two weeks before March 10th will go more smoothly if you work to get them finished before the next new moon.

That next new moon will be on March 26th. Time to rest up, recover, plan, build up your reserves of energy, and get ready for the next full Moon to carry out the plans hatched in the waxing phase. Time to get back into action will be April 9th.

Give this a try for household tasks requiring some physical energy, and see how it works for you.

housemouse
03-05-2009, 07:28 PM
Thanks Housemouse for the info. I found a site for the bosch mixer which makes more bread then my bread maker, that makes one loaf at a time. Please show me the way! Which mixer do you have?

http://www.mykitchencenter.com/Results.cfm?category=6&gclid=COrQ2t_yjJkCFQw9GgodICgimQ

Now I'm off to find a pressure canner. I am going to give canning meat a try.


Mine is the Bosch Concept 7000, and I think they bought it from these folks linked below. My kitchen is small, and it fit below my cupboards. But, go for the best price you can find, and the one that suits your lifestyle. See if these people have Pressure Canners, then comparison shop!

http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/

housemouse
03-05-2009, 07:38 PM
Looked on the website I linked above, and my mixer has been discontinued, and it seems they have a newer model. But, I am not worried. Mine is wonderful, and I am so happy with it. I might ask for the parts for Mother's Day, though, while they are still available!

You get the one that suits you, and go for a good price.

http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/bosch_concept.aspx

housemouse
03-05-2009, 09:34 PM
I bake whenever we need the dough (silly pun). Home-baked bread is so much cheaper, and much more nutritious than "store" bread.

But, did you know there are days that are better for baking? Yep, there are.

Try baking when the moon is waning, and what is called a "flower" day (Gemini, Libra, Aquarius). It will keep much better, too.

But, you will notice that bread rises much better when the moon is waxing. You will not need as much yeast between the new and the full moon. This sounds like opposing ideas, right? But not really.

Baking when the moon is in Aries, Leo, and Sagittarius gives better results. Cancer, Scorpio and Pisces will not be as friendly, however.

So, right now the moon is waxing, and in Cancer. Not the best day for bread baking. It will rise nicely, but won't keep very well, and might have "over-rising" characteristics. Holes, separating tops, etc.

I need to bake, but will wait until the moon moves into Leo. That will be the morning of March 7th, Saturday, the day after tomorrow.

The moon will still be waxing, but Leo is a good sign. I will use less yeast than when the moon is waning, and will still get a nice rise.

Next post, when to get a nice haircut. Something we all want, right?

housemouse
03-05-2009, 10:02 PM
The best days to get your hair cut, take a guess?

Anyone think of the Lion's mane of Leo? Good for you!

And from February to August, Leo days are the best, particularly if one wants to increase the strength, do the best for thinning hair, or hair that is too oily. If you think about it, Leo always falls in a waxing moon in these months, and the waxing moon is a good time for hair treatments, like egg treatments.

(Beat up a whole egg, and work it into the hair, massaging it throughout, and into the scalp. After a few minutes, rinse it out with warm water. After the warm water rinse, do a final rinse with cold water.)

A cold water rinse is always a good idea, no matter what time of the lunar cycle. And, lay off the hair dryer during this cycle. Never blow dry the hair in the wrong direction, or at too high a temperature. This will just wreck your hair.

Virgo is second best sign for good hair cuts, and is better than Leo for permanent waves. During Leo, these are more likely to get the frizzies. If you want a hair cut that keeps it's form and beauty longer, Virgo is a good day to schedule that special cut!

The old-timers say not to wash your hair on days when the moon is in Pisces or Cancer. Pisces tends to aggravate dandruff, and Cancer tends to make your hair hard to manage, fly-away, and what my mom used to call "woofie".

Try these tips, and see how they work for you.

housemouse
03-05-2009, 10:43 PM
We have a full moon coming up on the 10th. If you followed my earlier post, you might remember that we do our planning when the moon is waxing, and rest up until the moon is full.

So, sit back, sip some tea, and think about what you really want to clean after the 10th. Take the time to think about what cleaning supplies you have on hand, and what you might need to collect/gather in. Consider yourselves getting your iCleaning batteries plugged in and re-charged.

Since the full moon on the 10th is pretty late at night, hold off until the 11th. Maybe get your hair trimmed and wait a few days before starting to air out and then clean.

Cleaning goes much easier when the moon is waning. And some signs are better than others for certain cleaning tasks during this period.

This waning moon period is a good time to wash, clean, and put away our winter clothing. It is time to clean and polish the winter boots and shoes, and put them away for next year.

If you want to tackle spring cleaning, wait until the moon moves into Libra, which is an "air" sign. This is a good time to air everything out, local weather permitting, of course. Shake out the blankets, comforters, curtains, mattresses, etc...

Then, when the moon moves into Scorpio, a water sign, do the heavy laundry, wash the walls, clean the windows, vacuum, but don't wash the wood floors. (these tend to absorb more water when the moon is in a water sign)

Some of us love to clean, and some of us hate to clean, but we all enjoy a clean and sparkling house. It makes sense to do it when the moon helps us to get the job done easily. So get your plans made, your sneakers ready, and see how fast you can blow through it all!

Anything you don't do this month, don't worry about. There will be another waning moon next month. Get in the rhythm of rest and plan, then work the plan.

butterfly1978
03-06-2009, 12:07 AM
OH, I am so glad you did this. Thank you HouseMouse and thank you Fifth.. You guys ROCK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Angelzgram
03-06-2009, 12:44 AM
Housemouse, I am thrilled! I love this thread!
:D For anyone looking to set a little extra food aside, I found a very interesting book at the library, titled "Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning" (Traditional Techniques using salt, oil. sugar, alcohol, vinegar, drying, cold storage, and Lactic Fermentation) from the farmers and gardeners of Terre Vivante, (France) with a foreward by Deborah Madison.
One of the 250 recipes, Wild Vegetables, refers to Maria Thun's Biodynamic calendar, which shows the best time to sow, plant, and harvest according to the moon's position within the constellations. Are you familiar with this or do you have another favorite book?
And how did you know I desperately need a haircut? :laugh:

CourtsInSession
03-06-2009, 12:51 AM
I have ordered the 23 qt. pressure canner and it's on it's way. I talked to my elderly mom and she said that my grandmother use to can meat. She said it was delicious. I'm really anxious to try canning meat before the weather gets nice. I guess my swimming pool isn't going to see me as much this summer. This thread is absolutely great and is giving me some confidence that I can at least give this survival mode a try.

housemouse
03-06-2009, 01:10 AM
Angelzgram, I am not familiar with the book, but truly believe in the benefits of the "old ways", including lacto-fermentation. I am going to try to get a copy, because it sounds so interesting.

I have and love "Nourishing Foods" by Sally Fallon. Everyone should have this wonderful book on the kitchen bookshelf! Linked below is a review...

http://cookingresources.suite101.com/article.cfm/nourishing_traditions_book_review

John Jeavons is the gardener who wrote about moon phases and seed sprouting. His book is on my shelf, and it is a wonderful reference book. Alas, neither my husband or I am young and strong enough to garden his way. We are more at the Square Foot Gardening for the Handicapped stage of life.

But he has a very good explanation of why the moon works on the seeds, and if you can find it at your local library, it is worth the read!

housemouse
03-06-2009, 01:22 AM
I have ordered the 23 qt. pressure canner and it's on it's way. I talked to my elderly mom and she said that my grandmother use to can meat. She said it was delicious. I'm really anxious to try canning meat before the weather gets nice. I guess my swimming pool isn't going to see me as much this summer. This thread is absolutely great and is giving me some confidence that I can at least give this survival mode a try.

CourtsInSession, you are on the way! And you can use that swimming pool to center you, while you plan. Remember to rest and recharge while the moon is waxing, and charge into work while it is waning. Get with the rhythms of life.

There is a time for planning, research, relaxing, rebuilding, and a time for activity, execution, and production. Learn to go with the moon. Trust the wonderful plan given to us.

And, give growing some easy veggies and herbs a try, even if in pots. You might be happy to have your own basil plants, when you look at the prices for a bunch at the local market!

Here is a very reliable source for seeds. My favorite, because they are honest and trustworthy. I have been ordering from them for years. Their catalog is practically all a newbie needs to figure out how to grow stuff. They even highlight in yellow the best bets for new gardeners.

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/Home.aspx?ct=

housemouse
03-06-2009, 01:41 AM
Housemouse, I am thrilled! I love this thread!
:D For anyone looking to set a little extra food aside, I found a very interesting book at the library, titled "Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning" (Traditional Techniques using salt, oil. sugar, alcohol, vinegar, drying, cold storage, and Lactic Fermentation) from the farmers and gardeners of Terre Vivante, (France) with a foreward by Deborah Madison.
One of the 250 recipes, Wild Vegetables, refers to Maria Thun's Biodynamic calendar, which shows the best time to sow, plant, and harvest according to the moon's position within the constellations. Are you familiar with this or do you have another favorite book?
And how did you know I desperately need a haircut? :laugh:

Just ordered Maria Thun's Calendar for 2009, and one of her books. Thank you, Angelzgram, for the "head's up" on this author.

I sit here with my little packets of seeds for this year's garden. Wondering how I can get them all planted, then tend them all through harvest time. The very best way to get through the March doldrums here in zone 5 is to have more seeds than you think you can plant, and time from new to full moon to try to figure it all out.

Life is sweet! And, it isn't found at the mall! Get the husbands involved in planning, dreaming, and thinking, between now and the 11th of March. But, if you are in frozen zone 5, like we are...

