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  1. #1
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    CVS employees must reveal body weight or pay higher premiums

    http://www.wafb.com/story/21748962/c...rance-premiums

    CVS employees will have to reveal their body weight, body fat and other medical information or pay higher insurance premiums.

    The company told employees they must have a doctor determine their weight, height, body fat, blood pressure, glucose and fasting lipid levels by May 1 or pay an extra $50 per month, or $600 a year for benefits.

  2. #2
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    So...if they do this (go to the dr) and they are determined to be overweight, diabetic, suffering from high cholesterol, requiring meds, their insurance premiums won't be raised? If that's the case, then why wouldn't you just do it? (I mean, chances are, if it's embarrassment over your weight that's keeping you from doing it, people have probably already guessed that you are overweight).

    (And I write this as an overweight person.)

    Of course, maybe there's some other reason, but judging from the criteria they are requesting, it appears to be all weight or metabolically related.

    And I don't really blame CVS for charging them extra for insurance if they don't do it, because if they are unwilling to go to the dr, then chances are, they are unwilling to make the changes necessary to lower their weight, cholesterol, blood pressure or glucose (because if they were really trying to become healthier, they wouldn't mind going to the dr), and they are going to end up costing the company a fortune in care costs somewhere down the road.

  3. #3
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    Health care is getting too controlling for me to accept. People who are overweight, underweight, disabled, genetically impaired, etc may someday be penalized or denied health care if they don't duck step. CvS will be given a reason not to hire certain people, imo. I wonder if anyone at cvs besides the managers and pharmacists even get insurance anyway.

  4. #4
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    What happens if they don't, for example, get down to a healthy weight - anything?

    The company health plan that I have requires me to fill out a form asking about weight and many other things or I have to pay more (and it's more than $600, I think). This is nothing new - we have been doing this for close to 20 years, if I recall. One slight difference is that we don't have to go to a doctor. They take our word for it on things like weight and if they ask about something that we haven't had checked, like glucose, we just tell them that we haven't had that done and that's usually it. If something, like weight, is way out of bounds, they send you information on how to improve your situation but there is no penalty if you don't improve.
    This my opinion and to the best of my knowledge, that is, if I'm not joking.


    Stan Reid

  5. #5
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    http://bostonherald.com/news_opinion...ek_health_info

    CVS Caremark Corp., which has 200,000 employees, has told all workers who use the company’s health insurance to “voluntarily” report their weight, height, body fat, glucose and lipid levels to CVS’ insurer by May 1 — or pay an additional $600 a year for coverage.

    “We want to help our employees to be as healthy as they can be, which is why we decided to implement this plan,” CVS spokesman Michael D’Angelis said yesterday.

    bbm, All? or just the ones on your plan?
    It's my opinion if no link provided.


    Misspellings due to fat fingers

    Words matter.

    You don't know what you don't know.

  6. #6
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    Hmm. Interesting.

    I understand the health issues excess weight causes. They are serious and life threatening, however, a thin person can have the same issues, especially if genetic and/or if not eating at all. (Think anorexia, bulimia health issues for instant heart failure, etc...) Or for many other reasons, smoking, drug use, including prescription drugs, allergies, it can go on and on here as far as insurance is concerned.

    Is this also in anyway b/c the stores are getting smaller, jam packed with so much carp you cannot get through the aisles even if thin? I just wonder.

    Not every over weight person can exercise and eat lettuce to lose weight. Not every over weight person can take thyroid meds to lose weight. My sister was an example. At age 9 she weighed nearly 200 pounds, nothing worked. At age 2 a doc on a naval base had her on a grapefruit and boiled egg diet. When she passed she was much, much heavier. Needless to say, a CVS store would not have hired her with this plan in place, but she would have been a great counter person b/c she loved to chat with people about any and every little thing. Not many companies did hire her. Telemarketing was the best it got.

    Unless I have included a link, it is my opinion and only my opinion that I am expressing.

  7. #7
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    Does CVS cover their employees health care after their retirement? If they do, then I don't really see what difference any bad health habits make. After all, you are going to die from something someday and the last couple of years are almost always going to cost a lot of money no matter what the cause is. In fact, dying of smoking caused lung cancer at 66 is probably going to cost a lot less than treating you for Alzheimer's Disease when you're 86 - and 10 years on until you finally punch the big time-card at 96.
    This my opinion and to the best of my knowledge, that is, if I'm not joking.


