1098 users online (236 members and 862 guests)  


The Killing Season - Websleuths

Websleuths News


Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    10,579

    OR - Louis Nemnich, 88 yr old high risk sexual predator moved to group home

    I simply do NOT understand why this man's victims wouldn't be notified of his move to a less restrictive environment. Isn't the Oregon State Hospital Forensics Unit part of Vinelink? It's surely not a perfect system but it worked for our family.

    Will the state be liable if Nemnich offends again?


    http://www.oregonlive.com/clackamasc...ecutors_s.html

    Longtime sex offender's move to Corvallis-area group home raises safety issues, say Clackamas County prosecutors

    "An 88-year-old man whose history of serious sex crimes began before the attack on Pearl Harbor was recently transferred from the state mental hospital to a Corvallis-area group home. Clackamas County prosecutors who handled the case of Louis Alfred Nemnich didn't want the repeat sex offender released from the Oregon State Hospital, but they had no say in the decision.

    "We can look at his record and know all we need to know about how dangerous he is," said Chief Deputy District Attorney Greg Horner. "Our concern is that the decision may not have prioritized public safety. We don't know what factors they considered." Police described Nemnich in 2005 as a "high-risk sexual predator" with five rape convictions in three states. His victims were listed as adult hitchhikers, prostitutes and strangers. Nemnich was first convicted of sexual assault in South Dakota in 1940 and has spent half his life in prison for violent sex crimes...."

    and

    "....Nemnich's most recent victim was not notified of his release. [Oregon Health Authority's Jane-ellen] Weidanz said, "We're not allowed to notify anyone" because of federal privacy law...."

    more at link (and photo)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,644
    Aaaaand several weeks later the local paper lets its residents know about this horrible news, which has obviously been in the works for quite awhile...

    LEWISBURG - Residents who live in the area of Ramona Lane in Lewisburg no longer let their kids play outside alone. They don't feel comfortable gardening in their backyard. They are more vigilant and sleep a little less soundly at night.

    Their reason? They are worried about a new neighbor: a man who committed sex crimes for more than 70 years - well into his 80s.

    Louis Nemnich, 88, recently moved into a residential treatment house at 7161 Ramona Lane, where he lives with two other convicted sex offenders.


    Read more: http://www.gazettetimes.com/news/loc...#ixzz1SJngvDXJ

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    10,579
    annemc--I fully understand as we have a group home for RSOs right next to one of our elementary schools here in Ashland. I have such mixed feelings about this. I have two precious 7 year old grandsons who walk and play within 100 feet of the home and there's not a single thing anyone can do as the home is well within "code". It does make me and many other community members uneasy, however.

    That said, I have a 23 year old son who is both a rape survivor and a RSO for life. Our son is DD and has no clue as to how to access the system or society. He lives under a bush and just wanders around during the day. We help him fill out forms and get to appts. but there's not much more we can do. He can't find a job or an apartment which will accept him. It worries me that he has so much time on his hands.

    My opinion is that it's actually best that RSOs who have done their time AND who meet a very scrupulous screening process have a permanent address and someone to check on them. I'd far rather have them in a place where they can be readily checked on than for them to be sleeping under bridges and bushes. That just doesn't seem safe to me.

    I'd also like to see some sort of employment possibilities but that doesn't seem to be on the horizon. I've never understood why there aren't some sort of "sheltered workshops" for RSOs where they can achieve a level of accomplishment and quality of life while still being closely watched. This is the only crime where society refuses to recognize the successful completion of a sentence. I fully understand that pedophilia is a disease that keeps raising its ugly head but if juries aren't going to lock people up for life (highly unlikely due to budgetary restraints), do we achieve anything positive by marginalizing those who have served their entire sentences and been released?

    Concerning Nemnich specifically, I have a feeling he was released due to his advanced age and not because he met a particular criteria. He strikes me as a very scary man and I doubt he's changed over the decades. I'd be worried too. As for his victims and the lack of notification, I've contacted Oregon Crime Victims United to inquire as to why Vinelink covers released prisoners but not those released from the State Hospital Forensics Unit.

    Therapy, appropriate supervision, and hard work can equal societal safety and a level of quality of life for certain RSOs....not all.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    10,579
    Either I missed it in the first article or it's new info but I did not know that Nemnich was diagnosed with dementia. That does not make me feel any better for the people on Ramona Lane. As was reported, a man left the home and had to be pulled back inside. A couple of concerns come up for me with that statement. First off, what if the attendant had been assisting another resident and hadn't seen the man leave? People with dementia are notorious for taking off and eluding LE for hours or even days. A person with dementia would probably have few inhibitions about entering a neighbor's home or exposing themselves. What would happen if Nemnich encountered a sleeping child?