Might be indoor work during the waning moon... getting shop lights hung to start a few seeds on a heat mat in the basement, etc.

Zoe Bogart
03-06-2009, 06:51 AM
I'm so glad you started this thread, housemouse. I can't tell you how many times my dad used to tell me I was doing things at the wrong time. :eek: I'd be working away on my plants and he'd say it wasn't "the right moon" for that. He always followed precisely all the astronomical directions for his gardens.

I, on the other hand, and an astrologer of sorts, would never consult any sort of time table except my own - I do it when I feel like it. Either we were both blessed with green thumbs or I have the green thumb and the book instructions worked for him. We both always had productive gardens. I was outside looking at my highly neglected plants yesterday and realized the cold and snow didn't bother them this year, even though I've neglected them terribly. They just need a bit of pruning and maybe a layer of fresh soil.

As for my veggie/fruit garden, the trees and vines from last year will probably produce again, as usual. I'm late as usual preparing my ground for the rest of the veggies/fruits, but they also produce. It always baffled my dad because I'm always "behind schedule", yet my stuff grows.

My natal chart doesn't seem to scream "green thumb" to me, but maybe I'm missing something. Any idea what makes a garden grow, astrologically and natally? Earth signs, maybe? Water? Moon? Interesting thought?

Incidentally, about six weeks ago I changed the desktop on my pc to a pic of a family posing in their Victory Garden. :) I was hoping it would inspire me to get cracking. As usual, I'm late. I was supposed to plant a new tree in January and it hasn't been done yet. Ouch. I'm the Procrastination Queen. I love to can and preserve food and bought all sorts of new jars last year. So I'm ready for the produce to come in, I just have to plant it. Oh yes, I'm in Zone 9.

Have you seen this?

http://www.youtube.com/user/DepressionCooking

http://depressioncooking.blogspot.com/

http://174.129.234.45/Depression_Cooking/Welcome.html

Notice, Clara says "I shut off the gas" but she's using an electric stove. Old habits die hard, right?

housemouse
03-06-2009, 02:22 PM
This is an interesting website for those of you interested in gardening by the moon.

http://www.gardeningbythemoon.com/

aksleuth, you may naturally be more in tune with the moon than you think. I like to use the moon because it motivates me to get things done. I am a procrastinator too.

Because of my health, I have to spread things out, and not get in a corner where I am behind schedule and have to do too much at a time. Also, since we have a short growing season here, it is important to pay close attention to what to plant, and when.

When to plant my tomato seedling out this spring is bothering me a bit. Our last frost date is around May 15th. But the full moon this May is early, around the 9th.

So, do I wait until the full moon in June, losing growing days? Or do I follow the old gardening adage that the the full moon is usually the last frost time of a given spring, and plant out early.

I think I will plant out early, and be prepared to protect the baby plants, but I will hedge my bets by holding back, and having a second set of seedlings, just in case.

I time the starting of my seeds by the date of planting them out. The Old Farmer's Almanac is predicting a warmer April and May for us here, so maybe I will get lucky!

Kat
03-06-2009, 02:36 PM
Is this thread only for gardening tips? I have been making my own laundry soap for about 2 yrs how because two of my children have severe allergies and exzema.

I can share my recipe if anyone likes...it saves me around about 500.00 to 600.00 dollars a year and it's easier on the skin and it's "green".

If anyone is interested I'll be happy to post how to do it and the fabric softner I use instead of buying it.

leorising
03-06-2009, 04:08 PM
Is this thread only for gardening tips? I have been making my own laundry soap for about 2 yrs how because two of my children have severe allergies and exzema.

I can share my recipe if anyone likes...it saves me around about 500.00 to 600.00 dollars a year and it's easier on the skin and it's "green".

If anyone is interested I'll be happy to post how to do it and the fabric softner I use instead of buying it.


I would love to have both recipes! Many thanks in advance!

Kat
03-06-2009, 04:41 PM
Thank you for having an interest in my post leorising. If this is the wrong thread perhaps we can have a thread in the parking lot with money saving tips?

Here is my recipe:

1. - 1 Cup of grated bar soap*

2. - 1 Cup of borax

3. - 1 Cup of Washing Soda **

* I use Zote bar laundry soap found in the laundry ailse at Walmart. You can use any hard, lightly perfumed soap. Ivory is a good choice.

** This is different from baking soda. It is a completely different product. It softens the water as well as lifts stains (good on greasy stains).

I take an old cheese grater (metal) and grate the soap in a container. Then I measure out one cup of borax and one cup of Washing Soda and mix together.

I then put it into my mini-food processor (purchased at walmart too very cheap) and process until it is a fine consistency. You choose how fine you like.

It can take as little as two tablespoons to one quarter cup per load for wash. It depends on the hardness of your water. Ours is very hard, so I use 1/4 cup.

I make this in bulk now. I make it about twice a year. It takes me 45 minutes to create enough detergent to last 6 people 6 months. (I have my kids help me grate while they watch tv).

You can adjust the ingredients to the recipe to serve your purposes, such as sometimes I add a bit more borax because our water is so very hard.

Fabric Softner:

Believe it or not, and it does sound gross. I use white vinegar for fabric softner. No residue in clothing of soap or vinegar smell.

1/4 for small to medium loads
1/2 for large to very large loads

Yes you can smell it in the room when you first put it in at the beginning of rinse, but once the cycle is finished you can't detect it.

It softens well, but doesn't leave a fragrance that can be irratating to skin and those with asthma.

Good luck! I have saved hundreds of dollars this way, although I did it originally to help my son with his allergies, eczema and asthma.

O/T I want to learn how to make my own pure soap (yes lye soap but it doesn't have lye itself in it after the soapnification process!). I buy it now, but once I learn to make it I will use it instead of Zote for laundry.

The pure soap has cleared up my sons eczema with use, and my other kids acne is much better. No itchies!

housemouse
03-06-2009, 04:52 PM
Is this thread only for gardening tips? I have been making my own laundry soap for about 2 yrs how because two of my children have severe allergies and exzema.

I can share my recipe if anyone likes...it saves me around about 500.00 to 600.00 dollars a year and it's easier on the skin and it's "green".

If anyone is interested I'll be happy to post how to do it and the fabric softner I use instead of buying it.

This thread is good for all house and garden duties, Kat. For laundry, did you know that the waning moon is better for removing stains, etc. than the waxing moon?

People with children do not have the luxury of doing laundry only when the moon is on the wane, obviously. The best sign is Pisces, but Scorpio and Cancer work well too.

The waxing moon tends to have a big build up of suds, but the stains stay behind more easily.

leorising
03-06-2009, 06:13 PM
Thank you for having an interest in my post leorising. If this is the wrong thread perhaps we can have a thread in the parking lot with money saving tips?

Here is my recipe:

1. - 1 Cup of grated bar soap*

2. - 1 Cup of borax

3. - 1 Cup of Washing Soda **

* I use Zote bar laundry soap found in the laundry ailse at Walmart. You can use any hard, lightly perfumed soap. Ivory is a good choice.

** This is different from baking soda. It is a completely different product. It softens the water as well as lifts stains (good on greasy stains).

I take an old cheese grater (metal) and grate the soap in a container. Then I measure out one cup of borax and one cup of Washing Soda and mix together.

I then put it into my mini-food processor (purchased at walmart too very cheap) and process until it is a fine consistency. You choose how fine you like.

It can take as little as two tablespoons to one quarter cup per load for wash. It depends on the hardness of your water. Ours is very hard, so I use 1/4 cup.

I make this in bulk now. I make it about twice a year. It takes me 45 minutes to create enough detergent to last 6 people 6 months. (I have my kids help me grate while they watch tv).

You can adjust the ingredients to the recipe to serve your purposes, such as sometimes I add a bit more borax because our water is so very hard.

Fabric Softner:

Believe it or not, and it does sound gross. I use white vinegar for fabric softner. No residue in clothing of soap or vinegar smell.

1/4 for small to medium loads
1/2 for large to very large loads

Yes you can smell it in the room when you first put it in at the beginning of rinse, but once the cycle is finished you can't detect it.

It softens well, but doesn't leave a fragrance that can be irratating to skin and those with asthma.

Good luck! I have saved hundreds of dollars this way, although I did it originally to help my son with his allergies, eczema and asthma.

O/T I want to learn how to make my own pure soap (yes lye soap but it doesn't have lye itself in it after the soapnification process!). I buy it now, but once I learn to make it I will use it instead of Zote for laundry.

The pure soap has cleared up my sons eczema with use, and my other kids acne is much better. No itchies!


Thank you so much, Kat! I will definitely try this, as there are allergies in our household as well! I appreciate your taking the time to share this very much!

Zoe Bogart
03-06-2009, 06:54 PM
Kat and housemouse, thank you so much for the laundry tips. Removing stains when the moon is waning makes a lot of sense.

Kat, I also have problems with laundry detergent due to allergies in the family. I can use most detergents if I rinse twice. My daughter can only use Purex laundry detergent, so guess which one we use - and I always rinse twice. I have washing soda somewhere. I use it on occasion. I've also used vinegar. In fact, I use vinegar for lots of things, including cleaning my drains, baking soda and vinegar, let it set for a bit, then rinse it down the drain with lots of water.

