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  1. #1
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    If Heterophobia Was Real - A Short Film on Bullying

    I just watched the following short film, 'If Heterophobia Was Real'. It is nothing short of amazing. The film addresses the issues of bullying in an unusual context, and aims to highlight the damage that can be caused by bullying someone for being 'different'. Definitely worth the watch (only goes for about 20 minutes).

    This short moved me to tears, so just a warning, you may not want to watch it while at work.

    http://www.buzzfeed.com/aaronporchia...-was-real-93w2

    Apologies if I've put this in the wrong place, I wasn't sure which section would be best to post this in as it addresses multiple issues.
    Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the tunes without the words - and never stops at all.
    Emily Dickinson

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Public_Hysteria View Post
    I just watched the following short film, 'If Heterophobia Was Real'. It is nothing short of amazing. The film addresses the issues of bullying in an unusual context, and aims to highlight the damage that can be caused by bullying someone for being 'different'. Definitely worth the watch (only goes for about 20 minutes).

    This short moved me to tears, so just a warning, you may not want to watch it while at work.

    http://www.buzzfeed.com/aaronporchia...-was-real-93w2

    Apologies if I've put this in the wrong place, I wasn't sure which section would be best to post this in as it addresses multiple issues.
    It fails as propaganda when it merely reveals the bigotry of the film makers.

    Everybody loves you when you're six foot in the ground.
    John Lennon

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Public_Hysteria View Post
    I just watched the following short film, 'If Heterophobia Was Real'. It is nothing short of amazing. The film addresses the issues of bullying in an unusual context, and aims to highlight the damage that can be caused by bullying someone for being 'different'. Definitely worth the watch (only goes for about 20 minutes).

    This short moved me to tears, so just a warning, you may not want to watch it while at work.

    http://www.buzzfeed.com/aaronporchia...-was-real-93w2

    Apologies if I've put this in the wrong place, I wasn't sure which section would be best to post this in as it addresses multiple issues.
    OK-I watched the movie and have to say that I didn't like it. I had a difficult time understanding and really "getting the point" of what life would be like in an all homosexual world. Perhaps it is because it simply doesn't make any sense to see OUR world in such a different way.

    I also didn't care for the obvious attacks on the Catholic church. Catholics, while believing that homosexuality is a sin, do not preach "hate." They preach understanding and tolerance. At least the Catholic church that I belong to does. I do not agree with everything the Catholic church stands for, but I feel that it is the best church for me for many other reasons. And they don't say that homosexuality should be illegal. So they aren't really forcing their beliefs on homosexuality on anyone other than Catholics. And as a Catholic, if you don't agree, you can choose to leave the church at any time. So I don't believe it is fair that they use that analogy.

    I also thought there was a big flaw in the movie, because it tried to make some kind of statement about gender identity as well, but seemed to get muddled up in the process. The girl dressed like a girl and acted like a girl, yet somehow was a football player and disappointed her parents by not making the team? Yet in the gym, it was obvious that the boy's other brother was a "jock" playing basketball. So that kind of confused me, as I wasn't sure what they were trying to do there.

    So while I understand the message, I think it would have had a more powerful message if it hadn't "beaten the message" into the viewer as much as it obviously did. Also, it showed no one in the film that had any compassion for the girl, including her parents. While I understand that it was difficult for the girl, and these incidents apparently did happen to real people, it just seemed to be "over the top" in such a way and to make it seem unbelievable. I also found it difficult to understand how all of these people came to be if "breeders" were such outcasts. I don't know...I guess if the film were longer, some of this could have been better hashed out.

    I feel a better example of this kind of thing is an old episode of Star Trek-The Next Generation called The Outcast. It is a story about a genderless civilization in which a character feels inclined to choose a gender and is considered an outcast and a criminal and needs to be "cured." This particular story, in my opinion, really was touching and helped me to better understand how a gay person must feel being different, and how compassion and understanding is not a lot to ask. And that there is nothing wrong with being different.

