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  1. #1
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    AZ - Last words & prison letters of executed killer Robert Towery

    Weeping Arizona inmate put to death after he apologizes and says
    he loves his family... but his final words are 'potato, potato, potato'

    ---
    'I would like to apologize to Mark's family and friends for what I did to them. I would like to apologize to my family,' Towery said.

    'So many times in my life I went left when I should have gone right and I went right when I should have gone left. It was mistake after mistake.'

    According to the Arizona Republic, he looked at his family and began crying, before adding: 'I love my family. Potato, potato, potato.'
    ---
    Potatoes may have been on his mind after his last meal before his execution included a baked potato with sour cream.
    ---
    'Bob is gone... may God forgive them': Death row inmate's chilling diary
    describes fellow prisoner's execution... and the last hours before his own death

    In 1991, Robert Charles Towery concocted a plan: with his friend Randy Barker, he would kill a man who had lent him money in the past, and rob the man's house of its jewellery and cash.

    When the body of Mark Jones was found, a witness came forward to say he had seen the men dump Jones' car. Barker, who testified against Towery, was given 10 years. Towery was sentenced to death.

    A day after Towery's execution at the Arizona state prison in Florence, his attorney has released letters the killer wrote to him from Death Row during his last month alive.

    They give a chilling insight into the thoughts of a man locked up for 20 years - from the 'humiliating' strip searches to his first taste of orange juice in years and his first sighting of an iPhone.

    They show his affection for cellmate Robert Moormann, a killer prosecutors claimed was mentally-disabled, and who Towery saw as a gentle man who did not understand his fate.

    The letters - written and posted daily to his attorney Dale Baich - also reveal the steps he took to prepare for his death, including rehearsing his final words and the journey to his holding cell.
    ---
    more at both Daily Mail links; interesting insights at the latter

  2. #2
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    Depressing all around. I know it's not a popular opinion here, but I hate the death penalty. I hate what this man did, but I also hate that we do the same to him and so many others.

    This guy seems to have achieved at least a semblance of self-knowledge and compassion towards others (his mentally challenged cell mate, for one... and I won't even go into the issue of the DP for the mentally challenged ) in his time in jail. Even in jail he could have been able to make a positive difference in someone's life, perhaps sharing with non-lifers any insights he had gained as to bad decisions that led him to where he is, and how they could avoid the same once out. I dont know. I just know that I don't see what is achieved by killing him.

    Peace to him, his victim, both their families.
    “Peace is not the product of terror or fear. Peace is not the silence of cemeteries. Peace is not the silent result of violent repression. Peace is the generous, tranquil contribution of all to the good of all." -Abp Oscar Romero

  3. #3
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    Jun 2011
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    17,673
    I have no mercy for murderers. He deserved what he got. Hope he enjoyed the potato.

    Wish we had the DP up here in Canada. My tax dollars would be better served on finding cures for cancer and childrens diseases instead of feeding these monsters.
    Justice for Holly Bobo🎀

  4. #4
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    Jan 2008
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    This was a tough story to read as it put such a human face on a murderer.

    That said, he was a murderer. It never ceases to amaze me how afraid murderers are to die. Don't they ever think about that when they're killing their victims?

  5. #5
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    Nov 2009
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    Drugs (and alcoholism) change people. Every former addict on the "outside" of prison understands this. Rehabilitation programs involve understanding the hurts one has caused, feeling remorse, and apologizing to the victims.

    Prisoners who have murdered someone under the influence of drugs, alcohol, associations with bad people, and unresolved anger are forced by nature of being "caged" to detox. Once enough time has gone by that they return to themselves, some are TRUELY remorseful and can't believe the things they did while under the influence.

    It looks to me like this man had family that loved him and he lived to "let that in" and understand the harm he caused to so many people. They probably are beyond heartbroken that the once innocent child they knew was beyond reach in his years of pain, addiction, and turmoil that turned criminal.

    I feel sure there are lessons to take from this situation. For me, it confirms that I would be VERY aggressive at intervention if my child was heading in a bad direction. - - But most of these kids have parents who probably needed intervention themselves.

    So, yeah he killed, and yeah, he had to be caged to be stopped. I just think it is very sad all around for everyone. And I do believe that compassion and understanding the root of the problem is the only way to break this cycle.

  6. #6
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    Potato, potato, potato; that's what a Harley engine sounds like... That's my first thought when seeing this headline.

    I'm grateful that this man is now gone and can never hurt another.
    Just my, no one elses

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~n/t~ View Post
    I have no mercy for murderers. He deserved what he got. Hope he enjoyed the potato.

    Wish we had the DP up here in Canada. My tax dollars would be better served on finding cures for cancer and childrens diseases instead of feeding these monsters.
    As far as tax dollars go, we spend more on lawyers and appeals before we execute someone than we would to keep him or her in prison for life.

    And even so we make mistakes.

  8. #8
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    Nov 2011
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    For all those who are against the dp. Do you have a family member or friend that was murdered?

