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  1. #1
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    Flight attendant's outburst delays flight

    http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/09/travel...html?hpt=hp_t2

    Flight attendant's outburst delays flight
    By Mike M. Ahlers, CNN
    updated 9:00 PM EST, Fri March 9, 2012

    Then came dueling announcements from two flight attendants, the first saying the plane had mechanical problems; the second assuring passengers everything was OK.
    Then, alarmingly, the increasingly excited flight attendant repeatedly declared over the public address system that she was no longer responsible for the safety of the plane, and that it was going to crash.
    The whole time, the plane continued rolling toward the runway....



  2. #2
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    I feel so awful for everyone involved. The passengers must have felt so trapped, and thank goodness for the passengers who were able to safely restrain her. But she must have been terrified herself. I feel bad that her episode is being broadcast nationally. When she stabilizes it will be so humiliating for her. I hope she is getting the support and compassion she'll need to recover.

  3. #3
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    And I hope after this she will accept the need to stay on her medication.

    The really scary thing is realizing how endangered people could have been. It makes me reconsider whether those with bipolar (and Borderline Personality Disorder) should be in certain professions. It also helps me understand a bit better about giving disability benefits to the bipolar afflicted.

  4. #4
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    Thank heavens she was not the PILOT! I wonder how many bipolar pilots there are... or flight controllers...or police officers, ...or...well, gee, this could go on and on.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneLove View Post
    Thank heavens she was not the PILOT! I wonder how many bipolar pilots there are... or flight controllers...or police officers, ...or...well, gee, this could go on and on.
    There are different types of bi-polar and I'm one of them. My bi-polar wasn't diagnosed until later in life. My friends in high school noticed I'd be energetic and gregarious and then change to quiet and introspective (depressed) quickly. We were too young to know about bi-polar disorder, but it makes sense now.

    Mine never got as severe as this woman's did. It seems her case is pretty severe. When I worked at the hospital, one of my co-workers was bi-polar. When she was on her meds you'd never know there was a problem. However, she'd take herself off her meds and then end up in the Psychiatric E.R.. I never saw her behavior while she was off her meds, but it had to be pretty severe.

    People with psychiatric problems taking themselves off their meds is a big problem. They get to feeling good and think they don't need them and that starts a huge problem. It's sad. The vast majority of these people with severe symptoms are just fine when they're on their meds.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
    There are different types of bi-polar and I'm one of them. My bi-polar wasn't diagnosed until later in life. My friends in high school noticed I'd be energetic and gregarious and then change to quiet and introspective (depressed) quickly. We were too young to know about bi-polar disorder, but it makes sense now.

    Mine never got as severe as this woman's did. It seems her case is pretty severe. When I worked at the hospital, one of my co-workers was bi-polar. When she was on her meds you'd never know there was a problem. However, she'd take herself off her meds and then end up in the Psychiatric E.R.. I never saw her behavior while she was off her meds, but it had to be pretty severe.

    People with psychiatric problems taking themselves off their meds is a big problem. They get to feeling good and think they don't need them and that starts a huge problem. It's sad. The vast majority of these people with severe symptoms are just fine when they're on their meds.
    Thanks, Steely, for this post and for your willingness to 'put yourself out there' and help educate folks. I would love to see more people do that. I am so glad for you that your bipolar has not been incapacitating for you.

    Many people are not so fortunate. I have a daughter-in-law that I love VERY much who has been hospitalized 4 times, sometimes unwillingly. Several years ago after the birth of their first child, she took a terrible tailspin and just couldn't pull out of it. Eventually she began to experience psychosis and her doctors decided her baby must be cared for away from her presence. Overnight (literally) I walked away from my life and moved to a house in the same state and city so I could care for my sweet grandbaby. She is now 2 &1/2.

    My dil worked hard under very tough circumstances to regain her equilibrium. She now has quite a great understanding of the syndrome (I dislike the word 'disorder'). When she is doing well, she would make a very good advocate and educator.

    As you point out so well, many stop taking meds when they are doing well (see? I'm not REALLY bipolar after all, MISDIAGNOSIS, hah) and then also stop doing the things that help maintain equilibrium. I know sleep is a HUGE issue for my dil; when she starts refusing to sleep at night we can anticipate an upcoming episode, lol. And that is something that she has the power to choose or reject, along with several other lifestyle choices.

