This recent article out of Philadelphia is just a good reminder that composites are not always accurate. http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/b...e-Drawing.html

"When you compare the photograph of the victim...to the artist rendering, the differences are striking. The sketch shows a brown-eyed brunette with a long face and pouty lips. The photograph depicts a younger, blue-eyed blonde with attractive features, fuller lips, and, an oval-shaped face.


It's true that the forensic artist and anthropologist who collaborated on the drawing had little to go on. They based their work on an examination of the skull, dental records, and minimal other evidence. "

Ultimately, dental imagery and information published to the media was successful in helping to make an identification.

Composite sketches are not an exact science and in some cases, like determining height from bone length, are based on estimations.