    Here is a link to an edited version of the episode I found on youtube. It's got some strange edits in it (I'm not sure where they came from-they are kind of funny, but oddly placed.) I do find it interesting that a story about a civilization from another planet hit home for me more than the one about our own civilization turned completely upside down.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDljwStDG7k
    Everything I post without a supporting link is always JMO.

  4. #4
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    It fails as propaganda because the title alone is a turn-off. What is wrong with the people who put this film together? Do they really believe that straight kids don't get bullied? I was bullied and sexually harassed to the point that I simply quit going to school because the environment was intolerable. Just the title of this video is, IMO, offensive. I can't imagine how bad the actual film is, and I certainly won't waste the time to watch it.
    all my comments are just my opinion. jmho. moo. etc. etc.

  5. #5
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    I haven't seen the film either but just from this thread, I didn't get the impression that the film was supposed to claim that straight kids don't get bulled. of course they do. Most of the time probably not because they're straight though.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donjeta View Post
    I haven't seen the film either but just from this thread, I didn't get the impression that the film was supposed to claim that straight kids don't get bulled. of course they do. Most of the time probably not because they're straight though.-
    Guess there's a movie coming out at some point.

    http://www.pqmonthly.com/kellan-lutz...ted-world/5529

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by gxm View Post
    It fails as propaganda because the title alone is a turn-off. What is wrong with the people who put this film together? Do they really believe that straight kids don't get bullied? I was bullied and sexually harassed to the point that I simply quit going to school because the environment was intolerable. Just the title of this video is, IMO, offensive. I can't imagine how bad the actual film is, and I certainly won't waste the time to watch it.
    I watched it. It shows bullying, but links it specifically to sexuality when everyone knows the same could be said/linked to any other immutable quality. I don't know how one could handle it in an "agenda blind" manner. Maybe vignettes that would include the sufferings of hetero/white/"popular" girls and boys along with the usual victims. Everyone who's been a kid knows that bullying is universal. jmo

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDuchess View Post
    OK-I watched the movie and have to say that I didn't like it. I had a difficult time understanding and really "getting the point" of what life would be like in an all homosexual world. Perhaps it is because it simply doesn't make any sense to see OUR world in such a different way.

    I also didn't care for the obvious attacks on the Catholic church. Catholics, while believing that homosexuality is a sin, do not preach "hate." They preach understanding and tolerance. At least the Catholic church that I belong to does. I do not agree with everything the Catholic church stands for, but I feel that it is the best church for me for many other reasons. And they don't say that homosexuality should be illegal. So they aren't really forcing their beliefs on homosexuality on anyone other than Catholics. And as a Catholic, if you don't agree, you can choose to leave the church at any time. So I don't believe it is fair that they use that analogy.

    I also thought there was a big flaw in the movie, because it tried to make some kind of statement about gender identity as well, but seemed to get muddled up in the process. The girl dressed like a girl and acted like a girl, yet somehow was a football player and disappointed her parents by not making the team? Yet in the gym, it was obvious that the boy's other brother was a "jock" playing basketball. So that kind of confused me, as I wasn't sure what they were trying to do there.

    So while I understand the message, I think it would have had a more powerful message if it hadn't "beaten the message" into the viewer as much as it obviously did. Also, it showed no one in the film that had any compassion for the girl, including her parents. While I understand that it was difficult for the girl, and these incidents apparently did happen to real people, it just seemed to be "over the top" in such a way and to make it seem unbelievable. I also found it difficult to understand how all of these people came to be if "breeders" were such outcasts. I don't know...I guess if the film were longer, some of this could have been better hashed out.

    I feel a better example of this kind of thing is an old episode of Star Trek-The Next Generation called The Outcast. It is a story about a genderless civilization in which a character feels inclined to choose a gender and is considered an outcast and a criminal and needs to be "cured." This particular story, in my opinion, really was touching and helped me to better understand how a gay person must feel being different, and how compassion and understanding is not a lot to ask. And that there is nothing wrong with being different.

