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  1. #1
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    Dallas schoolgirls excluded from 'Red Tails' movie screening

    What year is this?

    Schoolgirls excluded from Dallas movie screening (AP)
    DALLAS (AP) — When 5,700 fifth-grade boys in Dallas' public schools recently went to see a movie about black fighter pilots in World War II, the girls stayed in school and saw a different movie instead.
    ---
    [Dallas Independent School district spokesman] Jon Dahlander told The Dallas Morning News that leaders of the district also thought boys would enjoy the movie more than girls.

    "Red Tails" tells the story of the Tuskegee Airmen, the legendary pilots during World War II who become the first black aviators to serve in the U.S. military.
    ---
    Some female students were shown a different movie instead: "Akeelah and the Bee," about an 11-year-old girl who competes in a national spelling bee.
    ---
    Any surviving pilots weigh in on this yet?
    Herbert Carter, who flew 77 missions in World War II with only one crash landing, said he was "almost speechless."

    "I've heard everything else," said Carter, 94, in a phone interview. "This is the first time I've heard that it was unfit for female students."

    Carter's wife of nearly 70 years, Mildred, who died in October, became the first black woman in Alabama to hold a private pilot's license, their son Kurt Carter said.
    ---
    "My wife would turn flip flops," Herbert Carter said. "She thought that all human beings were equal, regardless of sex, race, creed or color. She would take great offense to young women being denied this (opportunity)."
    ---
    more at link above

  2. #2
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    I think most will see this as a slap in the face towards the girls. But it is also a slap at the boys. Were they given a chance to opt out and stay with the girls? What if they weren't interested in the movie? Would that mean anything to the school? I mean if the movie was thought to be only interesting for boys, if the boy wasn't interested in it does that mean they aren't normal boys???
    Just when I think that I have seen the most depraved things a human can do to another human, somebody posts a new story...........

    Why is it that when a custodial parent fails to provide for a child it is called neglect and is a criminal matter. But when a non custodial parent fails to provide it is called failure to support and is a civil matter?


    "Just when the caterpillar thought its world was over, it became a butterfly" ~ Michelle Knight

  3. #3
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    Bad all around. Poor form, school.
    “Justice cannot be for one side alone, but must be for both.” - Eleanor Roosevelt


    In no way should any of my statements be construed as legal opinion or advice. While I am a lawyer, I am not a verified poster here at WS. The above statement(s) are an expression of my personal opinion, for entertainment purposes only, and copyright.

  4. #4
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    I really, really hate to hear things like this going on in schools. Enforcing gender stereotypes can be so damaging to both boys and girls. My one daughter is not the girly type, but has a huge interest in civil rights, so she would have enjoyed a flick about the Tuskegee airmen. My oldest son is a peacenik like his mom who detests anything about war, and probably would have been unwilling to watch a movie having anything to do with it, even peripherally. My youngest son, who is a preschooler, loves his Legos, but also loves flower arranging (he picks out our fresh flowers every week, and arranges them in the vases at home), and told me today that when he is old enough he wants to drive a gold car with pink hearts on it (which was the most absolutely adorable thing I've heard in a while lol). I'm afraid for him when gets to older grades that teachers or other kids are going to gender shame him right out of the things he enjoys doing and imagining.

    So a big BOO from me for this school district.
    “Peace is not the product of terror or fear. Peace is not the silence of cemeteries. Peace is not the silent result of violent repression. Peace is the generous, tranquil contribution of all to the good of all." -Abp Oscar Romero

  5. #5
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    Sounds like this is a big hoopla over nothing. There wasn't room for all of the students at the theater, so the school had to decide to skip it or split them up.

    I'm sure someone had the idea to split them by gender to screen the movies because of the numbers, and also, how else would you decide who got to go? Someone's going to be upset no matter what you decide. (Honestly, you can't win for losing sometimes.)

    I agree that many boys wouldn't want to watch Akelah and the Bee - mine certainly didn't when it came out! And while some girls might be interested in the Tuskeegee Airmen story, I don't think it's a crazy stretch to think it might be more popular with the boys.

    There are lots of times in schools and other places where what the majority would like is how it goes. You aren't going to serve black licorice at the Valentine's Day party just because one kid loves it and never gets to have it; you're going to pick a treat that the majority like. And yes, that one kid probably hates chocolate but you can't please everyone.

    While it probably could and should have been handled differently, this isn't really about the girls being treated like they are "less than" or that the school thought they shouldn't see this movie. It's about the size of the movie theater and some people trying to make up news out of nothing on an apparently slow day, IMHO.

