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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    In heels
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    27,889

    Middle Schools Career Day speaker touts merits of stripping, large breasts

    Students at a Palo Alto middle school learned more than school officials ever expected when a recent "career day" speaker extolled the merits of stripping and expounded on the financial benefits of a larger bust.

    The hubbub began Tuesday at Jane Lathrop Stanford Middle School's third annual career day when a student asked Foster City salesman William Fried to explain why he listed "exotic dancer" and "stripper" on a handout of potential careers. Fried, who spoke to about 45 eighth-grade students during two separate 55-minute sessions, spent about a minute explaining that the profession is viable and potentially lucrative for those blessed with the physique and talent for the job.

    According to Fried and students who attended the talk, Fried told one group of about 16 students that strippers can earn as much as $250,000 a year and that a larger bust -- whether natural or augmented -- has a direct relationship to a dancer's salary.

    He told the students, "For every two inches up there, it's another $50, 000," according to Jason Garcia, 14.

    As word of the remarks spread among students and parents, school officials found themselves forced to answer why a previously successful program had come to address a rather adult topic. While administrators said only two parents had formally complained about the presentation, other parents reached Thursday said the references to stripping did not belong at school.

    "I think it's definitely inappropriate," said Angela Craig, 47, the mother of an eighth-grader. "I think the kids have pretty malleable minds and are influenced highly by what an adult says. They don't need to hear about this from someone the school sanctioned."

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Denver CO
    Posts
    797
    That line of work sounds like what a counselor would be telling students that had dropped out of school.
    This is my opinion, and change is good.