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  1. #1

    WI - Kenneth Juedes, 58, Unity, 30 Aug 2006

    Ken Juedes was found dead at his home in Unity, Wisconsin, on August 30, 2006. At the time of his death, he was scheduled to testify in three separate legal actions against his business partner, Randy Landwehr, regarding embezzlement and securities fraud relating to Monster Hall Raceway. Randy publicly threatened to kill Ken if Ken continued with these civil actions. Cindy Ewer Schulz, who lived with Ken at the time of the murder, was discovered to be in collusion with Randy and Randy's sister, Janet Kneiss. In the two years prior to the murder, Cindy had arranged for five separate life/accidental policies naming her as primary beneficiary, totaling almost $1,000,000.00. Three of those insurance applications containing probable forged signatures.
    Ken's body was found unclothed on his bed, lying face up, even though the fatal wound was in his lower back. Cindy reported Ken's death the morning after he was killed and admitted to being at Ken's home during the murder, claiming she did not hear any shotgun blasts. When EMT's arrived in response to the 9-1-1 call that morning, the floors were still wet from an apparent cleaning. Ken had security cameras at his house, but Cindy admitted to turning them off several days before the murder. She claimed that the digital cameras made too much noise. Ken also was caring for foster children at his house, but Cindy had them removed a week before the murder without explanation. Cindy had no verified alibi for the night of the murder and told conflicting stories about her actions after the body was found.
    In spite of these suspicious circumstances, upon arrival at the scene, Marathon County investigators, led by Detective Greg Bean, did not ask Cindy to come in for questioning and did not test her hands for residue. Investigators never interviewed Ken's father, who died a year later. They submitted a false interview with Ken's sister into the case file. They did not interview Ken's closest friend or housekeeper for a year after Ken's murder. They failed to respond to call into the tip line from an ex-employee who had witnessed Cindy and Randy's collusion.
    On the day Ken's murder was reported, they allowed Cindy to remain resting at a neighbor's house (where she took a short nap) and then allowed Cindy's friends and family free access to the crime scene later that night, even though the murder weapon and shotgun casings had not been recovered. After a cursory autopsy of Ken's body by a private physician, Marathon County released the body to Cindy for immediate cremation. The entire 120acre farm was released to Cindy on the day after the body was found. Neighbors witnessed smoke from her destruction of property on the farm for days afterward.
    Ken's will, which left his estate to his children, was never found. Instead, a month after the murder, Cindy submitted a copy of a will which had never been seen before to Ken's probate case. The will lsupposedly eft Ken's estate to her.Ken had never mentioned the existence of the will to his friends or family and his signature on the document was determined to be a probable forgery. The signature of one of the witnesses on this will was proven to be a forgery by the witness's testimony and work records.
    After six months passed without Marathon County making an arrest in the case, the insurance companies still refused to pay benefits to Cindy. Greg Bean then arranged for Cindy to take a Layered Voice Analysis in a nearby county. The detective administering the LVA determined that Cindy did not kill Ken, but also determined that Cindy avoided answering questions regarding co-conspirators. The LVA also determined that Cindy's answers to all other questions were lies. The results of the LVA were given to Greg Bean but not released through a FOIA. However, a two page internal law enforcement document stating that the LVA determined Cindy had not killed Ken was given to Cindy, who submitted it to the insurance companies through her lawyer. The insurance companies verified this fact with detectives and began paying out benefits within a month.
    Cindy's actions during the two years prior to the murder seem to indicate that she had planned to create enough circumstantial evidence against one of Ken's children from a prior marriage to facilitate an arrest of this innocent minor child. Due to a fortunate series of events, this son was not in the area on the night of the murder and was never arrested. As the case began to grow cold, Cindy brought a letter to Detective Bean that she claimed to have received from St. Paul, Minnesota. Ken's eldest son lived near St. Paul. Detective Bean issued a press release that stated the letter contained information that only the killer would have known. Documents released through a FOIA request revealed that it also contained a pubic hair. Ken's children would occasionally stay overnight at Ken's house and Cindy was known to have been collecting hair and other DNA-laden samples before the murder; at one point even pulling several hairs out of the head of Ken's friend when he bent over to put on his shoes! Detective Bean immediately admitted the letter into evidence and sent the pubic hair for DNA testing but the testing could not conclusively pinpoint the owner. The case continued without arrest.

    I am looking for any information about several people involved in this case: Cindy Ewer Schulz, Randy Landwehr, Janet Kneiss and Detective Greg Bean of Marathon County. I want to be clear that the Greg Bean involved in this case is in no way related to Detective Greg Bean of the Bellevue, Washington, PD. To my knowledge, the Greg Bean involved in Ken's investigation has only been involved in Wisconsin law enforcement investigations. I believe that his father is Howard Bean, who also was a law enforcement officer in Central Wisconsin and is now retired.