  6. #6
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    I very much disagree - otherwise, why split according to gender? It was poor planning all around. If the theater couldn't accommodate them, the trip shouldn't have been planned in the first place. They should have planned something for all students or none at all. Separating the group by gender, and then picking different movies based on what would appeal to that gender (which is more tired old stereotypes), IS telling girls they are less than. It isn't hoopla to point out that this is discrimination. Most gender discrimination isn't overt - its subtle, insidious things like separate pink Legos for girls and children's books with male protagonists because boys "won't read books about girls."

    If they had only sent black children to see the movie, and had the white kids stay back and watch a movie with a white protagonist, would it be hoopla to call it discriminatory? Because that's pretty much the same thing.
    “Justice cannot be for one side alone, but must be for both.” - Eleanor Roosevelt


    In no way should any of my statements be construed as legal opinion or advice. While I am a lawyer, I am not a verified poster here at WS. The above statement(s) are an expression of my personal opinion, for entertainment purposes only, and copyright.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnaTeresa View Post
    I very much disagree - otherwise, why split according to gender? It was poor planning all around. If the theater couldn't accommodate them, the trip shouldn't have been planned in the first place. They should have planned something for all students or none at all. Separating the group by gender, and then picking different movies based on what would appeal to that gender (which is more tired old stereotypes), IS telling girls they are less than. It isn't hoopla to point out that this is discrimination. Most gender discrimination isn't overt - its subtle, insidious things like separate pink Legos for girls and children's books with male protagonists because boys "won't read books about girls."

    If they had only sent black children to see the movie, and had the white kids stay back and watch a movie with a white protagonist, would it be hoopla to call it discriminatory? Because that's pretty much the same thing.

    Argh I hate the "girls" Lego series! We went to the Lego store this weekend with all four kids, and I'm happy to say that we subverted their insidious little gender stereotypical marketing scheme: my daughter went right past the pink and purple and strait to the Architecture series, and my youngest son (he of the gold car with pink hearts) went straight to the "girls'" series display, and spent a good 10 minutes checking it out, oohing and ahhing over the colors and houses (though he ultimately left the store with a trash truck - because, he says, it came with a banana and two fish with the trash barrels... )
    “Peace is not the product of terror or fear. Peace is not the silence of cemeteries. Peace is not the silent result of violent repression. Peace is the generous, tranquil contribution of all to the good of all." -Abp Oscar Romero

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnaTeresa View Post
    I very much disagree - otherwise, why split according to gender?
    As I said, because of limited seating.

    Quote Originally Posted by AnaTeresa View Post
    It was poor planning all around. If the theater couldn't accommodate them, the trip shouldn't have been planned in the first place. They should have planned something for all students or none at all.
    BBM...I already agreed with this in my post. But I think it would also be a bummer to let this opportunity go by. You can show kids that this is an important subject by taking some of them to see it on the big screen, or you can make them wait until the whole group can see it on a video at school. Either way you do it, I think there is both a good message and a poor message.

    Quote Originally Posted by AnaTeresa View Post
    Separating the group by gender, and then picking different movies based on what would appeal to that gender (which is more tired old stereotypes), IS telling girls they are less than. It isn't hoopla to point out that this is discrimination. Most gender discrimination isn't overt - its subtle, insidious things like separate pink Legos for girls and children's books with male protagonists because boys "won't read books about girls."
    This is not what happened. They wanted to take the kids to see this movie. There was only room for X kids. I'm sure they looked at the numbers (maybe by grade, certainly by gender) to see what group could fit. When they realized the boys could fit, they probably tried to think of an equally appropriate movie for the planned theme and objective (Black History Month) that the girls could see. Akeelah and the Bee is a great choice.

    I don't think acknowledging differences is making girls "less than." I think it's a fact of life. Just like there was not one single guy in the theater when I went to see Twilight, and how we saw zero females heading into a midnight showing of Thor (but boys as young as about 5 on a school night! In costumes! WTH???).

    If you had a bunch of kids and some pink legos and some blue or black legos, but not enough for either group to have all the same (and if, for some reason, everyone had to have all the same color instead of a mixture...this analogy doesn't really hold up) would you give the boys the pink just to be PC? Because that's asking for trouble. Our kids' school hands out binders randomly without considering gender or color, and the first thing all the boys do is try to find a girl to switch with them if they get a pink or even purple one. It drives them nuts because my DD isn't a pink or purple kind of girl and won't switch with them.