What do you store all your homemade laundry soap in? I'm thinking the old cat litter buckets would be great because they have lids. I use them for all sorts of things anyway, including gardening supplies, and cemetery headstone cleaning supplies. As a genealologist, it helps to have those supplies handy when visiting cemeteries looking for dates. Can read the inscription? Try washing the stone. There are other tricks, too, but that should be in the genealogy thread.

housemouse, you may be correct that I am intuitively intuned with the moon. I have a Cancer ascendent and the moon is my most elevated planet - 10th house.

About your tomatoes seedling, I think you are wise to plant "early" and save some for "later". Our agricultural extension service recommends it, especially if you want to extend your growing season. Also, I usually do my gardening "when I feel like it" (health issues) and when the weather is good. So I think if you work with your new planned schedule, it could work to your advantage - follow your instincts, your health, and the weather.

My gardens aren't large. I can't handle large, so I make use of the ground space I utilize and plant a variety and double up by using the "wide rows" plan. You can read about it in Joy of Gardening by Dick Raymond. He lives in the northeast, Connecticut, I think. My edition of the book is 1982, published by Garden Way. It's still readily available and can easily be purchased at Amazon.com.

aeli2468
03-06-2009, 07:01 PM
Thank you for having an interest in my post leorising. If this is the wrong thread perhaps we can have a thread in the parking lot with money saving tips?

Here is my recipe:

1. - 1 Cup of grated bar soap*

2. - 1 Cup of borax

3. - 1 Cup of Washing Soda **

* I use Zote bar laundry soap found in the laundry ailse at Walmart. You can use any hard, lightly perfumed soap. Ivory is a good choice.


(snipped respectfully)

This is almost the same exact recipe I use. I use Fels-Naptha bars for my soap. This can be found with the laundry supply stuff, but look hard (though I have found it in multiple grocery stores in my area in South-East PA).

Another really great thing about this recipe is it is low-sudsing. For anyone who has a front load washer and were told you 'have to buy' special HE detergent, these work just fine. The issue is with the suds, nothing actual special in the detergent.

Also, I love the fact that it has a very light clean smell, no flowery overtones or anything.
~elizabeth

housemouse
03-06-2009, 07:12 PM
First, get a couple of very dirty articles of clothing.

Second, when the moon is waxing, place one article in a wash basin with your preferred soap.

Third, do the same thing when the Moon is waning.

See if you notice that during the waxing moon, the water will stay nice and soapy, while the dirty item stays kind of dirty.

Then, in the waning moon, the dirt comes off, and you can see by looking at the suds where it has gone.

After all, we housewives and homemakers can play around with lunar science, and it makes our lives a bit more interesting. Not that we should chatter about it at the next "ever-so-sophisticated" cocktail party we attend.

Probably better to discuss when best to start a corporation, or plan a lawsuit, right?

RhythmicSun
03-06-2009, 07:50 PM
This is a neat thread, thanks housemouse for starting it. Spring is coming!!

Does anyone know where to buy Zote besides Wal-Mart? Not to get political, but I will not shop at WalMart. I haven't in almost 10 years and don't want to start!

housemouse
03-06-2009, 08:03 PM
I don't like Wal-mart either, but it isn't political for me.

It is hard enough to walk through the local supermarket, and the very thought of having to walk through the many aisles of Wal-mart makes my leg go numb instantly.

If we were all wise/smart/whatever, we should start supporting our local "mom and pop" shops and stores. We will pay more, but we can help to keep them in business, and can adjust our budgets accordingly.

The large box stores don't think much about our local communities. All they care about is the bottom line. After they drive the local businesses into bankruptcy, and then local sales don't support their bottom line, they will shut up shop in a NY minute, leaving us with nowhere to go.

Better, in my mind, to keep the locals going, than to risk it all to some corporate headquarters looking at the bottom line.

Just my humble opinion. You are totally entitled to your own, obviously.

RhythmicSun
03-06-2009, 09:15 PM
I totally agree with what you wrote! And that is one of the many reason why I don't shop at WalMart.

Angelzgram
03-06-2009, 10:12 PM
QUOTE=CourtsInSession;3417464]I have ordered the 23 qt. pressure canner and it's on it's way. I talked to my elderly mom and she said that my grandmother use to can meat. She said it was delicious. I'm really anxious to try canning meat before the weather gets nice. I guess my swimming pool isn't going to see me as much this summer. This thread is absolutely great and is giving me some confidence that I can at least give this survival mode a try.[/QUOTE]

This website, jordansfarm.wordpress.com is about the simple life and has all kinds of meat canning recipes, household recipes, gardening, etc! The meat canning one looks pretty easy, too.
All of the information on this thread is so encouraging. I have always been interested in the simple life, but thought it'd be too hard to learn it all.
I realized, though, that even learning a few basic things is such a confidence builder. I'm afraid of pressure canners, but I've canned tomatos by the hot water bath method. I'm not a very good gardener, but I've grown tomatos in planters in the yard. And, I have dried lavendar to use in my closets, parsley from my sister (by hanging small bunches tied together upside down in my kitchen from straight pins I pounded into the wall with a shoe!) and rose hips. I 'm in zone 4 and our soil is sandy and poor, so have no luck with pumpkins, etc. Or maybe it's just me!
I used to have buckets under the roofline to catch rainwater. My husband used to have a fit about them all the time! UNTIL we had a terrible storm and no electricity or water for 6 days. BUT my buckets were great for toilet flushing and watering the animals! We still laugh about that! Nope, he never complains about my strange methods anymore!:crazy:
I'm trying to talk him into getting a few chickens to eat all the TICKS, but no luck so far!:chicken:
It is so much fun to get together with a friend or neighbor and work together.
And then SWIM in the POOL when you're done!

CourtsInSession
03-06-2009, 10:54 PM
Thank you for having an interest in my post leorising. If this is the wrong thread perhaps we can have a thread in the parking lot with money saving tips?

Here is my recipe:

1. - 1 Cup of grated bar soap*

2. - 1 Cup of borax

3. - 1 Cup of Washing Soda **

* I use Zote bar laundry soap found in the laundry ailse at Walmart. You can use any hard, lightly perfumed soap. Ivory is a good choice.

** This is different from baking soda. It is a completely different product. It softens the water as well as lifts stains (good on greasy stains).

I take an old cheese grater (metal) and grate the soap in a container. Then I measure out one cup of borax and one cup of Washing Soda and mix together.

I then put it into my mini-food processor (purchased at walmart too very cheap) and process until it is a fine consistency. You choose how fine you like.

It can take as little as two tablespoons to one quarter cup per load for wash. It depends on the hardness of your water. Ours is very hard, so I use 1/4 cup.

I make this in bulk now. I make it about twice a year. It takes me 45 minutes to create enough detergent to last 6 people 6 months. (I have my kids help me grate while they watch tv).

You can adjust the ingredients to the recipe to serve your purposes, such as sometimes I add a bit more borax because our water is so very hard.

Fabric Softner:

Believe it or not, and it does sound gross. I use white vinegar for fabric softner. No residue in clothing of soap or vinegar smell.

1/4 for small to medium loads
1/2 for large to very large loads

Yes you can smell it in the room when you first put it in at the beginning of rinse, but once the cycle is finished you can't detect it.

It softens well, but doesn't leave a fragrance that can be irratating to skin and those with asthma.

Good luck! I have saved hundreds of dollars this way, although I did it originally to help my son with his allergies, eczema and asthma.

O/T I want to learn how to make my own pure soap (yes lye soap but it doesn't have lye itself in it after the soapnification process!). I buy it now, but once I learn to make it I will use it instead of Zote for laundry.

The pure soap has cleared up my sons eczema with use, and my other kids acne is much better. No itchies!

When you make enough to last 6 months, how many bars of soap do you grate, and how many boxes of borax and washing soda does it take? I can't wait to try this because laundry detergent is outrageously priced any more.

My grandfather owned a steam laundry when I was growing up. I wish I had paid attention because he only used lye soap that he made to do the laundry. I could kick myself for so many things I didn't pay attention to that my grandparents use to do.

Scroll down a little bit on this site and there is a recipe for lard soap.

http://farmgal.tripod.com/lyesoapconcoctions.html

Sonne
03-06-2009, 11:49 PM
My grandparents lived through the great Depression. They were very thrifty people.

My grandmother was a wonderful cook. Here is one recipe that costs nearly nothing to make, but fills you up. My great grandmother, who was from Slovenia, made it too. I have no idea how to spell the name of it, so I'll spell it phonetically:

Holl oosh key, with the accent on the Holl. If I had to guess how to spell it, it would be Haluski.

Wash and shred one head cabbage and place in cold water. Heat to a boil, boil until tender and drain. Keep the water near boiling for drop noodles below.

Drop noodles - 3 cups flour, 2 eggs and 1 large grated potato - mix thoroughly.

Drop by teaspoon full into boiling cabbage water until they float, remove and drain.

Fry 3 pieces of bacon with a sliced medium onion. Drain and crumble bacon.

Mix cabbage, noodles, crumbled bacon and fried onions. Reheat over a double boiler if necessary. Salt, pepper, a little butter on top and eat!

My husband likes a ham hock with his, which I cook before. He needs real MEAT, dont ya know.

Zoe Bogart
03-07-2009, 01:07 AM
Here you go, Sonne.

How to Make Haluski (Cabbage and Noodles)

http://pittsburgh.about.com/c/ht/00/10/How_Haluski_Cabbage_Noodles0972520187.htm


This is just to let you know you spelled it correctly. I put "haluski" into Google, and found several links for recipes for Haluski.

For everyone, Google is your friend. You can find all sorts of great stuff by using Google. Plug in something like: wartime recipes, wartime rationing, victory gardens, anything wartime related. Don't forget World War I (the Great War). You might want to look for books in your local library for ideas.