    Here is a link to an edited version of the episode I found on youtube. It's got some strange edits in it (I'm not sure where they came from-they are kind of funny, but oddly placed.) I do find it interesting that a story about a civilization from another planet hit home for me more than the one about our own civilization turned completely upside down.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDljwStDG7k
    I definitely agree that the clip is very over the top in parts, but I think that it had to be to get the message across in such a short time frame. I agree that the attacks on the Catholic church were very biased; I don't believe any one religion should have been singled out, especially to the extent that it was, but sadly a lot of people are ostracized from the religions they have grown up with because of their sexual preferences. I've even witnessed cases where people were harshly judged for certain lifestyle choices they made (like living together in a heterosexual relationship without being married, or having a child out of wedlock).

    In saying this, I do believe that there were some important issues touched on throughout this, which is why I posted it. Her parents didn't really accept her liking boys and she was ostracized from her classmates. The boy she kissed shunned her publicly and basically denied that there was ever anything between them. These things are all experiences of gay and lesbian teens (and sometimes even adults), so while they were exaggerated in the clip, they still ring true for many. I also believe that it perfectly captured the feelings of loneliness and hurt that the main character felt - even taken out of the context of 'heterophobia', it is something that bullying victims feel often.

    I was bullied when I was in school, and I suffered with very low self-esteem for most of my teenage years because of this. So while the bullying was not on a level that I could ever begin to understand, I do understand the impact it can have on a young person trying to find who they are and where they fit in with the world, which is why it really struck a chord with me.

    I haven't seen the Star Trek episode that you've linked to, but I'll be sure to watch it when I get home. Thanks.
    Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the tunes without the words - and never stops at all.
    Emily Dickinson

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by gxm View Post
    It fails as propaganda because the title alone is a turn-off. What is wrong with the people who put this film together? Do they really believe that straight kids don't get bullied? I was bullied and sexually harassed to the point that I simply quit going to school because the environment was intolerable. Just the title of this video is, IMO, offensive. I can't imagine how bad the actual film is, and I certainly won't waste the time to watch it.
    At no point did I feel the film was belittling or ignoring the bullying that goes on for any other child, it just chose one case to focus on in particular. It would have been impossible for the film to touch on every single thing a child can be bullied for. The bullying was also only part of the message, the other was the discrimination that a lot of people who are attracted to others of the same sex face on a daily basis.
    Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the tunes without the words - and never stops at all.
    Emily Dickinson

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Public_Hysteria View Post
    At no point did I feel the film was belittling or ignoring the bullying that goes on for any other child, it just chose one case to focus on in particular. It would have been impossible for the film to touch on every single thing a child can be bullied for. The bullying was also only part of the message, the other was the discrimination that a lot of people who are attracted to others of the same sex face on a daily basis.
    Thanks. It never fails that when discrimination of one kind or toward one group is discussed, there are those who criticize the mention of it by saying that other groups are discriminated against as well, as if the failure to equally mention all types of discrimination reduces the effectiveness of the message. It doesn't. It's just a discussion of how one group is affected.

    Thanks for posting this short film. I'm going to watch it later.
    For Elizabeth, a minor child, a victim. Thank God she is home!

    *Gitana (means "Gypsy girl"). Pronounced "hee tah nah."


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Public_Hysteria View Post
    At no point did I feel the film was belittling or ignoring the bullying that goes on for any other child, it just chose one case to focus on in particular. It would have been impossible for the film to touch on every single thing a child can be bullied for. The bullying was also only part of the message, the other was the discrimination that a lot of people who are attracted to others of the same sex face on a daily basis.
    Then why is this in the Bullying section if it's really about LGBT discrimination? IMO, just the title alone is othering and marginalizing towards straight kids who are bullied. It really seems to answer its own question with the reply that heterophobia is, apparently, very real. IMO, marginalizing and othering is divisive. And I'm not interested in watching a video that rationalizes its own form of discrimination as a way to make a point. All victims of bullying deserve compassion, not some more than others.