    Stan Reid

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elley Mae View Post
    http://bostonherald.com/news_opinion...ek_health_info

    CVS Caremark Corp., which has 200,000 employees, has told all workers who use the company’s health insurance to “voluntarily” report their weight, height, body fat, glucose and lipid levels to CVS’ insurer by May 1 — or pay an additional $600 a year for coverage.

    “We want to help our employees to be as healthy as they can be, which is why we decided to implement this plan,” CVS spokesman Michael D’Angelis said yesterday.

    bbm, All? or just the ones on your plan?
    Well, could you imagine the uproar if they asked ALL employees to report their weight/glucose/ect., even if they WEREN'T on their insurance?

  9. #9
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    I didn't get the impression, at all, that this was a pre-hire kind of thing (meaning, they either are, or are not going to hire you based on what you tell them.) This is for employees already hired.

    My husband had a similar scenario, but in reverse. He got "points" which would accumulate and then he would receive a debit card for a certain amount (based on how many points he got). He got points for going to the doctor for routine check ups, and points based on test results (glucose, bp, cholesterol). I'm sure weight factored in there, and I'm sure he got points off for that.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by STANDREID View Post
    What happens if they don't, for example, get down to a healthy weight - anything?
    The company health plan that I have requires me to fill out a form asking about weight and many other things or I have to pay more (and it's more than $600, I think). This is nothing new - we have been doing this for close to 20 years, if I recall. One slight difference is that we don't have to go to a doctor. They take our word for it on things like weight and if they ask about something that we haven't had checked, like glucose, we just tell them that we haven't had that done and that's usually it. If something, like weight, is way out of bounds, they send you information on how to improve your situation but there is no penalty if you don't improve.
    (bbm)
    Then they would pay more for health insurance.


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by oh_gal View Post
    (bbm)
    Then they would pay more for health insurance.
    I apologize if I missed something but I only saw that they had to pay more if they didn't go to the doctor and report the results. I didn't see it specified that your health care cost would also go up if you didn't do anything to improve your health as a result seeing the doctor and giving them the information. Perhaps that happens but I didn't see it in any of the articles.
    This my opinion and to the best of my knowledge, that is, if I'm not joking.


    Stan Reid

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by oh_gal View Post
    I didn't get the impression, at all, that this was a pre-hire kind of thing (meaning, they either are, or are not going to hire you based on what you tell them.) This is for employees already hired.

    My husband had a similar scenario, but in reverse. He got "points" which would accumulate and then he would receive a debit card for a certain amount (based on how many points he got). He got points for going to the doctor for routine check ups, and points based on test results (glucose, bp, cholesterol). I'm sure weight factored in there, and I'm sure he got points off for that.
    bbm, They have to start somewhere. Years ago I worked for a pretty big company that did alot of gov work and when it came time to implement new things they would phase them in. Like education, first no H.S. diploma, then H.S. diploma, then B.S degree, but that did not effect the existing employees, just the new hires. I am thinking that this is the beginning of things to come and it will eventually be a pre-hire kind of thing. jmo
    It's my opinion if no link provided.


    Misspellings due to fat fingers

    Words matter.

    You don't know what you don't know.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by STANDREID View Post
    I apologize if I missed something but I only saw that they had to pay more if they didn't go to the doctor and report the results. I didn't see it specified that your health care cost would also go up if you didn't do anything to improve your health as a result seeing the doctor and giving them the information. Perhaps that happens but I didn't see it in any of the articles.
    No, sorry...it was me who misunderstood what you were saying.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elley Mae View Post
    bbm, They have to start somewhere. Years ago I worked for a pretty big company that did alot of gov work and when it came time to implement new things they would phase them in. Like education, first no H.S. diploma, then H.S. diploma, then B.S degree, but that did not effect the existing employees, just the new hires. I am thinking that this is the beginning of things to come and it will eventually be a pre-hire kind of thing. jmo
    But they're not saying it's a pre-employment thing. Maybe someday it will be, but that's not what it is now. For all we know, that type of discrimination already exists with pre-employment physicals.

  15. #15
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    When I hired into a job 49 years ago, I had to take a physical and they wouldn't have hired me if my spine didn't look good on the x-ray.
    This my opinion and to the best of my knowledge, that is, if I'm not joking.


    Stan Reid

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