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The Killing Season - Websleuths

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  1. #1
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    Are WE to blame for being suspicious?

    Are we to blame……let’s think about this. The Lindbergh baby, Susan Smith, Kyron, Zahra, Haleigh Cummings and many I have missed. I think the latest is the Caylee Anthony case. All of these children looked well fed, well dressed, very well taken care of. We look at these parents and say, “no, not them, they would never hurt their precious children.” But then we find out that they did. How are we, the public, supposed to react to little children who goes missing, who dies? I don’t thing we cannot help but be suspicious to these situations. It disturbs me immensely, but it is fact. We are only human.

  2. #2
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    Not sure I understand the question. Are you asking if we are to blame for suspecting the parents?

    If so: it is the job of all men, as rational creatures, to think and reason, and to accept the conclusions of evidence irrespective of how we might wish things to be. It is our ability to THINK which allows us to survive, to provide for ourselves and our families, to recognize danger and react.

    We suspect parents, family, and friends first because, in about 90% of all cases, this is the correct answer. In this particular case we can also look at more than statistics. We can examine the facts as we know them and see that all of them, ALL of them, seem to point directly to one suspect, a suspect that the statistics also show to be the most likely culprit.

    Further, there is nothing to mitigate this. Mom, by her own admission, places her temporary pleasure ahead of the safety and welfare of her children. Again, by her own admission. She sees nothing even questionable about getting black-out drunk while leaving a sick infant alone, unwatched, and unloved. She even planned ahead to do it.

    So while she might cry and put on a show in public, we know that this is deception. As was her initial story, and the one after that, and the one after that. Just as you would be a fool to trust her with a child, you would be equally a fool to trust her to tell the truth or to behave in a responsible manner.
    DISCLAIMER: The above is my OPINION only. Unless stated otherwise, I neither claim nor imply any inside knowledge or expert opinion about any subject I happen to be discussing. The reader assumes full responsibility for any conclusions my writing might cause them to reach. Warning: may cause drowsiness, do not operate heavy machinery while reading

  3. #3
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    Jun 2011
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    I agree, even Breeanns parents were looked at as guilty by some and they had nothing to do with it. You never know how it will turn out in the end, but the players could help out alot by doing certain things. Staying cooperative with LE, stay active in the search even if it is behind the scenes and tell the truth no matter what else that my bring forward for all to see. We need to stay open minded and distance ourselves from the "if it were me i would" scenerios. We don't know how we would react unless we were in the situation.

  4. #4
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    Nov 2008
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    Of the 800,000 children that go missing each year, only about 115 of those are stereotypical kidnappings.

    That's an incredibly low percentage.

    So, no, I don't think it's my fault that when a parent says their child is kidnapped by a stranger that my thought goes immediately to the family.

    After all, if the child is not a run-a-way, then someone in the family or known to the family is most likely responsible.

    Stranger abductions as described by Deborah are very very rare. It makes perfect sense for my mind to focus on Deborah -- considering the bizarre circumstances. Add to the fact that Deborah was the last person to see Baby Lisa.

    Just my opinion.

    Mel


    800,000 children younger than 18 are missing each year, or an average of 2,000 children reported missing each day.
    200,000 children were were abducted by family members.
    58,000 children were abducted by nonfamily members, and
    115 children were the victims of “stereotypical” kidnapping. These crimes involve someone the child does not know, or knows only slightly, who holds the child overnight, transports the child 50 miles or more, kills the child, demands ransom, or intends to keep the child permanently.

    Source: http://www.missingkids.com/missingki...US&PageId=2816

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Jacy View Post
    Are we to blame……let’s think about this. The Lindbergh baby, Susan Smith, Kyron, Zahra, Haleigh Cummings and many I have missed. I think the latest is the Caylee Anthony case. All of these children looked well fed, well dressed, very well taken care of. We look at these parents and say, “no, not them, they would never hurt their precious children.” But then we find out that they did. How are we, the public, supposed to react to little children who goes missing, who dies? I don’t thing we cannot help but be suspicious to these situations. It disturbs me immensely, but it is fact. We are only human.
    BBM

    The Lindbergh baby? Charles and Ann Lindbergh were never even suspected of hurting their little boy. He was kidnapped by an intruder.

