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  1. #1
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    Ukraine President's fled, who's caring for the animals left behind?

    Months of protests in Ukraine have led to President Yanukovich 'leaving the building', as they say.

    Now the gates of his luxury palace have been opened to the public and amongst the predictable excesses, a private zoo and farm have been revealed, absolutely full of caged domestic and exotic animals.

    I'me very worried for their welfare. They must cost a fortune to feed, and is there anyone left there to do it? Staff won't be paid now and would they have stayed anyway, now the President's fled? It's depressing that the absent president collected all those animals and then just abandoned them to their fate.

    If anybody has heard what's happening to them, please post!

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/0...n_4838187.html

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...e-9146886.html

    Maybe this refuge is still in the Crimea and could help?
    http://www.artukraine.com/old/travel/yalta_zoo.htm

    http://blogs.channel4.com/matt-frei-...o-protest/3541
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  2. #2
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    As Crimea is now full of Russian military, it's safe to say the animals will not be taken there for refuge. People in Ukraine are very concerned with their futures now and the animals will take second place. I'm just hoping there is no further bloodshed.

    Apparently, Kiev zoo has had issues in the past and says that conditions at the former president's palace are actually better than the zoo. The palace has not been destroyed and protesters have been trying to keep the animals fed and watered.

    In return, the farm goats have been used to supply protesters with milk. It's obvious some permanent form of care urgently needs to be put in place though. I haven't seen any photos of animals that need highly secure care and lots of meat, such as lions or tigers, so perhaps they won't have to be shot - though I believe this could still be a danger.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-26360717

    https://www.thedodo.com/what-will-ha...-445024691.htm

    https://www.thedodo.com/ousted-ukrai...442459107.html
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  3. #3
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    Ukraine on 'brink of disaster'.

    http://edition.cnn.com/2014/03/02/wo...aine-politics/

    I've just realized Ukraine's closest point is around 500 miles away from where I am now. I'm trying to stop myself running around yelling 'The Russians are coming!" at all my German friends. They only left here just over 20 years ago and nobody's ready for a return visit - all their barracks have been turned into supermarkets.

    I am very sad and fearful for Ukraine and all the people and creatures inside the country now. It truly is a country with one foot in the West and one foot in the East. In the best of worlds, they could be getting help from both 'sides'. Instead it looks like the world's about to do its worst. I don't know what will happen to the Presidential palace and the zoo if the former president tries to reclaim it, because I think protesters will fight.

    I hope it doesn't come to that, but hope some kind souls will evacuate the animals if it looks like it will.
    We 'embraced' the missing Bob Harrod case as requested but 6 years on, are still waiting for further guidance


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  4. #4
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    Oh Lord. I went on Ukraine's tourist FB page. I'm not a member of FB and can't read Russian so, so much for my sleuthing there. But it links to an English language forum for Ukraine, and I looked for zoo info there.

    And instead found that all men have been called to attend recruitment offices in the morning.

    https://www.facebook.com/ukrainecom
    We 'embraced' the missing Bob Harrod case as requested but 6 years on, are still waiting for further guidance


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  5. #5
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    Absolutely amazed that things have started to 'blow up' in the Ukraine. I guess I assumed things had become more peaceful over there.
    And it's not like anyone predicted this could happen -- that Russia would invade.
    Hopefully things calm down ; simply cannot believe ANYONE over there really wants war.

  6. #6
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    I have friends involved with an international adoption in Ukraine, who (IMO) are pretty much in denial about how dangerous and difficult things have become there.

    They have met and hosted the young boy (age 5) in their home in the U.S., and have also traveled to Ukraine just before Christmas-- and had to return very suddenly when things in Kiev became troublesome. While I'm hopeful for them, I'm also realistic (I'm also an adoptive parent internationally), and believe that it's likely that Ukraine may not be able to have enough of a functional government to complete this adoption.

    It's painful to see them so (IMO, unrealistically hopeful), and acknowledge that things just are not moving in the right direction for them, and the young boy. They are very religious, so their faith keeps them hopeful and optimistic. I just really hope they don't take any trips there in the next few weeks. They have 2 other kids to think about.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by K_Z View Post
    I have friends involved with an international adoption in Ukraine, who (IMO) are pretty much in denial about how dangerous and difficult things have become there.

    They have met and hosted the young boy (age 5) in their home in the U.S., and have also traveled to Ukraine just before Christmas-- and had to return very suddenly when things in Kiev became troublesome. While I'm hopeful for them, I'm also realistic (I'm also an adoptive parent internationally), and believe that it's likely that Ukraine may not be able to have enough of a functional government to complete this adoption.

    It's painful to see them so (IMO, unrealistically hopeful), and acknowledge that things just are not moving in the right direction for them, and the young boy. They are very religious, so their faith keeps them hopeful and optimistic. I just really hope they don't take any trips there in the next few weeks. They have 2 other kids to think about.
    That sucks. Situation in Ukraine seems very unstable so adoption are very unlikely to be a priorty.
    Just my opinion

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by zwiebel View Post
    Oh Lord. I went on Ukraine's tourist FB page. I'm not a member of FB and can't read Russian so, so much for my sleuthing there. But it links to an English language forum for Ukraine, and I looked for zoo info there.

