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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    343

    Ramsey v. Lindbergh

    haven't seen much mention of this here, so i was curious if anyone had any thoughts on the similarities between the lindbergh baby kidnapping in the 1930's to the JBR case. i came across a really interesting site about the lindbergh baby, and there was this letter written by a NY attorney to DA Alex Hunter regarding the strikingly similar circumstances surrounding both of these crimes. it's an interesting read...

    Letter to DA

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,053
    Quote Originally Posted by Voice of Reason
    haven't seen much mention of this here, so i was curious if anyone had any thoughts on the similarities between the lindbergh baby kidnapping in the 1930's to the JBR case. i came across a really interesting site about the lindbergh baby, and there was this letter written by a NY attorney to DA Alex Hunter regarding the strikingly similar circumstances surrounding both of these crimes. it's an interesting read...

    Letter to DA

    Voice,

    In case you didn't recognize the name, the author of that letter, Darnay Hoffman, represented Chris Wolf in the Wolf v Ramsey defamation lawsuit. In DOI John had called Wolf a suspect, and Wolf sued him. In the lawsuit Hoffman tried to prove that Patsy wrote the ransom note, and therefore had murdered JonBenet herself, not Wolf. The case was dismissed.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    1,315
    WOW !!! How interesting and spine tinging.

    Blue Crab....you're on it Boy. I'm impressed !

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Manhattan
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    Actually, there's a very interesting book which makes a convincing case that Lindbergh himself was responsible. This book enumerates the many many "practical jokes" that Lindbergh would play. There was a sadistic side to him, apparently. And I can't do this theory justice but it makes a very good case for this idea.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    355

    the broken ladder

    Quote Originally Posted by lisafremont
    Actually, there's a very interesting book which makes a convincing case that Lindbergh himself was responsible. This book enumerates the many many "practical jokes" that Lindbergh would play. There was a sadistic side to him, apparently. And I can't do this theory justice but it makes a very good case for this idea.

    A very interesting case; lots of circumstantial evidence pointing to Hauptman. A Broken ladder, and the skull injury, giving rise to speculation that the baby had been dropped in the extrication process and died early on.

    Just think, during all that time, while the baby lay dead in a ditch, his abductor tried to secure the ransom and assured the Lindberghs that their baby was safe and sound and well cared for. Does this remind you of "She is safe and unharmed..."?

    Quite a few parallels to Ramsey, and one big exception--the Ramsey child never left the premises....probably.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Vienna, Austria
    Posts
    29
    There's another similarity -- the "small foreign faction" -- in the Lindbergh case, probably a "faction" of one. Bruno Hauptmann was a German immigrant at a time when the US Government was having a tricky time trying to witch-hunt Germans in a country where they made up a substantial portion of the population. If they wanted a Nazi sympathizer, by the way, they should have taken a closer look at Lindbergh himself.
    I am still appalled by the racism regarding the Asian group in Boulder. Why would they harm or kill JonBenet. Wouldn't serve their cause at all.
    Your loyal flying elephant.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    3,053
    Quote Originally Posted by Dumbo

    I am still appalled by the racism regarding the Asian group in Boulder. Why would they harm or kill JonBenet. Wouldn't serve their cause at all.

    Dumbo,

    Correct, but an Asian "loose cannon" might think it would serve their cause.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    355

    one guy represented the entire faction

    Astute observations, all.

    While searching for the small foreign faction, I ran across the Garvey Essays. I was looking for a link to the usual suspects.

    In those essays there is mention of the concern that a (small?) foreign faction might interfere to a dangerous degree in U.S. foreign policy. I believe the genesis of this idea was attributed to one of our founding fathers. An example of such a faction--and I'm not anti-semitic--would be the Jewish Americans, who fervently support Israel. Some feel that our unbalanced support of Israel is, in part, what brings upon us the wrath of militant Islamists (I'm also not anti-Islam).

    The point of my remarks is not to spark a political debate, but to offer one definition of a foreign faction; in the above case, U.S. citizens who are loyal to a foreign country, or cause, by virtue of their ethnicity. I know that in my own neck of the words, when I was a sprite, there were many German immigrants--some of them my relatives--and there was a lot of talk among them about the "old country". Now, I'm waxing nostalgic.

    I ran across another definition of foreign faction that I thought might fit the bill for the one mentioned in the Ramsey note. It was a group mentioned by an Iraqi government official while Saddam was in power. Essentially, this official issued a warning to those Iraqis who might demonstrate a sympathy toward the U.S. and the coalition during the first Gulf War. I assume he was directing his threat at the Shia in the South.

    This "small foreign faction" is an ambiguous label to say the least. I thought if I could get a handle on which sort of faction the writer had in mind, I might get headed off in the right direction in search of a suspect.

    One can easily get the impression that the person or persons who composed this note had done a fair amount of research into the subject of kidnapping. I found it hard to imagine that a Ramsey parent or Burke could sufficiently educate himself/herself on the subject of kidnapping on a moment's notice; in time to crank out the note. Of course, it is reported that Patsy, especially, was an avid reader; and it is reported that Foster reached his conclusion, in part, based on poring over the material that Patsy was alleged to have read. But, Douglas made the observation that Patsy wouldn't likely have been attracted to literature and movies dealing with this topic.

    Still, if you're concerned that your daughter might be a target for abduction, won't you educate yourself about the matter? Also, John, being the CEO of a company with offices in many foreign countries, and having to engage in business-related foreign travel from time to time, might also have educated himself regarding the practices of "foreign factions" and the need to address his own security. Might you not even go so far as to procure a stun gun for your own personal use?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,053
    Quote Originally Posted by RedChief

    Might you not even go so far as to procure a stun gun for your own personal use?

    RedChief,

    Or receive one as a Christmas present from Patsy?