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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2,224

    Giving the American Way This Holiday Season

    As the holidays approach, the giant Asian factories are kicking into high gear to provide Americans with monstrous piles of cheaply produced goods -- merchandise that has been produced at the expense of American labor. This year will be different. This year Americans will give the gift of genuine concern for other Americans. There is no longer an excuse that, at gift giving time, nothing can be found that is produced by American hands. Yes there is!

    It's time to think outside the box, people. Who says a gift needs to fit in a shirt box, wrapped in Chinese produced wrapping paper?

    Everyone -- yes EVERYONE gets their hair cut. How about gift certificates from your local American hair salon or barber?

    Gym membership? It's appropriate for all ages who are thinking about some health improvement.

    Who wouldn't appreciate getting their car detailed? Small, American owned detail shops and car washes would love to sell you a gift certificate or a book of gift certificates.

    Are you one of those extravagant givers who think nothing of plonking down the Benjamines on a Chinese made flat-screen? Perhaps that grateful gift receiver would like his driveway sealed, or lawn mowed for the summer, or driveway plowed all winter, or games at the local golf course.

    There are a bazillion owner-run restaurants -- all offering gift certificates. And, if your intended isn't the fancy eatery sort, what about a half dozen breakfasts at the local breakfast joint. Remember, folks this isn't about big National chains -- this is about supporting your home town Americans with their financial lives on the line to keep their doors open.

    How many people couldn't use an oil change for their car, truck or motorcycle, done at a shop run by the American working guy?

    Thinking about a heartfelt gift for mom? Mom would LOVE the services of a local cleaning lady for a day.

    My computer could use a tune-up, and I KNOW I can find some young guy who is struggling to get his repair business up and running.

    OK, you were looking for something more personal. Local crafts people spin their own wool and knit them into scarves. They make jewelry, and pottery and beautiful wooden boxes.

    Plan your holiday outings at local, owner operated restaurants and leave your server a nice tip. And, how about going out to see a play or ballet at your hometown theatre.

    Musicians need love too, so find a venue showcasing local bands.

    Honestly, people, do you REALLY need to buy another ten thousand Chinese lights for the house? When you buy a five dollar string of light, about fifty cents stays in the community. If you have those kinds of bucks to burn, leave the mailman, trash guy or babysitter a nice BIG tip.

    You see,gift giving is no longer about draining American pockets so that China can build another glittering city. Gift giving is now about caring about US, encouraging American small businesses to keep plugging away to follow their dreams. And, when we care about other Americans, we care about our communities, and the benefits come back to us in ways we couldn't imagine.

    Make this the new American Holiday tradition, and keep Americans working for a better America.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    3,581
    My Dad emailed us some old pictures of Memphis landmarks as they looked in his college years and wistfully said he wished he had copies of them. I took them and had them put into a bound photo album for him. It's a gift he'll enjoy for ages and not one likely to be mass-marketed in some Asian factory with overworked and underpaid workers.

    In years past we've "adopted" a zoo animal for him. He loved that. Nope, don't have to resort to cheap trinkets for gifts. And thanks for the suggestions. I'll keep them all in mind!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,684
    Not Christmas gifts but we just had to have a new roof and we made sure the shingles were made in the US and only had Americans doing the work. Then the microwave and dishwasher went out so we made sure we also bought American made products. We replaced a 27 yr old dishwasher made in Louisville Ky with a new one made in US. That old dishwasher worked for 27 years and believe it or not it never had to repaired even once. We can find and purchase American products if we research brands.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    206
    Quote Originally Posted by justthinkin View Post
    As the holidays approach, the giant Asian factories are kicking into high gear to provide Americans with monstrous piles of cheaply produced goods -- merchandise that has been produced at the expense of American labor. This year will be different. This year Americans will give the gift of genuine concern for other Americans. There is no longer an excuse that, at gift giving time, nothing can be found that is produced by American hands. Yes there is!

    It's time to think outside the box, people. Who says a gift needs to fit in a shirt box, wrapped in Chinese produced wrapping paper?

    Everyone -- yes EVERYONE gets their hair cut. How about gift certificates from your local American hair salon or barber?

