1020 users online (170 members and 850 guests)  


Websleuths News


Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    6,066

    TX- Child with cerebral palsy denied First Communion

    This is sad

    As for the grandmother saying the annointing of the sick prayer is for people who are dying... I thought that was Last Rites....


    http://www.ksat.com/news/27643782/detail.html


    that because Kevin had cerebral palsy and has the mental capacity of a 6-month-old, he didn't qualify to receive his first communion.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Laguna Beach, CA
    Posts
    8,862
    I am not Catholic....but protestants have communion too, and I know my parents had us wait until we were fully able to know what it meant. (Same for baptism) I do the same with my daughter. It sounds reasonable based on the reason why.

    Did the child want it? Or did a family member want it on the child's behalf? Do you have to sign up ahead of time, or just go?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Not Of This World
    Posts
    21,642
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie09 View Post
    I am not Catholic....but protestants have communion too, and I know my parents had us wait until we were fully able to know what it meant. (Same for baptism) I do the same with my daughter. It sounds reasonable based on the reason why.

    Did the child want it? Or did a family member want it on the child's behalf? Do you have to sign up ahead of time, or just go?
    Yes, you are supposed to be able to understand what it means, rather than having it chosen for you. I might have given some leeway, here, but I understand the reason, too.

    Anointing of the sick can be for anyone who is sick, not just the dying.

    Praying for them.


    Follow me on the Twitter! @EricDiesel1972

    Deuteronomy 18:10-12 (KJV)

    10 There shall not be found among you anyone who makes his son or his daughter pass through the fire, or one who practices witchcraft, or a soothsayer, or one who interprets omens, or a sorcerer, 11 or one who conjures spells, or a medium, or a spiritist, or one who calls up the dead. 12 For all who do these things are an abomination to the Lord. (KJV)

    Follow me at my Biblical Blog: http://scripture-demystified.blogspot.com

    Baruch ha Shem Adonai.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Atlanta GA
    Posts
    7,376
    from the OP's link:

    Castro said this doesn't just make her question her pastor, it makes her question her faith.



    I think the grandmother has it backwards!

    But maybe her faith wasn't that strong to begin with if this makes her question it. Also, she clearly doesn't understand the sacraments herself. Anointing of the sick is not just for people who are dying. I've had it before surgery. You can have it multiple times in your life. (And yes, that's what used to be referred to as Last Rites.)

    How did she prepare a child for reception of the Eucharist if he has the mental capacity of a six month old? My friend who's son is autistic (and profoundly affected) had him wait until he was 10 or 11, and even then she had doubts. The priest was tremendously helpful to her in helping prepare and decide on the appropriate time.

  5. #5
    Daisyjane's Avatar
    Daisyjane is offline "All the clouds are clearing, and I think we're over the storm."
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    721
    I'm not sure what to think of this. I agree that Communion should be for believers, and that it's hard to 'believe' if you are not capable of understanding instructions in the meaning of the bread and wine. If the church has a rule that Communion is served only to those who've completed instructions in the faith, this boy's family should abide by that rule.

    But the Catholic church DOES practice infant baptism as a sacrament, with parents taking vows on behalf of the child. Some denominations do not believe in infant baptism, feeling that one should be old enough to make an educated decision about his/her own relationship with God. So I suppose this should be left up to the policymakers of the church.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    30,165
    The Wiki entry for Holy Communion in regards the mentally disabled is instructive:

    Additionally, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops stated in its Guidelines for the Celebration of the Sacraments with Persons with Disabilities (approved 1995): the criterion for reception of holy communion is the same for persons with developmental and mental disabilities as for all persons, namely, that the person be able to distinguish the Body of Christ from ordinary food, even if this recognition is evidenced through manner, gesture, or reverential silence rather than verbally. Pastors are encouraged to consult with parents, those who take the place of parents, diocesan personnel involved with disability issues, psychologists, religious educators, and other experts in making their judgment. If it is determined that a parishioner who is disabled is not ready to receive the sacrament, great care is to be taken in explaining the reasons for this decision. Cases of doubt should be resolved in favor of the right of the baptized person to receive the sacrament. The existence of a disability is not considered in and of itself as disqualifying a person from receiving the eucharist.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communi...tally_disabled
    Last edited by KateB; 06-14-2015 at 03:23 PM. Reason: repair url tag.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    12,328
    Kinda sad really, if the child can't understand what it's about. But who are we to judge if the child can or cannot understand. He is the only one that can do that. Personally, I see no harm (really - what harm can it be to bless a child so ill).

    I had to wait 14 years before my first communion (raised Lutheran). Had to go to all these bible classes 2x a week - felt like an absolute chore to a growing teen. Of course now I know why my mum did it (to keep me out of trouble) but it did leave a bad taste in my mouth regarding that faith (which I don't practice). I consider myself a Christian and not a Lutheran. If that makes any sense

    MOO

    Mel

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    5,076
    All I can comment on this " I hope the preist gave the little one a blessing has he walk in line for communion". Childern that have not made First Communion are alway blessed by most preists.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    On Battleship Hill
    Posts
    3,282
    In my experience the Catholic church is very strict on who can and cannot receive communion.
    We have to fast before communion, be in a "state of grace" (up to date with confession) and be following the doctrines of the Catholic church.