    Secondly, last time I checked, attendants in residential group homes cannot restrain or forcibly move residents. They can't even give the "impression of restriction of egress". If a person requires greater supervision, a higher level of placement is sought.

    And while I admire and respect the men and women who work in residential care homes, they are underpaid and often lack appropriate training. As an example, I have a dear son who is 23. He has a 72 IQ but functions very well in society. I consider him a wonderful success, considering his hard start in life. He's married and has a lovely daughter. He's a great Dad. But there's much that he simply cannot do on his own--like drive or manage money or multi-task. His wife, who is college educated, manages those things. His job? Night manager of a care home for those with dementia. He's paid minimum wage and yet is responsible for handing out meds and keeping reports on accidents, incidents, and medical emergencies. I love the young man dearly and he has the best intentions.

    Would I trust him to manage a man such as Nemnich? Never!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    10,579
    Some excellent comments:

    http://www.kmtr.com/news/local/story...spx?p=Comments

    "....One of our neighbors knows one of the 'caregivers". She asked him what type of training he had to work there and his response was "none". Our daily fear is one of these individuals is going to get tired of the rules or have a mental breakdown and overpower the caregiver. Where does this leave the woman on this lane who's husbands are at work. Unprotected, alone at home with their children. What I wonder is the protocol of this company for a violent resident when the caregiver has no training....?"

    and

    "...all the residents at the home have come from state or private mental hospitals, primarily sex offenders. they are out of the house unescorted, going to local yard sales and we are very challenged in finding out the identities of the others that reside there...."

    more at link


    I'll accept a residential facility IF it is proven that Nemnich is no threat. That has NOT been proven however. I'd sure like to know more about his personality and his present level of functioning. And what about the care home for frail and elderly ladies on the same street? They seem like sitting ducks to me.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,644
    Yes, Missizzy - I totally get where you're coming from. I agree that with proper monitoring that RSOs (even with the high rates of recidivism) who have served their time are way better off in a structured, consistent environment than roaming around with no permanent address, as is society in general.

    Oregon's disturbing trend of "cutting costs" and lumping in criminal behavior with mental health is what is getting my goat. I've had a special interest for years in forensic psychiatry and do understand the plight of the mentally ill offenders but the lack of proper monitoring in this case is frightening.

    The lack of inhibition which comes with dementia along with the lack of supervision of these "residents" is what is especially frightening. You said it best, Missizzy - very well-thought out and eloquent post. Thanks for your insights.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    10,579
    annemc--I'm hopeful that neighbors of this group home speak out. Even if they don't succeed with getting certain residents moved, it can bring forth valuable dialogue. If community members want to take this issue up with the city council, I'd recommend that one of the current caregivers get on board. The very fact that the one attendant made it clear that he had NO training speaks volumes to me. In fact, I believe that alone is a violation of the rules. All staff members of group/care/foster/residential homes and facilities have to meet certain criteria for continuing education applicable to the setting where they work.

    If someone has photographic proof that the men are leaving the home unsupervised (such as going to garage sales or even being alone outside), that could be a very powerful tool. The media has already taken an interest. This is just the sort of issue that the media can help with. We're talking about community safety, after all.

    I understand that not every offender can be civilly committed and many must move back to the community at some point. I have no problem with a half-way house or care home (but I am thankful it's not on my street, to be honest). Where I take issue is with the lack of specialized staff training and oversight.

    I do NOT want to read that a fragile elder woman in that nearby care home or a neighbor child has been raped by a wandering resident.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    10,579
    Another article concerning how neighbors are dealing with Nemnich:

    http://www.kval.com/news/local/125606353.html

    Sex offender in Corvallis: 'It's been very unsettling'


    ""We just went from just a wonderful neighborhood to what we have now -- and it's people living in fear..."

    more at link



Similar Threads

  1. CA - San Jose girl 13, fights off sexual predator in her home *ARREST*
    By time in forum Crimes-Spotlight on Children
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-08-2015, 09:03 PM
  2. TX - 'Violent Sexual Predator' Missing from Fort Worth Home
    By los2188 in forum Crimes in the News
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-15-2015, 11:20 PM
  3. FBI High Risk Register
    By HMSHood in forum General Information & Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-22-2013, 04:57 PM
  4. At age 13, is boy a sexual predator?
    By hoppyfrog in forum Crimes-Spotlight on Children
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 10-18-2007, 01:23 PM