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  1. #1
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    Irish government oversaw Magdalene Laundries which exploited "fallen women"

    Report: Ireland oversaw harsh Catholic laundries (AP)
    DUBLIN (AP) -- Ireland's government oversaw workhouses run by Catholic nuns that once held thousands of women and teenage girls in unpaid labor, often against their will, a fact-finding report concluded Tuesday, establishing state involvement in the country's infamous Magdalene Laundries for the first time.

    But Prime Minister Enda Kenny stopped short of making any official apology for the decades of harsh treatment documented in 10 Magdalene Laundries, the last of which closed in 1996. He emphasized that the more than 1,000-page report offered a nuanced view of life in the laundries far less stark or one-sided than has been depicted on stage and in film.

    Kenny rejected activists' claims of laundry conditions akin to prison and slavery, and confined his statement of regret to the longtime popular view in Ireland that most residents of the Magdalene Laundries had been branded as "fallen women," a euphemism for prostitutes.
    ---
    much, much more at link above

  2. #2
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    I can't think of its name right now, but I recently saw a movie about these laundries and the poor women who were forced into shame and servitude. Yet another reason I am proud to be an EX- Catholic!! JMO.
    George Eliot: "We constantly ask for God's mercy while showing none ourselves..."

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by annmarie62 View Post
    I can't think of its name right now, but I recently saw a movie about these laundries and the poor women who were forced into shame and servitude. Yet another reason I am proud to be an EX- Catholic!! JMO.
    Quite possibly The Magdalene Sisters (Wiki), from 2002.

  4. #4
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    I've often noticed the Irish seem to take their religion one step further than most. I wonder why.

    If you're Irish, I don't mean to pick on you, no slight intended, just something I, personally, have noticed throughout the years.

  5. #5
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    This can be what happens when one religion, any religion, dominates state policy.

  6. #6
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    Daily Mail article, with various pictures, sidebar, etc. etc.

    Ireland finally says sorry to the 10,000 'Magdalene Sister slaves'
    of its Catholic workhouses who were locked up and brutalised by nuns

    • 10,000 young Irish girls were sent to the laundries between 1922 and 1996
    • Taoiseach Enda Kenny expresses sympathy for survivors and their families
    • Survivors reject apology and demand full admission from state and church
    • It follows a 10 year campaign for an apology and compensation scheme

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trident View Post
    I've often noticed the Irish seem to take their religion one step further than most. I wonder why.

    If you're Irish, I don't mean to pick on you, no slight intended, just something I, personally, have noticed throughout the years.
    Trident, therre is a theory that the Irish Catholic church (and as a result, the Ameican Catholic Church, which has always been heavily populated by Irish immigrants and Irish priests) was heavily influenced by the heresy of Jansenism, which arose in France. Irish priests were, in earlier centuries, largely educated in France when, because of English oppression, they were unable to be educated in Ireland.

    Anyway, the heresy of Jansenism is basically Calvinism in Catholic clothing. A heavy emphasis on god's justice rather than mercy; Heavy on the predestination; heavy on original sin and the inherent "wickedness" of man; heavy influence on not being able to do much to atone for sins. Jansenism was condemned and ruled a heresy by the church, but of course it's influence was already passed on. St Louis de Montfort, I think, a French saint, wrote against Jansenism and its influence at the time.

    Anyway, so the theory goes that these Irish priests took their Jansenist-influenced theology home to Ireland with them, and the Irish church became much more rigorist as a result. Years down the line, when catholic immigrants were coming to America, they brought this with them, and along with the laity we had a huge influx of Irish priests as well.

    Parts of the German church are said to have been influenced by Jansenism as well, and similarly brought this flavor of Catholicism to the US with them.

    It's also said to be why you see a fairly big difference between Mass at say, a Hispanic, Portuguese, or French church, and one at an Irish church. Irish church masses here in the US tend to be short, no music, very bare bones. My dad always called it the working-man's mass, because you were in and out in 20 minutes, and no touchy feely stuff. .

    Anyway, it's an interesting theory, you can google up Jansenism and jansenism in the Irish church for some more reading.
    “Peace is not the product of terror or fear. Peace is not the silence of cemeteries. Peace is not the silent result of violent repression. Peace is the generous, tranquil contribution of all to the good of all." -Abp Oscar Romero



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