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  1. #1
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    Teachers REFUSE To Give Homework

    Teachers are refusing to give homework as a form of protest because they've gone two years with no pay raises so they now will not do any work thats not within work hours!!!!! Science fairs and other extra activities have been cancled because of this!!!
    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...ap/no_homework

    UN-FREAKING-BELIVABLE!!!!!!!!
    Id love to start ranting about school vouchers solving issues like this but that would get this kicked to the PP forum wont it????
    The saints are the sinners who keep trying...

  2. #2
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    Dec 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by messiecake
    Teachers are refusing to give homework as a form of protest because they've gone two years with no pay raises so they now will not do any work thats not within work hours!!!!! Science fairs and other extra activities have been cancled because of this!!!
    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...ap/no_homework

    UN-FREAKING-BELIVABLE!!!!!!!!
    Id love to start ranting about school vouchers solving issues like this but that would get this kicked to the PP forum wont it????
    My mom, mother-in-law and my good friend are all school teachers. You would not believe the amount of work they bring home with them. (Brought home, in the case of my mom and mil; they've retired now.) Sometimes I think there is as much work after hours as there is during school hours! And many communities pay their teachers a very, very low salary. A good solution is to pay teachers a living wage that reflects their importance to our society. Pass laws that allow bad teachers to be weeded out, even if they are tenured. Then pamper the ones that meet and exceed our expectations.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by kgeaux
    My mom, mother-in-law and my good friend are all school teachers. You would not believe the amount of work they bring home with them. (Brought home, in the case of my mom and mil; they've retired now.) Sometimes I think there is as much work after hours as there is during school hours! And many communities pay their teachers a very, very low salary. A good solution is to pay teachers a living wage that reflects their importance to our society. Pass laws that allow bad teachers to be weeded out, even if they are tenured. Then pamper the ones that meet and exceed our expectations.
    I agree with that 100% *but* I think these teachers (and I can only assume their union) are going about this the wrong way,imo.I feel bad for the parents who do not have the option of sending their children elsewhere.


    Teachers,Police Officers,Fire Fighters and the Military are some of the vital occupations whose importance is not reflected by their salaries.

    Our society feels actors and "professional" atheletes deserve millions while in some districts the starting salary for a teacher is $18,000 a year and a police officer is less!

    Priorties people! Priorties!
    The saints are the sinners who keep trying...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    Its the poor kids who are going to be hurt the most by this. Eventually the teachers will get their raise or they will leave and go elsewhere. In the meantime, the kids aren't getting the education they deserve. But they all probably think its great not to have homework.

  5. #5
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    Aug 2003
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    Tybee Island,GA
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    The 2002-03 average teacher salary was $45,771, up 3.3 percent from the previous year, and average beginning teacher salaries rose 3.2 percent to $29,564


    Thats not a bad gig for a 9 month work year with spring breaks, winter breaks and all National Holidays off.
    Welcome to the World Baby Caleb!!!

  6. #6
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    Aug 2003
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    7,189
    Quote Originally Posted by kgeaux
    My mom, mother-in-law and my good friend are all school teachers. You would not believe the amount of work they bring home with them. (Brought home, in the case of my mom and mil; they've retired now.) Sometimes I think there is as much work after hours as there is during school hours! And many communities pay their teachers a very, very low salary. A good solution is to pay teachers a living wage that reflects their importance to our society. Pass laws that allow bad teachers to be weeded out, even if they are tenured. Then pamper the ones that meet and exceed our expectations.
    I had a lot of teachers in my family. I can remember going over to my grandmother's house to help her grade papers over the weekends with my cousin. You would be amazed at how much of their own money they shell out for their students and classrooms.

  7. #7
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    Aug 2003
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    Tybee Island,GA
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    My daughter in law and several friends are teachers. It is a difficult, stressful job but they love the summers off, and the mid year vacations, continued educational benefits etc. The most complaints I hear are not about the pay or hours or benefits but disatisfaction with district policies and parents not taking responsibility for their children.
    Welcome to the World Baby Caleb!!!

  8. #8
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    Aug 2003
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    New Mexico
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    We have quite a few teachers who drive Hummers, so they must be doing fairly well income wise. I do understand there is a bit of "outside" work involved in teaching, but honestly, this is true of so many professions. I know very few folks that dont take their work home with them at least 3 or 4 nights a week. It's what we, as Americans, have became. Most of us dont use the vacation we earn, we put in far more hours than we are paid to do etc. It's as if work is who we are, so we pour everything into it. I couldnt tell you the last time my husband worked a 40 hour week, nor could I tell you the last holiday he wasnt at work, yet there is no overtime pay, and we havent taken a vacation in 7 years because he simply cant get the time off.