    My son loves her very much, even though it has been EXTREMELY trying at times. Some of the great attributes are that she is extraordinarily creative, very loving, lively, and (usually) fun to be around. From watching your posts over time, I suspect you share those traits in common. I have LOVED following your posts for a looong time now.

    Anyway, thanks again. And blessings to you.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneLove View Post
    Thanks, Steely, for this post and for your willingness to 'put yourself out there' and help educate folks. I would love to see more people do that. I am so glad for you that your bipolar has not been incapacitating for you.

    Many people are not so fortunate. I have a daughter-in-law that I love VERY much who has been hospitalized 4 times, sometimes unwillingly. Several years ago after the birth of their first child, she took a terrible tailspin and just couldn't pull out of it. Eventually she began to experience psychosis and her doctors decided her baby must be cared for away from her presence. Overnight (literally) I walked away from my life and moved to a house in the same state and city so I could care for my sweet grandbaby. She is now 2 &1/2.

    My dil worked hard under very tough circumstances to regain her equilibrium. She now has quite a great understanding of the syndrome (I dislike the word 'disorder'). When she is doing well, she would make a very good advocate and educator.

    As you point out so well, many stop taking meds when they are doing well (see? I'm not REALLY bipolar after all, MISDIAGNOSIS, hah) and then also stop doing the things that help maintain equilibrium. I know sleep is a HUGE issue for my dil; when she starts refusing to sleep at night we can anticipate an upcoming episode, lol. And that is something that she has the power to choose or reject, along with several other lifestyle choices.

    My son loves her very much, even though it has been EXTREMELY trying at times. Some of the great attributes are that she is extraordinarily creative, very loving, lively, and (usually) fun to be around. From watching your posts over time, I suspect you share those traits in common. I have LOVED following your posts for a looong time now.

    Anyway, thanks again. And blessings to you.
    Thanks for the compliments. IIRC, some of the most creative writers, painters, actors and such have been bi-polar. I think there is a link between artistic talent and bi-polar diagnoses. JMO

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
    Thanks for the compliments. IIRC, some of the most creative writers, painters, actors and such have been bi-polar. I think there is a link between artistic talent and bi-polar diagnoses. JMO
    Undeniably true!!

    Also, as a retirement 'gift' to myself, I am going to acupuncture school. The ancient oriental texts from thousands of years ago identified a number of specific kinds of manic/depressive syndromes. The differentation between them is more detailed than anything I've seen in modern western medicine!! There MUST have been enough bipolar prevalence in the population over a long period of time to build this detailed a body of knowledge, along with the specific ways to treat them individually, THOUSANDS of years ago.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
    Thanks for the compliments. IIRC, some of the most creative writers, painters, actors and such have been bi-polar. I think there is a link between artistic talent and bi-polar diagnoses. JMO
    Undeniably true!!
    Also, as a retirement 'gift' to myself, I am going to acupuncture school. The ancient oriental texts from thousands of years ago identified a number of specific kinds of manic/depressive syndromes. The differentation between them is more detailed than anything I've seen in modern western medicine!! There MUST have been enough bipolar prevalence in the population over a long period of time to build this detailed a body of knowledge, along with the specific ways to treat them individually, THOUSANDS of years ago. I absolutely LOVED learning this.

  10. #10
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    Oops, can't figure out how to delete extra post from my phone. Anyone?


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneLove View Post
    Oops, can't figure out how to delete extra post from my phone. Anyone?
    It's not that big of a deal. Don't worry about it.

  12. #12
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    It's not that big of a deal. Don't worry about it.

  13. #13
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    I feel awful for everyone involved... however, I had really disturbing fit of giggles from this story? Please forgive me, but I would not have been able to fly after something like this happened? Oprah always said to listen to that voice and in this case it was screaming "GET OFF THE PLANE!!!" and that is what I would have done! I would have been off that plane so fast!!

    I was stuck in the aisle where the emergency exit was once and I was told to read the little booklet and it stated how I would be the one in charge in case of an emergency and how I would have to let everyone go down the slide before me?? I was like... ya'll need to find someone else for this job!! I even asked why they charge for these seats at all! That should be a free flight for people braver than me! I'm not brave like that and I'll admit it.

    Everytime I fly, I take Tylenol PM to knock me out for the flight and tell those around me "Do NOT wake me up if something is happening! Let me sleep through it!"
    Justice for Trayvon



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