    Quote Originally Posted by AnaTeresa View Post
    If they had only sent black children to see the movie, and had the white kids stay back and watch a movie with a white protagonist, would it be hoopla to call it discriminatory? Because that's pretty much the same thing.
    I think it would have been equally poor planning, but less likely to happen because people are so sensitive to even the appearance of racial discrimination. I feel pretty confident that this decision was made in good faith without considering that it would be seen as discriminatory.

    Actually, I take that back; it would have been much worse and is not the same thing. Having been a teacher and raised three children of my own (both boys and girls) I know from experience that there are loose generalizations that can be made about the likes and dislikes of girls and boys. I know of no such generalization about likes and dislikes that holds true for racial differences.

    As I said, not the best plan but I don't think it's even remotely newsworthy outside this community.

  9. #9
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    Why didnt they just ask the kids beforehand which movie they wanted to watch?

    Had there been too many to choose the same movie, then the school could have had time to make arrangements to view the same movie in two separate groups.

    The probability is that half the kids would have chosen one, and half the other. Problem solved without the drama.

    Where did good old common sense go?

  10. #10
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    Wait. Why are kids going to the movies? Shouldn't they be learning to read?




    Reference: Florida: Johnny Can't Read? Mommy Gets An "F" - Websleuths Crime Sleuthing Community
    Last edited by KateB; 06-11-2015 at 11:11 PM. Reason: repair url tag.


  11. #11
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    rossva is offline George Zimmerman: Innocent until proven guilty.
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    Brilliant, absolutely brilliant post!


    Quote Originally Posted by ~n/t~ View Post
    Wait. Why are kids going to the movies? Shouldn't they be learning to read?




    Reference: Florida: Johnny Can't Read? Mommy Gets An "F" - Websleuths Crime Sleuthing Community
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  12. #12
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    If there were two movies offered, they could have given children a choice of which movie they wanted to see. As it appears, they just automatically assumed that females aren't going to be interested in Red Tails movie. Which doesn't seem right to me at all.
    Just my opinion

  13. #13
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    There wasnt a theater in Dallas big enough to hold the students?
    They couldnt screen it in two shifts?
    It is nice they were actually getting a chance to see the movie.
    History involving the 20th century is sorely lacking in most school curiculems.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnaTeresa View Post
    I very much disagree - otherwise, why split according to gender? It was poor planning all around. If the theater couldn't accommodate them, the trip shouldn't have been planned in the first place. They should have planned something for all students or none at all. Separating the group by gender, and then picking different movies based on what would appeal to that gender (which is more tired old stereotypes), IS telling girls they are less than. It isn't hoopla to point out that this is discrimination. Most gender discrimination isn't overt - its subtle, insidious things like separate pink Legos for girls and children's books with male protagonists because boys "won't read books about girls."

    If they had only sent black children to see the movie, and had the white kids stay back and watch a movie with a white protagonist, would it be hoopla to call it discriminatory? Because that's pretty much the same thing.
    Excellent points. Plus they could have had 2 showings, splitting the class by number and not sex.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by angelmom View Post
    Sounds like this is a big hoopla over nothing. There wasn't room for all of the students at the theater, so the school had to decide to skip it or split them up.

    I'm sure someone had the idea to split them by gender to screen the movies because of the numbers, and also, how else would you decide who got to go? Someone's going to be upset no matter what you decide. (Honestly, you can't win for losing sometimes.)

    I agree that many boys wouldn't want to watch Akelah and the Bee - mine certainly didn't when it came out! And while some girls might be interested in the Tuskeegee Airmen story, I don't think it's a crazy stretch to think it might be more popular with the boys.

    There are lots of times in schools and other places where what the majority would like is how it goes. You aren't going to serve black licorice at the Valentine's Day party just because one kid loves it and never gets to have it; you're going to pick a treat that the majority like. And yes, that one kid probably hates chocolate but you can't please everyone.

    While it probably could and should have been handled differently, this isn't really about the girls being treated like they are "less than" or that the school thought they shouldn't see this movie. It's about the size of the movie theater and some people trying to make up news out of nothing on an apparently slow day, IMHO.
    BBM

    Then why not choose another theatre? Take them in two groups? Choose another movie? Wait until it comes out on DVD and show it in the classroom? Do it on a sign up basis? Or teach a class instead? It just seems like there are so many other options. Gender separation just doesn't seem right.
    Just when I think that I have seen the most depraved things a human can do to another human, somebody posts a new story...........

    Why is it that when a custodial parent fails to provide for a child it is called neglect and is a criminal matter. But when a non custodial parent fails to provide it is called failure to support and is a civil matter?


    "Just when the caterpillar thought its world was over, it became a butterfly" ~ Michelle Knight

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