Here's something about modern families and rationing:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-465769/Can-modern-family-survive-wartime-rations.html

Life has changed dramatically since I was a kid but I still remember how we lived without answering machines, cell phones, DVRs. If we wanted to watch a TV show, we had to be in front of a TV at airtime, no watching later at our convenience. I also remember my mother's wringer washing machine, hanging clothes on the clothesline and ironing everything because the fabric was so wrinkled after being washed. There was no microwave oven, either. We had one telephone. We only received gifts for Christmas (the biggie) and our birthdays. We received candy at Easter and exchanged little paper Valentines. None of the gift giving for everything under the sun like we do now. We didn't buy what we couldn't pay cash for and our houses weren't overstuffed with things like many houses are now. We went on only two real vacations before I was 18. We rarely went to restaurants. We played cards and board games often. We were comfortable.

RhythmicSun
03-07-2009, 03:16 AM
Life has changed dramatically since I was a kid but I still remember how we lived without answering machines, cell phones, DVRs. If we wanted to watch a TV show, we had to be in front of a TV at airtime, no watching later at our convenience. I also remember my mother's wringer washing machine, hanging clothes on the clothesline and ironing everything because the fabric was so wrinkled after being washed. There was no microwave oven, either. We had one telephone. We only received gifts for Christmas (the biggie) and our birthdays. We received candy at Easter and exchanged little paper Valentines. None of the gift giving for everything under the sun like we do now. We didn't buy what we couldn't pay cash for and our houses weren't overstuffed with things like many houses are now. We went on only two real vacations before I was 18. We rarely went to restaurants. We played cards and board games often. We were comfortable.

I love this post. All that and so much more. One of my clearest memories is my mother sprinkling clothing, rolling it up, putting it in the fridge, bringing it out later and ironing it. Sounds crazy but back then it was totally normal!

housemouse
03-07-2009, 05:29 PM
I love this post. All that and so much more. One of my clearest memories is my mother sprinkling clothing, rolling it up, putting it in the fridge, bringing it out later and ironing it. Sounds crazy but back then it was totally normal!

I remember that too, but are you old enough to remember the "bouffant" slips being dunked in starch and hung, dripping, to make our skirts all stand out away from our young bodies?

An old astrological tid-bit about the best time to cut fingernails. Friday evenings, after sunset. Supposed to make them stronger, and be good for your teeth too. Why they thought that, I have no idea, but I love collecting all the tid-bits of astrological lore.

RhythmicSun
03-08-2009, 12:07 AM
I remember that too, but are you old enough to remember the "bouffant" slips being dunked in starch and hung, dripping, to make our skirts all stand out away from our young bodies?

An old astrological tid-bit about the best time to cut fingernails. Friday evenings, after sunset. Supposed to make them stronger, and be good for your teeth too. Why they thought that, I have no idea, but I love collecting all the tid-bits of astrological lore.

Hi housemouse, I think that was an early 50s thing and I was probably too young to remember that. Or, more likely, my mother just wasn't into that type of style, knowing her. She was into square dancing with my father. They would get dressed up every Saturday night and go square dancing.

Writing this stuff makes me feel ancient! :D

CourtsInSession
03-08-2009, 12:21 AM
I love this post. All that and so much more. One of my clearest memories is my mother sprinkling clothing, rolling it up, putting it in the fridge, bringing it out later and ironing it. Sounds crazy but back then it was totally normal!


Did your mother use a pop bottle with a gadget that you put in the bottle opening that had little holes in it in order to sprinkle the clothes? OM, I remember so well my mother doing this and then rolling them up in a plastic bag and putting in the fridge. Wasn't life beautiful and so much simplier???

CourtsInSession
03-08-2009, 12:28 AM
QUOTE=CourtsInSession;3417464]I have ordered the 23 qt. pressure canner and it's on it's way. I talked to my elderly mom and she said that my grandmother use to can meat. She said it was delicious. I'm really anxious to try canning meat before the weather gets nice. I guess my swimming pool isn't going to see me as much this summer. This thread is absolutely great and is giving me some confidence that I can at least give this survival mode a try.

This website, jordansfarm.wordpress.com is about the simple life and has all kinds of meat canning recipes, household recipes, gardening, etc! The meat canning one looks pretty easy, too.
All of the information on this thread is so encouraging. I have always been interested in the simple life, but thought it'd be too hard to learn it all.
I realized, though, that even learning a few basic things is such a confidence builder. I'm afraid of pressure canners, but I've canned tomatos by the hot water bath method. I'm not a very good gardener, but I've grown tomatos in planters in the yard. And, I have dried lavendar to use in my closets, parsley from my sister (by hanging small bunches tied together upside down in my kitchen from straight pins I pounded into the wall with a shoe!) and rose hips. I 'm in zone 4 and our soil is sandy and poor, so have no luck with pumpkins, etc. Or maybe it's just me!
I used to have buckets under the roofline to catch rainwater. My husband used to have a fit about them all the time! UNTIL we had a terrible storm and no electricity or water for 6 days. BUT my buckets were great for toilet flushing and watering the animals! We still laugh about that! Nope, he never complains about my strange methods anymore!:crazy:
I'm trying to talk him into getting a few chickens to eat all the TICKS, but no luck so far!:chicken:
It is so much fun to get together with a friend or neighbor and work together.
And then SWIM in the POOL when you're done![/QUOTE]

Thank you so much for the link Angelz, I will go there and read. I have always been afraid of a pressure cooker/canner, but I guess they have been greatly improved upon since the 50's/60's. I have always used a hot water bath to can tomatoes too. My husbands boss's wife uses a pressure canner all the time to can venison and she loves it. Another guy at work borrowed it to can his venison and also had no problem. I can remember my mom using a pressure cooker a few times while I was growing up and we weren't allowed in the kitchen because it might explode. I wonder where I might have gotten my fear of pressure cookers from....lol!

Kat
03-08-2009, 12:40 AM
I'm sorry that I haven't checked back in with this thread. I really didn't know anyone would be interested in making their own laundry detergent, and I wasn't sure if this was the thread to put that recipe either. Thank you for the warm reception.

To answer the question of how many bars I grate for 6 mos. supply. I buy Zote bars and I don't have a wrapper left to tell the oz. of the bar. They are fairly large so I use 6-8 (depends on how many are on the shelf, I am not the only one that buys them I guess!).

I buy 2 4lb boxes of Borax and 2 large boxes of Washing Soda (none left) that would be about the equal amount of Borax.

I keep mine in a large tote with a lid (rubbermaid storage box that I had around not using) I have another smaller container that I had laying around (old kitty litter container scoop away) that I transfer from large bin to smaller so that it is easy to move around in laundry room. I store my large container in my pantry on the floor.

About Borax. I can't use a lot of cleansers that have fragrance to them.(triggers asthma) I use borax to clean out my tubs of hard water and the soap scum that comes from them. I simply make a loose paste, rub it all over the tub...faucets and shower walls. Wait about 15 mins? (while I clean the other areas of the bathroom) and then go back and the soap scum washes off with very little elbow grease. Cheap, easy, allergy friendly and green to boot.

Another thing about Borax is it will kill fugus and mold. Bleach doesn't. Make a loose paste of Borax for grout if you have mold or mildew and let set for a while. Go back and scrub out with brush and all gone. Kills the spores not just bleach them out so that you can't see them.

I had a problem with mold growing on the walls of one bathroom because we didn't know that the vent fan had broken. I used Borax to clean the mold off the walls. Never another problem, after the fan was fixed.

Thank you for the lye soap recipe, once we move and get settled again I'll be experiementing with that! :)

For those that don't shop Walmart, I have found a few items such as lye soap and borax at Ace Hardware and other home shops.

jaimie43
03-08-2009, 05:38 PM
Is this thread only for gardening tips? I have been making my own laundry soap for about 2 yrs how because two of my children have severe allergies and exzema.

I can share my recipe if anyone likes...it saves me around about 500.00 to 600.00 dollars a year and it's easier on the skin and it's "green".

If anyone is interested I'll be happy to post how to do it and the fabric softner I use instead of buying it.

Wow! I make my own to! Practically the same recipe. I use Ivory bar soap-cant find the Fels or Castile soap around here. I also use the vinegar in the rinse. I love essential oils with lavender being my favorite so I add some to the detergent and to the rinse water. I also make lavender sachets for my dryer. I grow lavender too. Can you tell I like lavender?lol...

RhythmicSun
03-09-2009, 03:02 PM
Did your mother use a pop bottle with a gadget that you put in the bottle opening that had little holes in it in order to sprinkle the clothes? OM, I remember so well my mother doing this and then rolling them up in a plastic bag and putting in the fridge. Wasn't life beautiful and so much simplier???

Hi CIS, just getting back after being away a couple of days. Yes, that's exactly what she used! I forget just how and why it worked. I know spray bottles weren't everything in those days, but it seems like they would have been.

I am going to try making that soap recipe. My mother used to use Fels Naphtha all the time. She would just moisten the fabric and the bar and rub the fabric on the bar, then soak and throw in the (wringer!) washer.

I think a lot of the old stuff is a good thing to do. Some of it isn't but much of it is!

RhythmicSun
03-09-2009, 03:07 PM
I'm sorry that I haven't checked back in with this thread. I really didn't know anyone would be interested in making their own laundry detergent, and I wasn't sure if this was the thread to put that recipe either. Thank you for the warm reception.