    Gym membership? It's appropriate for all ages who are thinking about some health improvement.

    Who wouldn't appreciate getting their car detailed? Small, American owned detail shops and car washes would love to sell you a gift certificate or a book of gift certificates.

    Are you one of those extravagant givers who think nothing of plonking down the Benjamines on a Chinese made flat-screen? Perhaps that grateful gift receiver would like his driveway sealed, or lawn mowed for the summer, or driveway plowed all winter, or games at the local golf course.

    There are a bazillion owner-run restaurants -- all offering gift certificates. And, if your intended isn't the fancy eatery sort, what about a half dozen breakfasts at the local breakfast joint. Remember, folks this isn't about big National chains -- this is about supporting your home town Americans with their financial lives on the line to keep their doors open.

    How many people couldn't use an oil change for their car, truck or motorcycle, done at a shop run by the American working guy?

    Thinking about a heartfelt gift for mom? Mom would LOVE the services of a local cleaning lady for a day.

    My computer could use a tune-up, and I KNOW I can find some young guy who is struggling to get his repair business up and running.

    OK, you were looking for something more personal. Local crafts people spin their own wool and knit them into scarves. They make jewelry, and pottery and beautiful wooden boxes.

    Plan your holiday outings at local, owner operated restaurants and leave your server a nice tip. And, how about going out to see a play or ballet at your hometown theatre.

    Musicians need love too, so find a venue showcasing local bands.

    Honestly, people, do you REALLY need to buy another ten thousand Chinese lights for the house? When you buy a five dollar string of light, about fifty cents stays in the community. If you have those kinds of bucks to burn, leave the mailman, trash guy or babysitter a nice BIG tip.

    You see,gift giving is no longer about draining American pockets so that China can build another glittering city. Gift giving is now about caring about US, encouraging American small businesses to keep plugging away to follow their dreams. And, when we care about other Americans, we care about our communities, and the benefits come back to us in ways we couldn't imagine.

    Make this the new American Holiday tradition, and keep Americans working for a better America.
    Just clicking "thanks" was not near enough for me for your post! This is the ultimate gift-giving solutions imho but then I have spent the past few years trying to cut down on senseless spending of things that 99% of us do not even need. My most favorite gift from my hubby is a gift certificate for pedicures (I don't do fake nails and only truely enjoy the foot massage and pampering with the toes ) I exercise these gift-giving techniques with my whole family and they all seem to appreciate it so much more. I know in this material-ridden world it is difficult not to buy, buy, buy things that don't even matter....but now for the grandchildren, yes, we do still buy American girl dolls, games and gaming systems, bikes, ect. but we try so hard to shop as much American made as possible. Sadly my hubby is now working in another state 6 hours away from us because Goodyear Tires decided to shut our plant down in our hometown where he has worked for years so they can be more "productive and make more money" in Goodyear's newest plant in China....and I won't even go into the plants they have in other countries.....
    Thank you for a wonderful post full of "new ideas" that I haven't thought of but will be putting on my list of things to give this year
    You
    ~~All my posts are IMHO~~


    I can be changed by what happens to me. but I refuse to be reduced by it. ~Maya Angelou~

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    On Battleship Hill
    Posts
    3,282
    I have always tried to buy from local firms. I get a lot of pleasure from the internet but have seen bookshops, butchers, greengrocers and record shops close down due to the online shops and big conglomerates.

    We try to keep our money in the village where ever we can and support local small businesses.

    Think global, act local
    England's dancing days are done...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    9,086
    All really great ideas-- and in this economy, even the most practical gifts will be most welcome.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    3,581
    We can extend this "new method" (really the old way) of giving beyond these holidays as well. For example, I have a young friend whose wife was killed in an accident recently. They have set up a fund for him. I can't really afford to give anything of consequence to the fund. BUT what I can do is share meals with him. I have yet to learn how to cook for one, so it is nothing to split my big pots of soup, stews, chili, spaghetti, roast, etc. with this young man and his four-year-old. To me, it's a win-win: they get a healthy, home-cooked meal, and I don't have to eat the same thing for days on end (or worse...just chow down on the nearest no-so-good-for-me thing within reach instead of cooking).