    I personally know people who are refused communion because they are perceived to have sinned in some way, a lady whom I was in hospital with was refused as she married a man who had been married previously.

    We, as 8 year olds, had to receive instruction, be questioned and recite a catechism before our first holy communion. There were no exceptions.

    I would have thought that this child's parents, as Catholics, would have been aware of this.

    I would hope that the child would routinely receive a blessing though.

    The above is my experience of being a Catholic in England, maybe things are different in the US
    England's dancing days are done...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    On Battleship Hill
    Posts
    3,282
    Roman Catholic Canonical Law CIC 913, Section 1, states that a person must be at least 7 years old and have the reasoning to understand the basic teachings of the meaning of communion. There are some children and adults that do not have the ability to understand and are therefore not eligible. This includes people with developmental disabilities or brain injuries.


    Catholic priest
    According to Roman Catholic Canonical Law CIC 914, it is the responsibility of Catholic parents, guardians and parish pastors to make sure children receive the proper preparation and learn the teachings about First Communion. They are obligated to make sure children receive the sacrament when they are deemed ready by a teacher, parent and priest.



    Read more: Requirements for Catholic First Communion | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/list_6187368_req...#ixzz1KSdxb6SI
    England's dancing days are done...


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    12,328
    Quote Originally Posted by badhorsie View Post
    In my experience the Catholic church is very strict on who can and cannot receive communion.
    We have to fast before communion, be in a "state of grace" (up to date with confession) and be following the doctrines of the Catholic church.

    I personally know people who are refused communion because they are perceived to have sinned in some way, a lady whom I was in hospital with was refused as she married a man who had been married previously.

    We, as 8 year olds, had to receive instruction, be questioned and recite a catechism before our first holy communion. There were no exceptions.

    I would have thought that this child's parents, as Catholics, would have been aware of this.

    I would hope that the child would routinely receive a blessing though.

    The above is my experience of being a Catholic in England, maybe things are different in the US
    I like to think WWJD? Would Jesus bypass this lone child without a blessing? I don't think so -- as a matter of fact, I think He would go out of his way to bless this child.

    Thus the reason I'm not so much into organized/strict religion. My DH was born/raised in the Church of England. He has very bad memories and will no longer go into any house of the Lord. Or what these so called preachers, money-grubbers call the House of the Lord.

    MOO

    Mel

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    12,328
    For any man to refuse a child is a sin (IMHO):

    Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights with whom there is no variation or shadow due to change.

    James 1:17

    Shame on those who have turned this poor child away. They will have to answer someday!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,897
    I am not a Catholic; however, I am a Christian and as such I believe that Jesus Christ is the ultimate Authority on all matters. He said in Mark Chp. 10 verses 13-14:
    "And they brought young children unto Him, that He should touch them: and His disciples rebuked those that brought them. But when Jesus saw it, He was much displeased, and said unto them, Suffer the little children to come unto Me, and forbid them not: for of such is the kingdom of God."
    I guess you could say that I don't have a dog in this fight but I believe this child should not have been turned down. JMHO
    "This Time We Get it Right!"

    "For those who believe, no proof is necessary.
    For those who don't believe, no proof is possible." Stuart Chase

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    On Battleship Hill
    Posts
    3,282
    I totally agree with WWJD and he would not tun a child away, disability or not.

    The Catholic church is full of rules and dogma, it is not a forgiving church which, in itself, is not what Jesus taught.

    BTW The cruelest people that I ever encountered as a child were the Roman Catholic nuns who taught me from age 4
    England's dancing days are done...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    883
    I don't know, though. The Church is not saying the child can't attend there or receive a blessing, are they? Communion is, in my understanding, something that has to be done with awareness by the person receiving it. I'm not Catholic, but I can't imagine this child's family were not aware of Catholic rules regarding Communion if they have been in the Church for any time at all. I personally don't take this as the Church rejecting the child, just that he doesn't have the capacity to participate in this particular ceremony.

    ETA: The Catholic Church does have a reputation for being pretty strict, so it's hard for me to believe the family didn't know this might be an issue. They might be able to find another church or priest or preacher who would let the child have Communion.
    If there is anything worse than the sandwiches, it is the sausages which sit next to them. Joyless tubes, full of gristle, floating in a sea of something hot and sad, stuck with a plastic pin in the shape of a chef’s hat: A memorial, one feels, for some chef who hated the world, and died, forgotten and alone among his cats on a back stair in Stepney. – Douglas Adams

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast


Similar Threads

  1. MI - Man with cerebral palsy attacked
    By bwt42 in forum Crimes in the News
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-02-2015, 04:46 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-14-2015, 05:58 AM
  3. Class Rallies Around Classmate With Cerebral Palsy
    By Blondie in Spokane in forum News that makes you smile!
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-04-2012, 06:32 PM
  4. GUILTY PA - Danieal Kelly, 14, disabled, starved to death, Philadelphia, 4 Aug 2006
    By White Rain in forum Recently Sentenced and Beyond
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 10-22-2011, 01:23 AM