To answer the question of how many bars I grate for 6 mos. supply. I buy Zote bars and I don't have a wrapper left to tell the oz. of the bar. They are fairly large so I use 6-8 (depends on how many are on the shelf, I am not the only one that buys them I guess!).

I buy 2 4lb boxes of Borax and 2 large boxes of Washing Soda (none left) that would be about the equal amount of Borax.

I keep mine in a large tote with a lid (rubbermaid storage box that I had around not using) I have another smaller container that I had laying around (old kitty litter container scoop away) that I transfer from large bin to smaller so that it is easy to move around in laundry room. I store my large container in my pantry on the floor.

About Borax. I can't use a lot of cleansers that have fragrance to them.(triggers asthma) I use borax to clean out my tubs of hard water and the soap scum that comes from them. I simply make a loose paste, rub it all over the tub...faucets and shower walls. Wait about 15 mins? (while I clean the other areas of the bathroom) and then go back and the soap scum washes off with very little elbow grease. Cheap, easy, allergy friendly and green to boot.

Another thing about Borax is it will kill fugus and mold. Bleach doesn't. Make a loose paste of Borax for grout if you have mold or mildew and let set for a while. Go back and scrub out with brush and all gone. Kills the spores not just bleach them out so that you can't see them.

I had a problem with mold growing on the walls of one bathroom because we didn't know that the vent fan had broken. I used Borax to clean the mold off the walls. Never another problem, after the fan was fixed.

Thank you for the lye soap recipe, once we move and get settled again I'll be experiementing with that! :)

For those that don't shop Walmart, I have found a few items such as lye soap and borax at Ace Hardware and other home shops.

Great post Kat, you have lit a fire under me! I have a relative who will probably want to chip in on this. She has a lot of cats so we have plenty of scoop away containers to use to store it all. And thanks for the tip about where else to buy Zote!

butterfly1978
03-09-2009, 03:27 PM
Hey guys, I wanted to let you guys know what I am doing. I wanted to share it because I think its a good idea for everyone to do. As links are posted I print off the page I got a three ring binder and I am putting together a survival , How to book for my family. I know that you can easily go buy a book but, you can put together your own and it can cover a variety of different topics which might apply to your specific situation.... Such as this website: http://www.wildernesscollege.com/plants-used-for-medicine.html
It is important to me to know what plants can be used as medicines if it ever comes down to not having access to certain meds. I have two kids with Asthma, my son has a skin condition in which everytime he gets a bug bite or a scratch it gets infected. I have found that Honey as well as garlic are great for wounds. I am already using some of these things, it helps with cost to. If we ever do get in the situation where we have to "live off the land" I want to be sure I am prepared, but going from a lifestyle where things are readily available on demand to a senerio where things such as food and medicines are not available, it might be a good idea to go ahead now and put together a survival guide for your own family. Thanks guys for all the links, the gardening tips are wonderful. I apologize if this is off topic, but actually its not I think its a great idea for everyone to print this stuff off.

Angelzgram
03-09-2009, 05:54 PM
:clap: great idea! I can still access my info even if the power goes out!!!!!!!!!
Thank you!

CourtsInSession
03-09-2009, 07:09 PM
Hi CIS, just getting back after being away a couple of days. Yes, that's exactly what she used! I forget just how and why it worked. I know spray bottles weren't everything in those days, but it seems like they would have been.

I am going to try making that soap recipe. My mother used to use Fels Naphtha all the time. She would just moisten the fabric and the bar and rub the fabric on the bar, then soak and throw in the (wringer!) washer.

I think a lot of the old stuff is a good thing to do. Some of it isn't but much of it is!

The little metal gadget had cork around it to hold it in the pop bottle and the the head had little tiny holes in it that the water sprinkled out of onto the clothes. I wonder if my mom still has hers somewhere? I must say the steam iron was a great invention. I'll see if I can find a graphic of one somewhere on the net.

http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL64/160990/21673468/357238386.jpg

CourtsInSession
03-10-2009, 03:24 AM
I have read several places that when you put sugar, flour, macaroni, etc. in large jars for storing, to put a few leaves of bay on top to keep bugs out. Do you use fresh bay leaves or dried, does anyone here know?? Also, does it leave any taste or odor in the food that you have stored?

RhythmicSun
03-10-2009, 08:49 PM
The little metal gadget had cork around it to hold it in the pop bottle and the the head had little tiny holes in it that the water sprinkled out of onto the clothes. I wonder if my mom still has hers somewhere? I must say the steam iron was a great invention. I'll see if I can find a graphic of one somewhere on the net.

http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL64/160990/21673468/357238386.jpg

Looks familiar! Seems like my mother stopped doing that in the early 60's. Guess that's when spray starch and other items came on the market.

CourtsInSession
03-11-2009, 07:56 PM
Here's a link for other helpful uses for Fels Naptha (sp?)soap.

http://www.soapsgonebuy.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=D1001&Show=ExtInfo

the by and by
03-11-2009, 11:12 PM
Reading these posts has brought back so many memories such as sprinkling the clothes rolling them up and put in plastic and put in the fridge, learned from my mother and did it myself until perma-press came into our lives. Washing, whitening and starching curtains and husbands shirts(collars and cuffs). It seems like another world sometimes. I always had a garden and canned when I married. My dad always planted by the Farmer's Almanac and would remind me when the 'times' for doing certain things for the garden were. I haven't planted anything for several years now except for a few tomato and pepper plants but reading this has renewed my interest and may venture into planting a few more things. Thank you for the many links, memories and this thread.

housemouse
03-12-2009, 02:17 PM
Today the Moon is waning, and in Libra. So, I am baking bread today. It is supposed to take a bit longer to rise, but will bake more successfully, and keep better.

When the moon moves into Scorpio, I will be doing a major washing of the bedding, towels, stained articles, etc.

Today is a good day for airing out the comforters, quilts, and anything else that would benefit from some fresh air and sunshine.

housemouse
03-12-2009, 07:39 PM
From a Minnesota newspaper, and rest of the story is at the link below the "snip". The bolding is mine.


I would say vegetable sales are up 20 percent from last year," said Renee Shepherd of Renee's Garden, a seed company specializing in gourmet vegetables, kitchen herbs and cottage garden flowers.

"In the past, we've sold more flowers than vegetables, but that has sharply reversed itself. It's the economy, simplifying lives, food safety, a healthy way to spend quality family time together."

George Ball, chairman of the W. Atlee Burpee & Co., said his company's vegetable seed sales are also up 20 percent as of January. He pins it all on the economy.

"Forget about the perfect storm this has created the perfect hurricane in terms of sales for our business," Ball said. "Trends like locavores (people who eat food grown or produced locally), that's what I call a fashion. But this recession is a structural trend. When you take away or reduce people's income, or reduce their nest egg by 40 or 50 percent, you have almost a depression mentality. People are quite anxious."

Ball said he noticed the cost of fruits and vegetables at grocery stores remained high even after fuel prices had dropped. So his company did a cost-analysis study, and concluded that people who invest $50 in the vegetable garden on seeds and fertilizer can harvest the equivalent of $1,250 worth of groceries from a store. As a result, the company introduced "Burpee's Money Garden," a $10 seed purchase that Burpee estimates will produce more than $650 worth of vegetables.

"People talk about replacing a light bulb, insulating their window sills or wearing a sweater these efforts save a few dollars here and there but for a family of four with a good-sized vegetable garden, we're talking about saving a couple of thousand dollars," Ball said.

It's sometimes called "survival gardening." In this economy, this mind-set has made media sensations out of people like Clara Cannucciari, a 93-year-old great-grandmother from New York who remembers her own Great Depression garden as she cooks meals from the era and whose work can be seen on YouTube. (Check out her Poorman's Meal of potatoes, onions and hot dogs via her Web site, greatdepressioncooking.com.)


http://www.twincities.com/news/ci_11874788?source=rss

CourtsInSession
03-13-2009, 11:49 PM
Housemouse, would you and others be so kind to look back at my Post #61 about bay leaves. Thank you, I hope someone has the answer.

Zoe Bogart
03-14-2009, 08:28 AM
I love this post. All that and so much more. One of my clearest memories is my mother sprinkling clothing, rolling it up, putting it in the fridge, bringing it out later and ironing it. Sounds crazy but back then it was totally normal!


My mom did that, too. Can't tell you how many times she's put the clothing in the refrigerator and it stayed a few days! I'd forgotten that until you mentioned it. Thanks. :smile:

Zoe Bogart
03-14-2009, 08:41 AM
Did your mother use a pop bottle with a gadget that you put in the bottle opening that had little holes in it in order to sprinkle the clothes? OM, I remember so well my mother doing this and then rolling them up in a plastic bag and putting in the fridge. Wasn't life beautiful and so much simplier???

Oh, yes, my mother had that, too. The top with the holes was red in hers! I haven't seen that in YEARS!!!!

Housemouse, while I don't remember much about the starch being put into those slips, I do remember wearing one of them, which I absolutely hated. They'd pop up in the front when you sat down, so sitting like a lady with hands folded in the lap was a necessity, something I hated doing. I remember that from the late-1950s, about 1957 or 1958. I'm wearing a poofy skirted dress in my communion picture. :eek:

Cutting fingernails on Friday evenings strengthens the nails and the teeth? I supposed this doesn't mean one should cut their fingernails with the teeth, right?

Zoe Bogart
03-14-2009, 08:53 AM
http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL64/160990/21673468/357238386.jpg


Yep, that's what they looked like, although my mom's was red instead of silver-colored. The top was dark red, the stem was white, and there was a cork. Mom's was plastic!