  9. #9
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    May 2010
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    Kansas
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    Quote Originally Posted by leanaí View Post
    For all those who are against the dp. Do you have a family member or friend that was murdered?
    Yes, I do. More than one, unfortunately.

    I have been to the place where you want an eye for an eye. You're angry, you don't care, you want them disposed of, just as they did to those we lost.

    But after studying the judicial system and the correctional system, I have learned so much.

    First and foremost, when they are put to death, it is a death designed to be painless and peaceful. Quick, not torturous, and they have so much time to plan for it. They won't suffer in their final moments the way those we lost suffered. We take comfort knowing that our animals don't suffer when we have to put them down--and yet, we relish that death row inmates are put down--it's essentially the same process. It isn't what we want for them, it isn't eye for an eye.

    Secondly, there comes a time that most inmates wish for freedom--whether that be through parole or death. To wish for death, to be gone from this world, and in be in a position that will not allow you to follow through--that is suffering. The guilty don't have to be put to death by the government, as far as I'm concerned. They just need to wish for it.

    Thirdly, as previously mentioned, there are too many human beings on death row--in other words, PEOPLE ARE NOT PERFECT. Human beings are capable of horrific things--I will not use the word "mistakes" as the loss of a life is never a "mistake"--it is NOT ok, they SHOULD be punished...BUT...speaking as a person who has most certainly made some horrible choices--how many of us have had those moments when we wish we could have a do-over? How many of us can identify at least one time when things "got out of hand" "out of control" "we didn't know what would happen"? While maybe it didn't result in the loss of life, could it have? What then?

    Four--we live in a self-serving society. Why, then, should we believe a repentant inmate? What is his motive? How can he REALLY be sorry? Why should we believe him? Can we learn anything from him? Is it so hard for us to put ourselves in his shoes just long enough to give him the benefit of the doubt--to imagine...what if this was me? What if I took a life? What would I be saying? What would I want others to believe, if nothing else--and will they believe it? Would we want an opportunity to warn others or to raise an awareness about "what could happen if..."?

    Five--unfortunately, despite our judicial system being set up to allow the murderer be acquitted rather than an innocent man hang...that's exactly what continues to happen. Too many people make other mistakes that can put them on law enforcement radar, and innocent people go to their deaths for crimes they know nothing about.

    I often hear the argument that these people were "no saints." So....burglar, underwear thief, drug dealer--take your pick--wrongly accused and convicted of murder and put to death. Is that eye for an eye?

    Maybe they were "no saints", but neither am I, neither are the loved ones I lost.

    I will say I think there is a special place in Hell for people who harm children. I do not think that inmates should be housed in "protective custody." But I also do not think they should have access to TV or radio. Maybe DVDs and CDs, but not media. JMO
    HOPING I CAN HELP
    but, what if .... ?

  10. #10
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    Without looking, can you name the victim? Funny how all the attention is on the murderer when he is executed. I could care less about his diary or his long stay on death row - the only thing that matters is he got what he deserved. My sympathy is for the victim, Mark Jones.


  11. #11
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    Ialso live In canada as some of you may have allready have figured out by my user name .I personally Am on the Fence about the DP .Never had anyone murderd in my familly which i assume would pursway me to lead towords in favor .My thought or one of is just I think we have alot to learn from these kind of people and i also agree with the drugs and alchohol It is a disease we can prolly argue on that for years but It is something I think needs to be considered when deciding the outcome .I was also told one time weather its true or not im not to sure but that is that keeping someone on death row and proceeding with the outcome is almost doubled the cost of the tax payer /us when this is the sentence but thats not fact just something i was once told. I know alot of people are gonna say ya but if u new a victom and such and your right i couldn't Imagine I just don't see what were loosing by not studying them and why they went to this exstreme DP or locking them away 24 hrs aday yes that will stop any further assaults but by not learning anything from them whats the point ..One thing i will say is that if and when i do advocate the DP It's taking the crime into consideration not if they committed the 3 things it take to qualify for the dp but one if it involves a child in any age I lean towords it also If its a 100'% for sure no dought DNA lock of the perp.
    Everything I Write Is JMHO ..

  12. #12
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    Jul 2004
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    I too am on the fence, but leaning. I am not totally against the death penalty. There are just some people who should not be permitted to live. Who would harm if they got the chance. And who would only regret it if they got caught. Serial killers, child killers, spree killers, hired hit men even some serial child molesters and rapists I have no problems with them being put down like a rabid dog.

    But I do think we go for the death penalty too easily. And then let them sit on death row for too long after they are sentenced. I would rather we sentenced fewer to death row and excuted sooner the ones who do make it there.

    I too believe that for some, the thought of death row worries them less than sitting out the rest of their lives in prison.
    Just when I think that I have seen the most depraved things a human can do to another human, somebody posts a new story...........

