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  1. #1
    shadowraiths's Avatar
    shadowraiths is offline LISK Liaison, Verified Forensic Psychology Specialist, infoSec Architect
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    Children's Mugshots from the 1870s




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    I tend to disappear from Websleuths from time to time.
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  2. #2
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    LOL! I just had to see what 'migshots' were!

    I think childrens mugshots are just wrong even though they were from so long ago. These are older children, but still juveniles. Odd how the mugshots are 'posed'!

    Thanks, shadowraiths!
    Thoughts and prayers for the people of Paris and all of France!

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    Seems most of the charges were from stealing food or clothing. Sad.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LaLaw2000 View Post
    LOL! I just had to see what 'migshots' were!

    I think childrens mugshots are just wrong even though they were from so long ago. These are older children, but still juveniles. Odd how the mugshots are 'posed'!

    Thanks, shadowraiths!
    Yah they look more like portraits. They even get a chair to sit on and pose.


    7 days of hard labour for stealing an iron! Love it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ada View Post
    Seems most of the charges were from stealing food or clothing. Sad.
    Yes, and there was one little girl that had stolen bed linen. That is sad also.
    Thoughts and prayers for the people of Paris and all of France!

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    I don't think it's sad at all. I bet those kids never stole again! We need some of the same punishments for the kids today. 7 days of hard labour is a good lesson.

  7. #7
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    The life of a child in Victorian era England that wasn't born to privilege was one of hunger, destitution and IMHO abject misery.

    I feel very sorry for these children and I wonder how they fared in life. I wonder what their life expectancy was and if it was shortened by their life in poverty. I would be willing to bet these children had to live in squalor. A wretched exsistence with no avenue or hope for rising in life.

    Kids in the victorian era went to work (adult jobs) as early as 7 yrs old. No education opportunites, no social programs to feed them or to help provide medical care. If their parents were unable to care for the needs they had to do what they had to do in order to survive. IMHO it's difficult to compare the children of today that commit petty crimes to these children.

    Such sad photos. JMHO

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kat View Post
    The life of a child in Victorian era England that wasn't born to privilege was one of hunger, destitution and IMHO abject misery.

    I feel very sorry for these children and I wonder how they fared in life. I wonder what their life expectancy was and if it was shortened by their life in poverty. I would be willing to bet these children had to live in squalor. A wretched exsistence with no avenue or hope for rising in life.

    Kids in the victorian era went to work (adult jobs) as early as 7 yrs old. No education opportunites, no social programs to feed them or to help provide medical care. If their parents were unable to care for the needs they had to do what they had to do in order to survive. IMHO it's difficult to compare the children of today that commit petty crimes to these children.

    Such sad photos. JMHO
    Yes but that was the norm back then and I'm sure the same happened in World War II. Families having to live in poverty and misery. My parents did but they never once stole from anyone because they knew what the consequences were. Kids today don't have those same morals. Heck, nowadays some do it for fun and "just because" they can.


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    We are going to have to agree to disagree NT I'm cool with that I hope you are too!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ~n/t~ View Post
    I don't think it's sad at all. I bet those kids never stole again! We need some of the same punishments for the kids today. 7 days of hard labour is a good lesson.
    I don't think you know what you are talking about. Nobody steals an iron or bed linen for fun.

    Until the 1860s, the British transported starving people to Australia for stealing bread. (And Australia wasn't quite the vacation destination it is today.)


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    Quote Originally Posted by Kat View Post
    The life of a child in Victorian era England that wasn't born to privilege was one of hunger, destitution and IMHO abject misery.

    I feel very sorry for these children and I wonder how they fared in life. I wonder what their life expectancy was and if it was shortened by their life in poverty. I would be willing to bet these children had to live in squalor. A wretched exsistence with no avenue or hope for rising in life.

    Kids in the victorian era went to work (adult jobs) as early as 7 yrs old. No education opportunites, no social programs to feed them or to help provide medical care. If their parents were unable to care for the needs they had to do what they had to do in order to survive. IMHO it's difficult to compare the children of today that commit petty crimes to these children.

    Such sad photos. JMHO
    I can't find any figures calculated according to social class, but the life expectancy of the very poor was probably less than 40.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ~n/t~ View Post
    Yes but that was the norm back then and I'm sure the same happened in World War II. Families having to live in poverty and misery. My parents did but they never once stole from anyone because they knew what the consequences were. Kids today don't have those same morals. Heck, nowadays some do it for fun and "just because" they can.

    You have your decades confused. Jobs were plentiful during WWII (for the USA, 1941-45). Those (male and female) who were not serving actively in the armed forces were needed to build planes, tanks, bombs, etc.

    It was the early 1930s when the combination of a worldwide depression and the ecological disaster of the "Dust Bowl" reduced so many people to abject poverty. Even by the late 1930s, government programs insured that almost everyone had the necessities.

    I'm nearly 60 and my parents were 9 when WWII started. Unless you are nearly 80, I doubt your parents had to support themselves during the worst of the Great Depression.

    But how do you know your parents never stole out of need? Because they told you so? What would you expect them to say?

  13. #13
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    justbeachy is offline "It's good to see me, isn't it? No need to respond; that was rhetorical."
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~n/t~ View Post
    Yah they look more like portraits. They even get a chair to sit on and pose.


    7 days of hard labour for stealing an iron! Love it!
    BBM

    I read that as "7 years of hard labour..." instead of 7 days. 7 years for stealing iron??? These people are hard-core!! LOL

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    Having done a degree in social history, I believe that stealing was a survival tool for a lot of these children. We cannot imagine the deprivation that they suffered and most of them had no hope, no future... To live beyond the age of 5 was an achievement

    From this link

    Life expectancy

    1840 London’s Whitechapel District = (average rates)
    Upper class =45 years
    Tradesmen = 27 years
    Laborers & servants = 22 years

    Henry Mayhew's contemporaneous works are an eyeopener
    Last edited by badhorsie; 06-27-2012 at 05:42 PM.
    England's dancing days are done...

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    Quote Originally Posted by justbeachy View Post
    BBM

    I read that as "7 years of hard labour..." instead of 7 days. 7 years for stealing iron??? These people are hard-core!! LOL
    That was the relatively "liberal" 1870s. Hard labor or transportation to Australia for 7 or more years for stealing an iron would not surprise me for 1770.

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