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u234/Myrtle_Groggins/laundry_sprinkler_new_19cents.jpg

Look, this one is on ebay for $9.99 but if you look closely at the sticker, you can see the original price was 19 cents!

And check out this link for the laundry sprinkler and other nostalgic items.

http://www.jackandfriends.com/store/catalog/product_823_White_Sails_Laundry_Sprinkler.html



CourtsInSession, I have no idea about the bay leaves. Someone told me years ago to put a few pieces of dried, uncooked rice into salt shakers to keep the salt from lumping due to moisture, but I've never done it and never had a problem with my salt.

If you pour hot boiling water into a glass container (such as when making iced tea), always put a metal spoon or knife into the glass pitcher to conduct heat, preventing the glass from cracking from the sudden heat of the water.

housemouse, thanks for the article on gardening and food savings. It mentions Clara, the lady I posted links about early in this thread. She's getting to be a popular gal at 93.

CourtsInSession
03-15-2009, 12:22 AM
Thanks for your reply Aksleuth. I know to put a metal knife in anything glass before pouring boiling water in, but did not know about the rice in the salt shaker. Every summer I have the same problem with the salt getting clogged in the shaker. I prefer the doors open instead of running the air conditioner, and every year a lot of salt gets dumped out of shakers. I'm anxious to try this tip.

A site was suggested on here about a family that raises/grows 90% of their food. I was reading her site like crazy and ready to ask her a million questions. Her husband is very close to dying right now, and I will not bother her. I did notice that she had bay leaves in her sugar, flour, rice, etc. jars. Eventually I will ask her questions and get the answers, but I thought someone on this thread might know about the bay leaves. My heart goes out to her and her family.

By the way, does anyone have a good recipe for ham and bean soup. I've never made it and my husband loves it. I thought if I knew what I was doing, I'd make some and either freeze or can it for him while I'm putting my emergency food together. I'm akin to a squirrel gathering acorns at this point.

I get some rather strange looks checking out at the grocery store because I have been buying like 6 of everything. Six jars of coffee, six bags of rice, six boxes of tea bags, six of everything to start.

CourtsInSession
03-16-2009, 06:54 PM
I found an interesting site that gives you helpful/cheap hints at:

http://www.everydaycheapskate.com/

Also, I wanted to mention that I have been everywhere trying to find bars of Fels Naptha soap. Every store is out of it here, or doesn't carry it. The stores that usually carry it told me it runs $1.75 per bar. So I went serching on the computer and found a site, www.soapsgonebuy.com

Right now soapsgonebuy is having a .99 cent sale on Fels Naptha, among other items. If you purchase 7 bars, it can be shipped USPS Priority envelope for $4.95. The total is $11.88. If I were to purchase the same 7 bars in the store (if I could even find it) would run $12.25. I've already saved .37 cents and didn't have to use the gas to go buy it.

Zoe Bogart
03-18-2009, 10:33 AM
Thanks for the info about the soap, CourtsInSession. I looked for that soap and Zote soap in two stores but didn't see either one. Online ordering is getting easier and cheaper. I order lots of stuff online and have rarely been disappointed.

Here's a hint: I use nail polish remover on glue residue left by labels on bottles, or by price tags, or if glue gets on other things where it shouldn't be. Be careful though, you don't want to use it on fabric and certain types of plastic. It works wonders on glass.

That same polish remover can be used to eliminate marks make by permanent ink pens. Last week, I somehow managed put a long black mark on my white kitchen counter top. I swiped it with polish remover on a cotton ball and it disappeared.

You can kill red ants by pouring boiling water on their mounds. Be careful, they sometimes run out like crazy, so watch where you stand. I usually have to pour several pots of boiling water if the mounds are large or wide. My dad always used gasoline on them. I'm not comfortable pouring gasoline around my house, but he always swore by it, and said it drove the ants away better than the water. Well, duh! Who wouldn't run far, far away from gasoline? Except Casey Anthony, who collected it regularly. :wink:

If you have grass or weeds growing in the cracks or seams in the walkways or driveway, pour salt on top of them and it will kill the weeds. Regular table salt is cheap. Someone else said sugar kills weeds, too, but I tried it last week and the weeds are still there. Maybe I didn't put enough.

housemouse
03-18-2009, 04:23 PM
For those of you in warmer zones than I am (5), the Moon will move into Capricorn shortly.

Moon in Capricorn is supposed to be a good sign for planting potatoes. So, if you plan on planting some, tomorrow and the next day are the days to do it!

I will be starting my tomato and pepper seeds next Tuesday, the 24th. The Moon will be in Pisces, and just before the new moon in Aries.

By the way, lore has it that the new moon's entry into Aries is a very good date for giving up any bad habits you want to eliminate. Make a list, and be sure it comes from your heart. You won't be as successful if you are doing it to please someone else.

RhythmicSun
03-18-2009, 04:43 PM
Thank you housemouse! I have some potato sprouts (russet and red) ready to go, think I will plant them on Friday in celebration of the Equinox!

Also I have green and red pepper seeds ready to go, and will plant Tuesday according to the Farmer's Almanac tips.

CourtsInSession
03-18-2009, 07:31 PM
HOLY COW, AMAZING...removing stains!!

I grated up 6 of the bars of Fels Naptha to make detergent and put the extra one I bought aside. I was reading the label and it states to remove stains from clothing to wet the stain and rub the bar of FN on the stain.

Last Sunday I was making an over full electric roaster of hot sausage. I cook mine in spaghetti sauce. When I tried to stir it up a bit, I ended up with the sauce all over my peach colored top. Since the top was rather old, I just let it go until today when I had time to get to it. Instead of wetting the top, I dipped the end of the FN soap bar in water and rubbed it on the stains. (Believe me, the stains were practically covering the front of the top.) I couldn't believe when I took the top out of the washer. There was absolutely no stains to be found.

Needless to say, I am done buying laundry stain sticks at the store that cost around $3/$4 each. Try the FN, I am amazed!

butterfly1978
03-20-2009, 12:59 AM
HEy housemouse, I know this is probably not the place for this, I tried PMing you but apparently I dont know how to do that. I have not seen you around the last few days and just hope that everything is okay, I know your hubby is sick and you take care of him, just wanted you to know your in my prayers and I hope everything is okay with you.

housemouse
03-20-2009, 04:38 PM
Thanks, Butterfly. His neurologist wants him to have some intensive physical therapy, and I have been busy taking him to and from the sessions. They are working hard with exercises to try to improve his sense of balance.

Falls are the biggest problem we face. He has the "rigid" kind of Parkinson's, meaning he can't get up from a sitting position or lying down position. His legs are strong, but the muscles don't get the right message from the brain. Everyday activities take forever to complete, and I must be careful to let him do as much as he can, but also keep him from falling.

Some weeks are harder than others. The physical therapy sessions really eat into the day. It is hard to see my strong, vital, and energetic husband being taken down like this.

butterfly1978
03-20-2009, 06:04 PM
God Bless you housemouse. I am praying for you.:blowkiss:

Kat
03-21-2009, 03:19 PM
I have another tip to share with those that have skin sensitivities as my children do.

I make my own colloidal oatmeal. You take regular or quick oats and grind them until fine powdery like consistancy in food processor. It works just as well as buying name brand products.

Plus the savings:

Without coupon you can get a 18 oz. container of oats for around about 2-3 bucks. Cheaper if you shop on sale or have a coupon.

To purchase the equivalent ounces of Aveeno in the individual 1.5 oz packages, it would cost around and about 12.00-15.00.

Big savings if you use this type of soak often.

CourtsInSession
03-22-2009, 12:40 AM
I have never baked homemade bread from scratch before. I've used my bread maker and frozen bread dough, but that's it. I got real brave the other day and found this site for beginner's bread. It only makes one loaf, so if it's a flop, it's not such a big deal. Believe it or not, I baked the most perfect loaf of white bread. My family couldn't get over how good it was. I must say I was really proud of myself doing so well. If I could do it, anyone could bake bread.

http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/beginnersbread.htm

butterfly1978
03-22-2009, 01:33 AM
Another good cleanser is Baking soda. It is a GREAT exfoliater, it also helps heal the skin.

housemouse
03-22-2009, 10:34 PM
I have never baked homemade bread from scratch before. I've used my bread maker and frozen bread dough, but that's it. I got real brave the other day and found this site for beginner's bread. It only makes one loaf, so if it's a flop, it's not such a big deal. Believe it or not, I baked the most perfect loaf of white bread. My family couldn't get over how good it was. I must say I was really proud of myself doing so well. If I could do it, anyone could bake bread.

http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/beginnersbread.htm

Courts, you are on the way! Baking bread is not that hard, and is a skill we all should have tucked under our aprons! With the cost of store bread close to 4 $ a loaf, why don't we take advantage of our skills at home!

The link you posted is excellent! So I will post it again.

http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/beginnersbread.htm

Once you get the basic loaf down, you can then begin to experiment. The only exception I take to the instructions posted is that exact measuring of flour isn't that important. Humidity, age of the flour, and all kinds of variables matter more. The most important thing is to get a "feel" for a good dough, and to realize that each loaf you make will be a whole different experience.

Happy baking to you, and know that nothing makes a family happier than the smell of fresh bread baking in the oven! My first loaves of bread were not all that terrific, by the way.

My husband joked with me that I needed to be careful not to drop them on the tender feet of the babes running around, and that they would be good door-stops, but he also encouraged me to keep trying, and that they made great toast! Thanks to his jokes, and his encouragement to keep on trying, I finally make bread that is better than anything you could ever buy, even in the most upscale market. And it really isn't hard.

