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  1. #16
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    Dec 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by not_my_kids View Post
    Steely - It's not that hard to find child porn. I've made multiple reports on material that I wasn't looking for, but found anyway. On Facebook, through popup ads that I accidentally clicked, on Youtube, and sent directly to my email. The only way I have to protect myself is to make a report to NCMEC regarding the location and the type of material. If I didn't know enough to do that, I could end up in prison for clicking an email link.

    When it was all privately held pictures, secret videotapes, and a few deep underground magazines, then you had to look to find it. Now, anyone can find it, even if they aren't looking for it.
    I've never come across any child porn, of course I haven't looked either. If it is that easy to accidentally receive then there needs to be some more ways to determine that before a case goes to trial. Once again, I'll admit it's a very difficult issue. I just hate the idea of real offenders getting away. JMO


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  3. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    Palm Springs
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    Quote Originally Posted by impatientredhead View Post
    I suggest a more simple approach to solving this problem.
    Stop releasing child rapists into the population.
    Keep them locked up where they belong and then we can give up this charade that labeling people as "likely to reoffend" somehow protects anyone.

    Likely to rape another child, that is what the experts tell us, and then we turn them loose.... while carrying on about how much we as a society value and protect our children.
    If we adopt your approach, we need to do a better job of identifying "child rapists". An adult molesting a 10-year-old is one thing. A 19-year-old with a 15-year-old girlfriend is another (even though I don't like it).


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  5. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by not_my_kids View Post
    I agree that sentencing guidelines are crazy. There is so much in the way of technology related or assisted crime now, and our system is nearly archaic. It just can't keep up, it can't even get close. Don't even get me started on saddling people with a lifelong stigma for something that might be little more than a mistake. If my son goes out and gets drunk on his 21st birthday and moons his friend, does he really deserve the stigma of sex offender status? No. But he'd get it, more likely than not.

    I feel for the entire family of a sex offender. It's hard to be a mother or a wife, because when you are a mother of an SO, people think you caused their problems. When you are married to one, people think that you must have known. But it doesn't end there. If you're the sister of an SO, then people think you might be the same way, after all you were raised the same. When you're the daughter of a sex offender, people assume that you were sexually abused and that you share the same blood, so you might share the same sickness. I speak from experience. It literally becomes part of your identity, at least internally.
    Exactly. We had a poster here some years ago whose daughter took a leak behind a bush after an on-campus rock concert when she couldn't find an unlocked bathroom. A campus security guard saw and detained her.

    She was given a choice between a trial that might end with her being sentenced to years in prison or a plea bargain that would require her to register as an RSO for the rest of her life.

    IIRC, the poster stopped posting and we never learned what the daughter decided to do.


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  7. #19
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    Jun 2008
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    Hey, I've done stupid things online. At one point, two of my friends were going through a divorce/custody battle, and the mother of the kids involved, who is my friend on Facebook, posted a picture of her nearly 12 year old son, sitting on the couch, wearing a pair of lacy girls undies, and nothing else, with his legs spread open. I have no idea what the purpose of the picture was, or why she decided to post it to social media, but she did. Without even thinking, I took a screen shot so that I could send it to the boys father, because no matter what the reason, I thought that he deserved to know that she was putting things like that out there, as it wasn't very good parenting, and had to be embarrassing for the kid. It wasn't until after I had already saved the image that it hit me that for all rights and purposes, because the child's genitals were partially exposed, I had just downloaded and saved child porn, and was planning to distribute it (by sending it to the child's father). Of course, it was not my intention to commit multiple felonies, but through my own stupidity I did. I called my local PD and NCMEC and asked what I should do, but what if I didn't have the kind of faith in law enforcement? If I had been someone else that didn't trust the police or got freaked out when I realized what the law had to say about my actions, I might have ended up in serious trouble. For a mistake.

    Of course, I am not saying that child porn in a little thing, or that people shouldn't be prosecuted. The guy with 500 images of children being sexually tortured, no that's not a mistake. The perv with 50 videos of his daughter being molested, no that's not a mistake. But a teen with a couple pictures of pretty generic child porn? That's possible a mistake. The person that saw a disturbing image and screencapped it with the best of intentions? Mistake.

    We really need to stop over-regulating everything. We don't want people walking around peeing in the bushes, and yes, someone doing that might inadvertently be seen by a child...but the child would see the same thing, essentially, walking in on someone in a bathroom...which is not considered a crime. That person is not a sex offender. They might be a complete idiot, but not a sex offender.
    JMO. Unless there's a link, I can't prove it.


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  9. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nova View Post
    Exactly. We had a poster here some years ago whose daughter took a leak behind a bush after an on-campus rock concert when she couldn't find an unlocked bathroom. A campus security guard saw and detained her.

    She was given a choice between a trial that might end with her being sentenced to years in prison or a plea bargain that would require her to register as an RSO for the rest of her life.

    IIRC, the poster stopped posting and we never learned what the daughter decided to do.
    Good grief... I'm glad I did my boozy partying in the early 90s, or I'd have ended up in the same situation!

    Eta - all those "keggers" out in the woods, or yes, locked or far away bathrooms ... Yikes...
    “Peace is not the product of terror or fear. Peace is not the silence of cemeteries. Peace is not the silent result of violent repression. Peace is the generous, tranquil contribution of all to the good of all." -Abp Oscar Romero


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