    Why is it that when a custodial parent fails to provide for a child it is called neglect and is a criminal matter. But when a non custodial parent fails to provide it is called failure to support and is a civil matter?


    "Just when the caterpillar thought its world was over, it became a butterfly" ~ Michelle Knight

  13. #13
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    Nov 2011
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    106
    Quote Originally Posted by hopingicanhelp View Post
    Yes, I do. More than one, unfortunately.

    I have been to the place where you want an eye for an eye. You're angry, you don't care, you want them disposed of, just as they did to those we lost.

    But after studying the judicial system and the correctional system, I have learned so much.

    First and foremost, when they are put to death, it is a death designed to be painless and peaceful. Quick, not torturous, and they have so much time to plan for it. They won't suffer in their final moments the way those we lost suffered. We take comfort knowing that our animals don't suffer when we have to put them down--and yet, we relish that death row inmates are put down--it's essentially the same process. It isn't what we want for them, it isn't eye for an eye.

    They are gone from this world, that is all that matters. I don't care if it costs more to put them down as long as they are put down. I don't care in what manner they are put down either.

    Secondly, there comes a time that most inmates wish for freedom--whether that be through parole or death. To wish for death, to be gone from this world, and in be in a position that will not allow you to follow through--that is suffering. The guilty don't have to be put to death by the government, as far as I'm concerned. They just need to wish for it.

    I don't care if they would rather be put to death then live, even though I really don't see how that is the case given how many of them try and appeal to get life in prison. The fear of dieing is very strong in people.

    Thirdly, as previously mentioned, there are too many human beings on death row--in other words, PEOPLE ARE NOT PERFECT. Human beings are capable of horrific things--I will not use the word "mistakes" as the loss of a life is never a "mistake"--it is NOT ok, they SHOULD be punished...BUT...speaking as a person who has most certainly made some horrible choices--how many of us have had those moments when we wish we could have a do-over? How many of us can identify at least one time when things "got out of hand" "out of control" "we didn't know what would happen"? While maybe it didn't result in the loss of life, could it have? What then?

    If that was the case then I would deserve to be punished in the same way I would wish for any other to be punished for doing the same crime.

    Four--we live in a self-serving society. Why, then, should we believe a repentant inmate? What is his motive? How can he REALLY be sorry? Why should we believe him? Can we learn anything from him? Is it so hard for us to put ourselves in his shoes just long enough to give him the benefit of the doubt--to imagine...what if this was me? What if I took a life? What would I be saying? What would I want others to believe, if nothing else--and will they believe it? Would we want an opportunity to warn others or to raise an awareness about "what could happen if..."?

    I really could care less what he is thinking, it won't change others from killing to learn why people kill. What if I took a life? Well then tough **** for me, I would expect no less a punishment as I wish on all who murder.

    Five--unfortunately, despite our judicial system being set up to allow the murderer be acquitted rather than an innocent man hang...that's exactly what continues to happen. Too many people make other mistakes that can put them on law enforcement radar, and innocent people go to their deaths for crimes they know nothing about.

    Can you provide a link of all these innocent people who have been put to death with in, let's say, the last 20 years?

    I often hear the argument that these people were "no saints." So....burglar, underwear thief, drug dealer--take your pick--wrongly accused and convicted of murder and put to death. Is that eye for an eye?

    If you walk the road of the criminal then that's the chance that you are willing to take.

    Maybe they were "no saints", but neither am I, neither are the loved ones I lost.

    Who said anything about people being saints?

    I will say I think there is a special place in Hell for people who harm children. I do not think that inmates should be housed in "protective custody." But I also do not think they should have access to TV or radio. Maybe DVDs and CDs, but not media. JMO
    Replied in red.

  14. #14
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    I don't think it matters whether someone has been the victim of a crime, or whether a loved one has. There is a reason we have judges and juries and trials - because we want impartial, unbiased people trying and deciding the facts of the case and the fate of the alleged perpetrator. We would not want a system that was run by crime victims, as often, emotion rules over logic and facts - which is understandable, but would not make for a fair and just system.

    For the record, I have had loved ones murdered/brutally raped and assaulted. I don't tink there was ever a time when I wished the perp dead, though others did. The process of the trial, the facts coming out publicly, stated for the record, and the sentence being handed down, were all a release, a "getting it out".

    For the others who felt differently, with the passage of time, the desire for vengeance has faded in them.

    All victims' loved ones will feel differently. I would never deny them their emotions. But at the same time, as a citizen interested in justice, I would not want them (or me, if i am personally involved) presiding over and deciding the fate of the accused.
    “Peace is not the product of terror or fear. Peace is not the silence of cemeteries. Peace is not the silent result of violent repression. Peace is the generous, tranquil contribution of all to the good of all." -Abp Oscar Romero

  15. #15
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    A bit on friend Robert Moormann. He was seeking pen pals and tells of his excellent care after suffering a heart attack in 2000.


    http://www.deathrow-usa.us/RobertMoormannAZ.htm

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