I still haven't mastered "ciabatta", but someday I will. Really sticky doughs totally intimidate me, because I just can't get my head around a dough that is so sticky and slack.

housemouse
03-23-2009, 10:58 PM
I am so excited about tomorrow. It is the "planting of the seeds" day, for those seeds that should sprout in 7 days.

I will be busy filling pots with seed-starting mix, putting them on heat mats, and waiting eagerly for their little heads to poke up, out of the mix.

Let's raise a happy spring prayer for the success of our seed sprouting endeavors tomorrow and the next day, and hope that we have a good garden year.

CourtsInSession
03-25-2009, 07:48 PM
Thank you Housemouse and FifthE for the encouragement. Over the weekend I got read brave and baked cinnamon bread. I kind of overdid the cinnamon (of course I didn't think the recipe used enough so used too much...lol). It's still great toasted with butter, but at least I know not to get too brave and vear from the recipe for now. I would never have tried baking bread if HM and FE hadn't convinced me that I could do it. You guys are great and my famiy loves you with all the fresh baked bread coming out of the oven. My grandmother would be so proud of me, God rest her soul.

housemouse
03-25-2009, 10:11 PM
Courts! A happy wave to you, a new fellow baker!

And, don't worry about following recipes exactly. Every time you bake bread, it will be different. The planets do that to keep us humble!

There is a very good bread baking book that I like. It is by "Brother Juniper", and will teach you everything you need to know. It is about 12 $ or so, the price of about 3 or 4 loaves of bread.

http://www.amazon.com/Brother-Junipers-Bread-Peter-Reinhart/dp/0762424907/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1238033390&sr=1-1

CourtsInSession
04-01-2009, 08:10 PM
Thanks Housemouse, I'll look into buying the book you referred to. Yesterday I made 3 1/2 dz. cinnamon rolls and iced them with cream cheese icing. Yum, yum. I just can't get over that I am doing so well at this task that I never would have tried to tackle before now.

I have been reading about bread / yeast enhancers to help preserve the fresh baked goods for about 5 days. Have you used these enhancers before? I hate the way you have a matter of hours to eat fresh baked goods before they start to get stale.

housemouse
04-09-2009, 03:55 PM
Sorry not to have answered soon, Courts.

I usually freeze bread as soon as it completely cools. And, if you slice your bread after it has completely cooled, you can freeze the slices in little zip freezer bags, and thaw only as many slices as you need.

housemouse
04-09-2009, 03:58 PM
Ok, those of you who started seeds when the moon was new, today is a very good day to pot them up, because the moon is full.

My tomato seedlings have their first set of leaves, and it is time to take them out of the seedling trays, and put them into their own little pots. Not so sure the peppers are ready, but these do not benefit from being potted up the way tomatos do, so I can wait a bit on those. Ditto the broccoli.

Pope Jean
04-10-2009, 09:00 AM
I am so glad I checked this thread! I came here to help with Haleigh, and other missing kids in the future - I had no idea resources like this were available here.

Since last November, I have had this weird feeling - the best way I can say it is that "We have to be prepared for the survival of our family". I got such a strong feeling that the world was going to change, and FAST soon. I decided that we had to start doing some things, like have a backyard garden, learn to can and pickle, things like that, in order for us to survive. It seems like a weird thing to say but the urgency was overpowering how weird I felt if that makes sense.

When I have said such things out loud in the past, I got strange looks, like I was losing my marbles. I thought maybe I am paranoid or just being silly... but the determination never left no matter how I tried to talk myself out of it.

So I have to say I am so glad I read here today and saw other views on the same issue. Wow. I feel validated now. Thank you for that.

I talked this over with my therapist (yes I am CRAZY lol), because I thought I was being paranoid and maybe developing some of the anxiety I used to have, and he looked at me and said that I was right! He said that he thinks I am more 'in tune' with the world. The strange thing is, since I started to feel that sense of urgency, I have not been afraid at all. I feel ready... for the challenges. For whatever is to come. And in a way, I am excited about it, because it feels like a new world is coming. I feel like the way we did things in the past, as each of us as an individual island, is coming to an end and we are moving more towards a community living if that makes sense. We will know our neighbors, help each other out, watch each others children, it feels GOOD that its coming.

So thank you for this! You are all awesome!:blowkiss::blowkiss::clap::clap::clap:

FifthEssence
04-22-2009, 01:01 AM
I do all the landscaping and yard work on our property. When I trim the schrubs after the full moon, I noticed they seem to retain their shape longer and don't grow as quickly.

QB.
04-22-2009, 11:04 AM
This is an interesting thread.
I also am baking bread at home, by hand.
Housemouse, you give good advice. My bread is becoming more consistent but the other day they came out heavier and not as nice. I was in a hurry , I think.

I grew up in a bakery, my mother started a homebaking business after my father died. It came to be very successful and I grew up working in that bakery. I have always baked and cooked but the breadbaking is coming to me now.

There is a pretty good site for baking bread called The Fresh Loaf. I also have learned that making my dough in the morning and sticking it in the fridge for most of the day helps develop gluten and then doesn't require as much kneading. A slow steady rise , to my surprise, has its benefits. I take it out and work it up and then place it in a warm environment for a few hours for it to rise.
I also freeze it the same day as soon as it is cool. But it doesn't last very long and only manage to get one of the loaves into the freezer. I make a really nice whole wheat molasses bread, great for sandwhiches and toast.

Lfss1995
04-24-2009, 01:42 PM
Thanks to Kat for the laundry detergent recipe. I love it.

Angelzgram
05-09-2009, 11:40 PM
Okay, housemouse, what could we be doing for our gardens (and garden-wanna-be's) in zone 4 right now?
Also, any inexpensive ideas on stopping dogs from digging up everything, everywhere in my yard? (they push through, jump over, dig under fences)
and getting rid of tent caterpillars? I'm seeing them everywhere along the road now, especially in fruit trees! my poor crabapple tree!
:waitasec:
and do we have a tick problem! we put stuff on the dogs, but the ticks drop off before they die. And even though I vacuum every day, we still find them on the rugs and sometimes the couch!
:eek:
I know chickens are great for this, but the dogs'd probably kill them, if they didn't take off first. :chicken:

I'm thankfully looking forward to lots of ideas from everyone!

RubyB
05-16-2009, 12:20 AM
Thanks to Kat for the laundry detergent recipe. I love it.

Yes, I too whipped up a batch and am extremely impressed with it! TY!

Also on the "Soaps Gone By" website I found a recipe for a cleaner for walls/floors. Using 1 gallon of water, 1/3 c. of borax, 1 tbs. of ammonia and a tsp. of dishwashing liquid. Wowzer! It does a great job on the walls and it's super cheap! I'm keeping a spray bottle full handy to attack dirty fingerprints & such on the painted surfaces that inevitably pop up.
I used it on my vinyl kitchen flooring, but was disappointed that it dulled the wax shine considerably. I'm going back to using just vinegar & water for that chore.

Zoe Bogart
06-17-2009, 08:23 PM
I've been away from this thread for a bit because I was on a 24-day road trip and prior to that, getting ready for the road trip, so I've been trying to catch up reading the threads.

One thread, which has been closed, caught my eye. Housemouse, I have to agree with you, we're in deep trouble. During my road trip, I listened to the news on the radio, and was shocked by what I was hearing. I knew sometime ago we were in big trouble but I must say, I'm a bit surprised at how fast our country (and the world in general) is taking the dive. :eek: I need to check other threads to see if this has been discussed further and if more charts have been done for the USA. This is frightening!

On a lighter note, I arrived home to see that my lettuce patch was ready for harvest. Now we have homegrown lettuce for salad! I'm so thrilled. While I was gone my daughter was watering my garden. My blackberries look great and are now darkening, so harvesting will be very soon. The figs are still growing. One of my new lemon trees has five lemons (they are usually ready for harvesting around February). Other veggies are still growing. It's been a few years since I've grown veggies and fruits and I'm quite excited. I thank you ladies here for your encouragement. It's actually fun to see these things growing in my very own gardens. Now I have to figure out how to keep things growing year round. I guess I'll have to build a greenhouse or convert my garage into one. :)

Zoe Bogart
06-17-2009, 08:46 PM
and do we have a tick problem! we put stuff on the dogs, but the ticks drop off before they die. And even though I vacuum every day, we still find them on the rugs and sometimes the couch!
:eek:


I'm thankfully looking forward to lots of ideas from everyone!



I don't know about your other problems, but we nip fleas in the bud with Suave Strawberry Essence shampoo. Yes, the people shampoo. They may have changed the name and I can't find our bottle, but any Strawberry Suave shampoo should do the trick. We've been bathing our pets in it for years and no fleas. The first sign of a flea, everybody (pets) gets a bath. We have at various times 12+ cats around here. My daughter works in an animal shelter and she's always bringing several kittens and cats here to monitor. Our pets don't have a flea problem and neither do the shelter pets.

Just bathe the pets with the shampoo and water, dry them off with a towel, and comb them to get the fleas off. Sometimes the fleas aren't quite dead, but they are stunned, so it's very easy to get them off the pet. Be sure to make sure you mash the fleas before disposal to be sure they are dead.

Don't get the shampoo in the pets' eyes. I usually wash their faces with a damp cloth that has the shampoo mixed with water on it. Then I wipe the face with a clean wet cloth.

One to three shampooings should do the trick. Just remember, every animal in your household needs to be shampooed.