    I have to shake my head at the irony that when I finally went back to high school to complete three years of work in one year (I was in classes from sunup to sundown, Saturdays too) that I, a straight girl, was harassed for being a lesbian. But, hey, that doesn't matter cuz I wasn't really gay. Right?
    all my comments are just my opinion. jmho. moo. etc. etc.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donjeta View Post
    I haven't seen the film either but just from this thread, I didn't get the impression that the film was supposed to claim that straight kids don't get bulled. of course they do. Most of the time probably not because they're straight though.
    BBM.

    I can only imagine that you don't follow bullying cases much. Here's a recent story in the news: http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/31/world/...cebook-suicide
    all my comments are just my opinion. jmho. moo. etc. etc.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by gxm View Post
    BBM.

    I can only imagine that you don't follow bullying cases much. Here's a recent story in the news: http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/31/world/...cebook-suicide
    I see absolutely nothing about the story you linked to suggest that she was bullied for being heterosexual rather than homosexual, so I think the snark in your post is unseemly.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by gxm View Post
    Then why is this in the Bullying section if it's really about LGBT discrimination? IMO, just the title alone is othering and marginalizing towards straight kids who are bullied. It really seems to answer its own question with the reply that heterophobia is, apparently, very real. IMO, marginalizing and othering is divisive. And I'm not interested in watching a video that rationalizes its own form of discrimination as a way to make a point. All victims of bullying deserve compassion, not some more than others.

    I have to shake my head at the irony that when I finally went back to high school to complete three years of work in one year (I was in classes from sunup to sundown, Saturdays too) that I, a straight girl, was harassed for being a lesbian. But, hey, that doesn't matter cuz I wasn't really gay. Right?
    That is why I stated the following in my original post.
    Apologies if I've put this in the wrong place, I wasn't sure which section would be best to post this in as it addresses multiple issues.
    It seems I'll have to go through this thread to double check that every thread here covers bullying only in a general sense, as I wasn't aware that every thread here had to cover all the possible things someone can be bullied for - considering it is a section for multiple threads to be made regarding the broader issue of bullying, I would think that each thread would likely touch on a separate issue.

    I also believe that acting on discrimination against another is a form of bullying (which can take many different forms), so it seems fitting that the thread is placed in the section for bullying on this forum, even though the video is a hypothetical situation. If you watched the video you would see that the video is based in the context of a world where being straight is the equivalent of being gay or lesbian - gay and lesbian relationships are the 'norm', while those attracted to the opposite sex are marginalized for their sexual preferences. It is simply trying to put the viewer in another's shoes, to see the impact that discrimination (and in turn, bullying caused by this discrimination) can have on an individual.

    At no point has anyone tried to belittle the effects any other form of bullying has on the victim; if you have taken it this way I apologize. Being a victim of bullying and sexual assault myself, I didn't take any offense to the video; and even though it was in relation to a form of bullying I have never personally experienced I could still relate to the feelings the main character was going through. I am truly very sorry about what you went through - no form of bullying is EVER acceptable, under ANY circumstance.
    Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the tunes without the words - and never stops at all.
    Emily Dickinson

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Montjoy View Post
    I see absolutely nothing about the story you linked to suggest that she was bullied for being heterosexual rather than homosexual, so I think the snark in your post is unseemly.
    Read it again. Her ex-boyfriend led the bullying brigade. As the victim was a girl, we can only assume that they had a heterosexual relationship. Many victims of bullying are young women who have their sexuality attacked. Anyone who follows bullying cases would know how prevalent this problem is. But after reading this thread I'm beginning to realize that heterophobia is quite real and there are people who think attacking a young person's sexuality is only a problem if that young person is LGBT.

    Jessica Laney, 16, was found dead at her home in Hudson, Florida, on Sunday night after users on social networking sites branded her 'fat', a 'slut' and tormented her over her looks and love life.

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz2aoU2q2ko

    Gabrielle Molina was a seventh grader at a local middle school where her classmates would call her a slut and a whore, her family said last week.

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz2aoUR2Hmj
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

    An emotional Stacy Conner told WCIA-TV: 'They'd call her a slut. Ashlynn's ugly. She's fat.'

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz2aoXtHTWY
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
    all my comments are just my opinion. jmho. moo. etc. etc.

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