    And instead found that all men have been called to attend recruitment offices in the morning.

    https://www.facebook.com/ukrainecom
    Google translate does a pretty good job if you need to translate something from Russian into English.
    Just my opinion

  9. #9
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    Oh my, Zwiebel. I'm so afraid the animals will be forgotten. Thank goodness for the people that are caring for them now, but how much longer will they be able to continue with the poor animals' care and upkeep? That is an enormous task even for the trained and capable even under normal circumstances.
    Rescuing one animal may not change the world, but for that one animal their world is changed forever! -Unknown

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by LietKynes View Post
    Absolutely amazed that things have started to 'blow up' in the Ukraine. I guess I assumed things had become more peaceful over there.
    And it's not like anyone predicted this could happen -- that Russia would invade.
    Hopefully things calm down ; simply cannot believe ANYONE over there really wants war.
    You are talking about the Russians....IMO they are still living in the mentality of the last century and have not matured as a nation, like the rest of Europe has.

    IMO there are many parallels between Germany in the late 30s and Russia today. The world needs to watch out, because if there is appeasement on the Ukraine issue, who knows where it will lead to. We saw what happened last time Europe attempted that approach. The continent needs to protect Ukraine.


  11. #11
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    From the viewpoint of one who has not studied the history of the Ukraine ; it seemed like the Ukraine was part of Russia like Texas is part of the U.S.
    But after Googling the Ukraine's relationship to Russia --- it is more complicated than that.

    According to various articles on msm, Ukraine gained some independence in the 1950's and was granted some sort of protection in the 1990's.(?)

    Sorry to be so vague about this country. If anyone is interested, I can find some links.
    Right now I'm afraid for all of the innocent people caught up in this escalating situation.

    Not to mention the zoo and farm animals. We have pets and would never think of letting them go a day without proper care and attention from us, their 'family'.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by K_Z View Post
    I have friends involved with an international adoption in Ukraine, who (IMO) are pretty much in denial about how dangerous and difficult things have become there.

    They have met and hosted the young boy (age 5) in their home in the U.S., and have also traveled to Ukraine just before Christmas-- and had to return very suddenly when things in Kiev became troublesome. While I'm hopeful for them, I'm also realistic (I'm also an adoptive parent internationally), and believe that it's likely that Ukraine may not be able to have enough of a functional government to complete this adoption.

    It's painful to see them so (IMO, unrealistically hopeful), and acknowledge that things just are not moving in the right direction for them, and the young boy. They are very religious, so their faith keeps them hopeful and optimistic. I just really hope they don't take any trips there in the next few weeks. They have 2 other kids to think about.

    They need to take a reality check… Russia seems hellbent on taking control of that country and if it does happen, it would be of no surprise if Putin stops all adoptions to US citizens. He already has that ban in place in Russia.

    I know of someone that hosts older orphaned Ukranian kids during the summer. They got word that the orphanages have seen their funding dwindle due to the conflict, thus food and meds are at a minimum and basic toiletries have ran out.
    Last edited by Elphaba; 03-03-2014 at 10:29 PM.

  13. #13
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    I really do not know about hopes for adoption - the current president is only temporary, and in a precarious position. What does that mean for the rest of the government?

    In terms of history, Ukraine hasn't been a country for very long at all - Russia is at least a cousin, if not a brother. The whole situation seems crazy to me. But if you look at where the occupation is in Crimea, it's kind of obvious why Putin feels the need to stamp his footprint there, from a strategic position.
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  14. #14
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    Okay, now my tiny country's given big Russia a 'warning'. Not about financial stuff though, which is the only lever we have. Putin will not be quaking in his boots, I think.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-26415789
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  15. #15
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    In comments about "the Russians" I would like for there to be a recognition of the difference between the people of Russia and the political leaders of Russia. The Russian people as a whole have suffered greatly under their leaders. They suffered under the czars and they've suffered under the communists.

    Putin is doing exectly what Hitler did in Poland in 1939. He has invaded another soverign country. There are Russians living here in the U.S. Would that make it okay for Russian military forces to enter our country on the pretext that Putin is worried about the Russians who are in the U.S.?

    The people of Russian heritage who live in the Crimea are legally citizens of the Ukraine. This is not anything recent.

    Putin wants the area due to the access to the Black Sea. He's making a grab in the same manner despots have done for centuries. It is a question of what will the rest of the world do to stop him?

    Putin chose a good time for this move psychologically, right when the U.S. is sick and tired of Iraq and Afghanistan and just days after the announcement of a plan to scale back the size of the U.S. military. The sentiment to not get involved would seem to be high among our politicians.

    But how does the saying go? "Those who ignore history are condemned to repeat it"? We all know how well appeasement worked with Hitler.

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