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  1. #1
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    Post Would you recognize the early signs of Alzheimer's?

    We know what you’re thinking: I’m too young to have Alzheimer’s. And you may very well be. But we’d also put money on the fact that Pat Summitt thought the same thing. She’s the head coach of the University of Tennessee’s women’s basketball team—and has won more games than anyone—male or female—in college hoops history. Earlier this year at age 59, she was diagnosed with early onset dementia, Alzheimer’s type.

    Rest of the article at link:

    http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/healt...imers-2572892/


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    Deuteronomy 18:10-12 (KJV)

    10 There shall not be found among you anyone who makes his son or his daughter pass through the fire, or one who practices witchcraft, or a soothsayer, or one who interprets omens, or a sorcerer, 11 or one who conjures spells, or a medium, or a spiritist, or one who calls up the dead. 12 For all who do these things are an abomination to the Lord. (KJV)

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  2. #2
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    I just read this. I shouldn't have. I know I'm a bit of a hypochondriac but lately I've had trouble remembering names; I opened the oven door...looking for trash bags and turned on the microwave without putting what I wanted to warm in it yet.

    Scary.

  3. #3
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    My dad is convinced he has dementia (he's 83) because he cannot remember what you tell him and has to ask twice. Believe me when I tell you that he is exactly the same as he has been for the past 50+ years, he does not pay attention the first time.

    Alzheimer's is a horrible disease, and IMHO.

  4. #4
    Lexiintoronto's Avatar
    Lexiintoronto is offline Behind every successful man is a woman rolling her eyes.
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    My late mother had Parkinson's with dementia. She went into late stage at around age 75, but I investigated and found she first noticed problems with her memory around the age of 40. I found she sought help for it through doctors, but then seemed to have chosen to ignore it.

    You can't stop the progression of the disease, but you can manage the symptoms. You have to exercise your body *and* your mind.

    I finished chemo late last year and still have a bit of 'chemo brain'.

    What's helping with me are games such as 'brain age', online checkers and other online tests that require thinking under the pressure of a timer.

  5. #5
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    I would recognize the signs, but I can't remember what they are.

    (My maternal grandfather died of Alzheimer's complications and my mother is in a fairly advanced stage. You'd better believe we joke about Alzheimer's in my family.)

  6. #6
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    Aug 2003
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    Armpit, AR
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Nova View Post
    I would recognize the signs, but I can't remember what they are.

    (My maternal grandfather died of Alzheimer's complications and my mother is in a fairly advanced stage. You'd better believe we joke about Alzheimer's in my family.)
    My FIL is in the early stages. I can't get his doctor to listen though. I know soon that one of us is going to have to take the big step and explain to him that he has to have someone live with him.

    Nova, we joke about it in our family too. Tom's uncle had it and his aunt (she has a special reward coming for all she put up from him) took care of him until he died, all by herself. Oh, the things she went through!
    "If at first you don't succeed, skydiving isn't for you!"

    The above post is my opinion and my opinion only. Please do not copy and past to other forums.

  7. #7
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    Jan 2010
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    My father is 79 & in the early stages... They have him on some new medication & it seems to be helping, but the Dr said that we can expect to see the meds do all they can within 18 months, then it is just a slow downhill... 8-(

  8. #8
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    I'm so sorry, Jenni and Tezi. Although she somehow manages to live by herself in an "assisted living" facility, my mother no longer knows whether she speaks to any of us or not. As you would expect, it makes maintaining a relationship impossible.

  9. #9
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    Jul 2005
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    Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizzybeth View Post
    I just read this. I shouldn't have. I know I'm a bit of a hypochondriac but lately I've had trouble remembering names; I opened the oven door...looking for trash bags and turned on the microwave without putting what I wanted to warm in it yet.

    Scary.
    Oh, I'm the same way. I'm not sure I have it but I think other people think I do. The other day I called my daughter by my dog's name. I chalk a lot of it up to a hectic job and stress but I worry myself sometimes. I'm horrible with names.

  10. #10
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    May I just interject this please?


    If you are concerned about a loved one exhibiting signs of dementia

    PLEASE take away their keys/ disable their vehicle

    We have had THREE cases in the past couple years here of dementia patients getting on the interstate going the wrong way and killing not only themselves but THREE innocent other drivers.

    I have had this discussion with my dad and step-mom - that if in my opinion they are unsafe to drive, I will make arrangements for them to go anywhere they want to go - but take away their keys. I could not live with the guilt these three surviving families have to deal with.


  11. #11
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    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by marycarney View Post
    May I just interject this please?


    If you are concerned about a loved one exhibiting signs of dementia

    PLEASE take away their keys/ disable their vehicle

    We have had THREE cases in the past couple years here of dementia patients getting on the interstate going the wrong way and killing not only themselves but THREE innocent other drivers.

    I have had this discussion with my dad and step-mom - that if in my opinion they are unsafe to drive, I will make arrangements for them to go anywhere they want to go - but take away their keys. I could not live with the guilt these three surviving families have to deal with.
    No worries, here... My Mom took away his driving privilages & keys a LONG time ago. He digs it; it's like having his own personal driver! 8-)

  12. #12
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    It's a really hard discussion to have with a parent - really hard. But I love my dad and step mom and they understand that it was all said out of love.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by marycarney View Post
    May I just interject this please?


    If you are concerned about a loved one exhibiting signs of dementia

    PLEASE take away their keys/ disable their vehicle

    We have had THREE cases in the past couple years here of dementia patients getting on the interstate going the wrong way and killing not only themselves but THREE innocent other drivers.

    I have had this discussion with my dad and step-mom - that if in my opinion they are unsafe to drive, I will make arrangements for them to go anywhere they want to go - but take away their keys. I could not live with the guilt these three surviving families have to deal with.
    My mom is 76 and got lost driving 3 miles from home on two occasions. she will not drive now. Unfortunately she lives 2500 miles from me and will not move up here with me.

    I would appreciate any advice on this subject. She is so...darn...stubborn.
    Bless the beasts and the children
    For in this world they have no voice,
    They have no choice.

    I’ve gone to look for myself. If I should return before I get back, keep me here.
    كلي

  14. #14
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    Oct 2010
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    I'm assuming she lives where you grew up? Do you have any contacts in the area where she lives?

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    My uncle and grandfather on my dad's side went completely batty, and my mother on my mom's side has no idea who any of us are anymore. I am drinking as much red wine as I can to fend off the inevitable.

    Seriously, though, I do try to be mindful of the foods that I eat with regard to whole body health, including berries, spinach, and turmeric every morning and regular intake of beans, greens, and Monterrey Bay Aquarium safe-listed seafood. I've read the research, and hopefully good choices now will help once I'm near bonkers. It's imperative to keep some humor about it when it's overtaken so many family members - if we couldn't laugh about grandma every once in a while we'd be a pretty dour bunch.

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