You may have to use poison to get the fleas out of your house. We did this once, years ago, before we found the shampoo. Since then, we've never had to do this again. The house infestation happened when my neighbor had her house and yard sprayed because her dogs were flea infesting everything, and the fleas moved to our house and our one cat. If you must use the poison bombs in your house, make sure no humans or pets are in that home for several hours during and after the treatment. Then go in and open all the windows, turn on the vents and fans and air conditioners, and leave again for a while. You don't want to harm anyone in the process of killing the fleas.

I don't remember the last time our pets were bathed with the shampoo, and none of them wear flea collars, nor have they ever been medically treated for fleas. The shampoo always does the trick.

Makes you wonder what's in that shampoo, doesn't it?

Angelzgram
06-25-2009, 12:35 AM
I think fleas are the only bugs we don't have(knock on wood), now that it's summer again!
I am going to try this idea anyway, maybe it'll be helpful with ticks or the little biting gnats!
Thank you, and welcome back. Hope you had fun.
I hope housemouse and hubby are okay. I haven't seen her post for awhile.
I'm worried about the threat from N. Korea to "wipe out the U.S." and wondered if housemouse had done a chart recently.

FifthEssence
06-25-2009, 02:32 AM
Our Housemouse has been incredibly busy and short on free time. She'll be jumping in as things lighten up. I'm hoping she posts a couple pics of her veggie garden.
This thread is fun to read and participate in. The tips have been so useful.
Thanks dear Friends.:)

quoting Housemouse and her intro into MUNDANE Astrology:
MUNDANE ASTROLOGY is the application of astrology to world affairs and world events, taking its name from the Latin word Mundus, meaning "the World".

We have a thread dedicated to those issues and curiosities you may have including the subject of N. Korea.

Tuba recently elaborated on the current affairs. Have a look, good material over there.
post # 100
Websleuths Crime Sleuthing Community - View Single Post - Astrology - Mundane

Enjoy your visit.:book:

Curious Me
07-26-2009, 04:47 AM
Akslueth, thanks for the great Suave Strawberry Essence shampoo
Flea Remedy. Darn, I don't have any dogs or cats at the present time to try this on. Hope some other people will share their success stories.

To Housemouse and all the regulars on the Forensic Astrology Forum, just want to tell you how much I appreciate your wisdom.

Knox
07-28-2009, 11:17 PM
Okay, housemouse, what could we be doing for our gardens (and garden-wanna-be's) in zone 4 right now?
Also, any inexpensive ideas on stopping dogs from digging up everything, everywhere in my yard? (they push through, jump over, dig under fences)
and getting rid of tent caterpillars? I'm seeing them everywhere along the road now, especially in fruit trees! my poor crabapple tree!
:waitasec:
and do we have a tick problem! we put stuff on the dogs, but the ticks drop off before they die. And even though I vacuum every day, we still find them on the rugs and sometimes the couch!
:eek:
I know chickens are great for this, but the dogs'd probably kill them, if they didn't take off first. :chicken:

I'm thankfully looking forward to lots of ideas from everyone!


Angelzgram ... I personally don't have a problem with ticks at my house unless we take the dogs hiking in the scrub oak (we look them over before we get back in the truck, lol). But we do have fleas. I add cider vinegar with a titch of blackstrap molasses to their water and sprinkle brewers yeast on their food 3x week. I stopped buying Frontline a year ago and we have NO fleas. Works for ticks too, see below. I also sneak in a fish oil capsule hidden in a piece of cheese once a week, such little piggy's they WOOF it down and never notice. Thier coats are shiny and healthy, helps with shedding too.

Good luck on the digging!! :eek:



Many dog owners today are looking for all natural tick prevention for their dogs. While these owners worry about the dog's tick problem, they're also concerned about the effects the tick treatments have on their dog's digestive tract, internal organs and overall health, both short and long term. They're looking for more all natural products to alleviate the problem. Here's a guide to treating tick bites with all natural products.
Use Several All Natural Tick Prevention Products Together

When looking at the all natural tick prevention products, keep in mind that these products will most likely have to be used in combination with each other in order to provide effective coverage. A dietary solution, combined with a topical and an environmental product, provides broad-spectrum protection while avoiding the complications that introducing chemicals into the dog's system and surroundings can bring.
There are many all natural tick prevention products out on the market and that can be made at home. The following, while not an exhaustive list, can give you an idea as to what products will work best for you and your dog.
Dietary Tick Preventatives


Yeast - Brewer's Yeast comes in tablets and powder, with or without garlic. It's easiest to give Brewer's Yeast in tablet form, 1 tablet for every 10 pounds of weight. Tablets can be added to their food or tossed to the dog as treats. The tablets are chewable and dogs like the taste. The Brewer's Yeast makes the dog's blood acidic and repels both ticks and fleas.
Garlic - Garlic given as a dietary supplement makes the dog less appealing to ticks too. The smell is excreted through the skin and repels both ticks and fleas. However, garlic contain sulfoxides and disulfides, which can damage red blood cells and cause anemia in dogs. If you use garlic as your tick prevention, use it sparingly.
Apple Cider Vinegar - Apple cider vinegar adds acidity to your dog's blood, making it less appealing to ticks and fleas. Add 2 tablespoons of the apple cider vinegar to the dog's water bowl as a preventative.
Topical/External Tick Preventatives


Herbal flea/tick powder or spray - There are several herbal flea and tick powders and sprays on the market utilizing various herbal combinations to prevent ticks. Apply these powders sparingly to your dog's coat.
Herbal flea/tick collars - There are several herbal flea and tick collars on the market, but you can also make your own at home. Using a web or rope collar or even a bandana, apply several drops of essential oils (Eucalyptus, Tea Tree, Citronella, Lavender or Geranium) to the fabric and allow it to absorb. Reapply the essential oil to the collar weekly.
Citrus repellent - Cut a lemon into quarters and put into a pint jar. Cover with boiling water and let steep overnight. Put the solution in a spray bottle and spray all over the dog, especially behind the ears, around the head, at the base of the tail and in the arm pits.
Environmental Tick Preventatives


Nematodes - Beneficial nematodes are a microscopic, worm-like organism that live in soil. They feed on tick larvae so break their life cycle and kill off the parasite.
Diatomaceous earth - Diatomaceous earth is a non-toxic powder consisting of ground fossils, marine life and fresh water organisms. While non-toxic to humans and animals, this powder is lethal to ticks and fleas.
Preventing ticks doesn't need to be a chemical based treatment. There a many all natural methods of prevention so your dog can live a healthy, chemical free life.

Angelzgram
07-31-2009, 12:32 AM
:clap: WOW! a huge thank you Knox, for the great tips, esp. the home-made ones!
all of the store brands are so expensive! and none seem to work well. I love the essential oils on a bandana idea, and the lemon spray the best. My little granddaughters are always hugging and kissing the dogs, and sitting on the floor with them. I always worry about residual pesticides. And I never did convince Papa to get chickens. My daughter and I can't wait to try it out.

I found Miller Moths in the dog food in my garage, cleaned it up, and found one of their fuzzy worms in my front room yesterday! I haven't seen any in any cabinets or food, and I vacuum the floors at least every other day.
Any thoughts, anyone? :help:

Knox
03-21-2010, 10:15 PM
I was browsing organic seed catalogs today in anticipation of planting our garden. We'll plant in about three weeks. How is Housemouse? I thought of her when thinking about my garden plans.

I'm thinking with all the rain in Cali this year it's gonna be a BAD year for bugs.

butterfly1978
03-22-2010, 01:55 AM
Not sure Knox, but I miss her too, I hope she is doing well.

I can't wait to eat some fresh home grown tomatoes... MMMMM they are my favorite, or a cucumber straight from the garden, those at the store just do not taste right.

Knox
03-22-2010, 01:07 PM
Butterfly, have you ever grown Lemon Cucumbers? Look them up if not, very delicious, one of the more prolific producers in my garden every year. Homegrown Tomatoes ... my mouth waters at the thought.

butterfly1978
03-23-2010, 05:24 AM
No I haven't knox but I will definitely try them!

Zoe Bogart
03-26-2010, 01:09 AM
housemouse paid us a visit a few days ago in the Mundane World Events thread. As usual she is very busy but she's thinking of us and about world events.

Happy Gardening!

Tuba
04-04-2010, 10:42 PM
I need tips on gophers and on plant scale, which I like to call galls. Gophers completely undermined my front yard and then took on the back. I lost gardens full of flowers, lovingly planted.

Knox
04-04-2010, 11:21 PM
My sympathies Tuba. I once planted a beautiful grouping of ranunculus. Went out a day later to admire and every last one was gone. We dug around until we found their run, then put bait down the hole. Took care of the problem in that area, but they got all my bulbs in another a week later. Did the same thing, bait down the hole. Haven't had a problem in five years (knocking on wood). The bait is poison, I felt bad for the poor little Gophers, but felt worse about those Iris bulbs. My Mom brought them back to me from my Grandparent's homestead in Missouri.

What kind of plants have the scale?

Tuba
04-05-2010, 09:46 AM
Scale has attacked my in house ferns and a false aralia and even several spider plants and another hanging plant I will have to look up.

Knox
04-05-2010, 01:46 PM
Never had scale on my indoor plants, but found this article. Like the idea of a natural predator as well as oil soap mixture. If you have a greenhouse or other room in which to quarantine the infected plants, that would seem appropriate.

http://www.gardensalive.com/article.asp?ai=877&bhcd2=1270489161