  9. #9
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    My son is a Fireman and makes considerabe less money then a teacher. He works 24 hour shifts 12 months a year for 12 vacation days. During hurricanes and other disasters is held to a no evacuation order and can be ordered to remain on duty for days if not weeks. Buys and maintains his uniforms etc. Oh ya and he risks his life putting out fires .

    The only thing I ever hear him complain about is the high carb high fat food his co-workers prefer to cook and eat at the station.
    Welcome to the World Baby Caleb!!!

  10. #10
    tennessee is offline Blew out my flipflop. Stepped on a pop top . . .
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    Nov 2004
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    My husband works 60 hours or more every week. He doesn't get paid overtime. He is on call 24/7. His cell goes on every vacation, out to every meal. If a machine breaks down at 3am his customers do not hesitate to call him. (Yes, one even called about paper towels at that time.) He makes about the same pay rate as a teacher or police officer in our area. Oh yeah, he doesn't receive tenure. If his numbers drop, he gets fired.

    His job is no less important to our family than that of our police, teacher, fireman or senator. Just because someone is in a civil service position doesn't mean they should automatically receive higher pay.


  11. #11
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    Yup. My son works a 2nd construction job on his off days to make a decent life for his family.

    As I said above teaching is a job that requires showing up 9 months out of the year and that shoudl be considered when averaging salaries.
    Welcome to the World Baby Caleb!!!

  12. #12
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    Aug 2003
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    Denver CO
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    problem

    Quote Originally Posted by kgeaux
    Pass laws that allow bad teachers to be weeded out, even if they are tenured. Then pamper the ones that meet and exceed our expectations.
    Easier said than done. As professionals who have seniority or tenure, it might be difficult to fire someone based on subjective appraisal. In my experience, there were too few teachers who exceeded expectations. Maybe 10% would be here, and maybe the bottom 10% in the other catagory.
    This is my opinion, and change is good.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tybee204
    Yup.
    As I said above teaching is a job that requires showing up 9 months out of the year and that shoudl be considered when averaging salaries.
    My mother was an elementary school teacher. She always complained when she had to bring work home to grade or plan out. She considered teaching to be strewssful, and thus shorter days wwere needed. At one point I pointed out that she got many vacations and shorter hours than another degreeed job, but she maintained that the extra strewss justified it. It looked like a pretty good deal to me.
    This is my opinion, and change is good.

  14. #14
    Well, here's my opinion, just because we home school our children some years depending on what teacher they get, so I know how hard it is to teach.

    A) Most kids don't need that homework. For the ones that do, half the time the parents end up doing as much of it as the child does. My pet peeve is that my child had no idea what she was supposed to be doing on the homework. Did the teacher not teach her anything at school, or does she need to be taught for another hour or two after she gets home?

    B)The district assumes the teacher puts in an 8 hour day, so the teacher can either sit in the classroom and correct the papers, or take the papers home and correct them. The time at home is still considered "at work". Teachers don't just work the 6.5 hours the kids are in school. Or they aren't supposed to, anyway.

    C) I don't know what the teachers are doing in school, but it isn't teaching, at least not at our school. 3/4 of the way into the school year I am informed my son is barely at grade level for reading. (kinder) Two days with flash cards at home and he's not got any more problems. 2+2=is no one teaching him to read at school?

    Out of five classrooms for my two children, my kids have had one outstanding teacher, and she was the one who refused to do the same things the other teachers did. I'd have some sympathy if I saw some quality among the teachers.
    Just the facts, Ma'am.

  15. #15
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    Apr 2004
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    Florida
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    We send our children to private school to circumvent all these problems.
    Financially its a HUGE scarifice(Im an at home with 4 kids and Mr.Cake is an Army Sgt.-we're not rolling in dough..........ANOTHER REASON TO SUPPORT VOUCHERS!!!) even with the aid we get from our Diocise its a hardship but its just worth it in so many ways .

    Washington will continue to shovel money into a system so broke its beyond repair and then the politicians,whose children all attend private school,will continue to fight vouchers.Its a vicious cycle and children are the victims.



    BTW DoD schools are just as bad as public schools! YOU DONT EVEN NEED A TEACHING CERTIFICATE TO TEACH!!!! I have horror stories you wouldnt belive. ............but thats a whole 'other story!!
    The saints are the sinners who keep trying...

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