    I don't understand why the Lindbergh baby would be included in this opening post. Charles Lindbergh was an American hero to my grandparent's generation.
    .... ....... My posts are my opinion, only.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
    Of the 800,000 children that go missing each year, only about 115 of those are stereotypical kidnappings.

    That's an incredibly low percentage.

    So, no, I don't think it's my fault that when a parent says their child is kidnapped by a stranger that my thought goes immediately to the family.

    After all, if the child is not a run-a-way, then someone in the family or known to the family is most likely responsible.

    Stranger abductions as described by Deborah are very very rare. It makes perfect sense for my mind to focus on Deborah -- considering the bizarre circumstances. Add to the fact that Deborah was the last person to see Baby Lisa.

    Just my opinion.

    Mel


    800,000 children younger than 18 are missing each year, or an average of 2,000 children reported missing each day.
    200,000 children were were abducted by family members.
    58,000 children were abducted by nonfamily members, and
    115 children were the victims of “stereotypical” kidnapping. These crimes involve someone the child does not know, or knows only slightly, who holds the child overnight, transports the child 50 miles or more, kills the child, demands ransom, or intends to keep the child permanently.

    Source: http://www.missingkids.com/missingki...US&PageId=2816
    Is this what this thread is about? When a child is kidnapped we always look to the parents first?

  7. #7
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    I don't really understand the topic of this thread either, but I think Chris Texas meant that we as the human race have to use the large brain we have and separate appearance from reality.

    I sense that the implication here (and I may be wrong) is that somehow we need to be less suspicious, and not ask questions that people don't want to answer. Of course, we are only speculating here on the forum - we actually have no control over anything in this case. LE is in charge, not us, one way or another.

    ETA: I don't see how any of us could be a problem to this case, since we have nothing to do with it. Most of these cases are beyond imagination and thus need no embellishment - you can't make this stuff up.

    I look at it this way - there have always been stories of human beings killing children going back to the Bible and even further, Greek Mythology. And there always will be because humans are capable of evil, and often evil things happen to the most helpless, which are children.

    Being well-fed and well-clothed is in the eye of the beholder, but not very helpful when a child disappears mysteriously from their own home. Caylee had a room full of toys and pretty things - that doesn't tell us if she was always happy, felt secure, or was never afraid. It doesn't really tell us much of anything.

    Many parents raise children all over the world who don't have nice clothes, and don't have lots of material things, but they go to bed knowing they are loved, and they never disappear. In fact, some of them have very protective parents (kudos to my own parents in heaven!)

    I think most people here love children and feel protective when one of them goes missing. Statistics are pretty clear that most of the time these are not outside kidnappings, so we can't just ignore that fact and wear blinders.

    I'm the proud mother of a new attorney!
    It's better to know some of the questions than all of the answers. ~ James Thurber
    The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good people to do nothing ~ Edmund Burke
    Why shouldn't truth be stranger than fiction? Fiction, after all, has to make sense. ~ Mark Twain

  8. #8
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    I love Suzie Q's siggy ~ "Positive thinking doesn't solve crimes, suspicion does" or something to that effect ITA with Chris's post and there is good reason to be suspicious in this case.


  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
    Of the 800,000 children that go missing each year, only about 115 of those are stereotypical kidnappings.

    That's an incredibly low percentage.

    So, no, I don't think it's my fault that when a parent says their child is kidnapped by a stranger that my thought goes immediately to the family.

    After all, if the child is not a run-a-way, then someone in the family or known to the family is most likely responsible.

    Stranger abductions as described by Deborah are very very rare. It makes perfect sense for my mind to focus on Deborah -- considering the bizarre circumstances. Add to the fact that Deborah was the last person to see Baby Lisa.

    Just my opinion.

    Mel


    800,000 children younger than 18 are missing each year, or an average of 2,000 children reported missing each day.
    200,000 children were were abducted by family members.
    58,000 children were abducted by nonfamily members, and
    115 children were the victims of “stereotypical” kidnapping. These crimes involve someone the child does not know, or knows only slightly, who holds the child overnight, transports the child 50 miles or more, kills the child, demands ransom, or intends to keep the child permanently.

    Source: http://www.missingkids.com/missingki...US&PageId=2816
    Statistics bother me....who were the other nearly 600,000 missing kids each year - where they found? Were they not missing, were they runaways? are there 600,000*15 years - some percentage on the street? That just seems like a crazy number. (Not to take away from your general point...but man....that just sticks out to me)

  10. #10
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    Feb 2007
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    And the mod is sitting right here with you trying to figure it out. LOL

    4Jacy - would you like to expand a bit on the thread title? Are we to blame for what? For being suspicious? When I read your post, I thought you were asking if we were to blame for NOT being suspicious enough - not suspecting that the well fed, clean happy baby might actually be in trouble.

    But I'm not sure, because no one else seemed to read it that way???

    Salem


  11. #11
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    I don't really understand the initial question, either, especially since those who think that a parent couldn't have harmed a missing child nowadays are few and far-between. I think most of the general public are going to question whether the parents are involved right away, and that's okay; there are many completely logical, common-sense reasons to do so.

    If there's any place where 'blame' lies, IMO, it's taking that logical suspicion and turning into a conclusion of guilt way, way, way too soon. It's one thing to suspect a parent might be involved, and another to proclaim that they are the guilty party when there's really no solid evidence to back that up. There's also a fine line between sleuthing and gossiping; more and more, it seems like the two have become one and the same. That's a disappointment to me, because I like solving mysteries (or, more accurately and more often than not, watching others solve them), but I don't like wading through mountains of innuendo to try and find the real pieces of the puzzle. So I guess I'd say we (the public) are to blame for the way we handle these cases. A better choice of words might be that we're responsible for how we look at them and how we reach our conclusions.

  12. #12
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    statistics. the case of a missing child can not be classified statistically until the case is solved. Sleuthing is not about being right or wrong about our guesses on who did it, we rely on facts to sleuth our cases.

  13. #13
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    I read the OP's question like "who can blame us for being suspicious". Maybe I'm way off base.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by IWillDare View Post
    I read the OP's question like "who can blame us for being suspicious". Maybe I'm way off base.
    No, I think you're right. Now that I reread it, I think the OP's saying something like 'we almost don't have any choice but to suspect the parents' in these cases.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadejazzkayla View Post
    statistics. the case of a missing child can not be classified statistically until the case is solved. Sleuthing is not about being right or wrong about our guesses on who did it, we rely on facts to sleuth our cases.
    Respectfully, statistics are really nothing more than an indicator of probabilities expressed mathematically.

    It is our ability to think in these terms, to apply logic and history to a problem and from this determine probable outcomes, that allows us to survive and function in the world. Every problem we face, every task or challenge from insignificant to the epic, is addressed by weighting it against the information we have available. The insignifant task (for example, a closed door) is only insignificant because YOU know the probable solution (turn the round handle thingy)-- to an infant lacking your knowlege, this completely insignificant task can only be overcome through trial and error.

    In the case of a missing child it is proper to begin by reviewing what we know are the most likely solutions. We "turn the handle" first and see if this works, only if the door is locked do we then look for a key, window, or other way in.
    DISCLAIMER: The above is my OPINION only. Unless stated otherwise, I neither claim nor imply any inside knowledge or expert opinion about any subject I happen to be discussing. The reader assumes full responsibility for any conclusions my writing might cause them to reach. Warning: may cause drowsiness, do not operate heavy machinery while reading

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