  2. #2
    A Madison-Capital Times 27 Oct 2007 news article shows her name as Cindy Schulz Juedes. The article states she slept outside the home that night in a refuge just outside their home on the 30-acre property because she had a serious sinus infection. Her husband gave her painkillers to "totally knock me out," she told WAOW-TV in Wausau. "It did."

    I would be curious to know where her husband got the painkillers from if they weren't prescribed to him or her. It's illegal to take non-prescribed narcotics. That's a crime in itself.
    Last edited by ablewasiereisawelba; 02-27-2014 at 05:14 PM.

  3. #3
    The July 14, 2013 issue of Central Wisconsin Sunday, whose articles highlight cold cases, states, "We had many suspects in the beginning, said Marathon County Sheriff's Lt. Greg Bean,...In fact, we were pretty sure about who could have done this thing. But the more we looked, the more we were convinced that all roads led to Cindy (Schulz-Juedes)."

    In fact, this huge, three page cold case article lays out a damning case against Schulz-Juedes. Currently, they are waiting for the final report from Wisconsin DCI before they decide to prosecute. It appears her sister from Washington State has been down to Wisconsin to review the case and has been highly critical of Lt. Bean and other investigators (page 9A). I encourage you to read that article because it appears the hammer is gonna be coming down hard on the prime suspect.

    http://www.badgerlink.net/

    Note: Badgerlink censuses, newspapers, genealogical records, etc. can be accessed by anyone free using your local Wisconsin library card.

    BadgerLink is Wisconsin’s free online library which provides access to licensed content such as magazines, newspapers, scholarly articles, videos, images, and music. These resources are provided exclusively for use by all Wisconsin residents and are materials that are not available through regular search engines such as Google.
    Last edited by ablewasiereisawelba; 02-27-2014 at 06:43 PM. Reason: addition

  4. #4
    Digital Discovery replies:
    Cindy's maiden name was Cindy Sue Ewer. She had been married previously to Tom Schulz. They were divorced in 2002. Her name would have been Cindy Ewer Schulz when she met Ken in 2002.

    There are issues regarding the legality of her marriage to Ken and, hence, her use of the last name Schulz-Juedes. In early 2004, Cindy told Ken's mother, alone, that she had married Ken during a previous vacation with Ken in Las Vegas. Clark County Nevada records proved this to be a lie. After Ken's family told Cindy that they knew her stories about their marriage was a fabrication, Cindy and Ken took a second vacation to Las Vegas in October, 2004.

    After their return from this second trip, Cindy again claimed that they had been married. This time there was a marriage certificate on file in Clark County. Ken's family was able to get a copy of the marriage application and found that Ken's signature on this document was abnormal. When questioned about the marriage, Ken told friends that on the date listed on the marriage certificate, Cindy had given him something to drink in their hotel room and he had no memory of the rest of the day. Cindy displayed photos of her "wedding" after Ken's death, but the person she is standing next to at the ceremony does not appear to be Ken. The wedding certificate from the Las Vegas hotel that certified the wedding is unsigned. Although the marriage certificate on file in Clark County is valid, these issues make her marriage questionable. After 2004, Cindy would occasionally use the name of Cindy Schulz-Juedes but also continued to use the name Cindy Schulz.

    Cindy claimed to have spent the night of Ken's murder in a 1969 17' Mallard Duckling parked adjacent to the rear of the house because she told investigators that she had a headache and felt it was the only place she could rest comfortably. She told others that she was not on Ken's farm when he was killed. Ken's house was a three story custom home with two empty bedrooms in addition to the master suite. The Mallard Duckling was in poor condition with minimal ventilation and infested with insects. Witnesses testified that she had always vehemently refused to sleep in the trailer even when it had been in better condition years before.

    Cindy's medical problems and the medications she claims to have taken on the night of the murder changed throughout the course of the investigation. Whatever the cause, her claims of a headache began several weeks before the murder and cleared up on the day Ken's body was found. The LVA indicated deceit about her claims of what medication she took that night. There has never been any indication that Ken, a pharmacist, ever was involved in illegal activities related to prescription medication.

    The farm that Ken purchased in the 70's originally only had 30 acres. Ken had saved and invested in purchases of property that adjoined his farm until it was well over 100 acres. The article that mentioned his farm as only being on 30 acres was incorrect.

  5. #5

    Reference to Gannett News article

    I think you are referring to an article that was published in a number of newspapers around the state and was titled, "Pharmacist's slaying a 'nightmare' case" by reporter Shereen Skola.

    http://www.wausaudailyherald.com/art...nightmare-case
    “We had many suspects in the beginning,” Marathon County Sheriff’s Lt. Greg Bean, who has been a primary investigator on the case from the start, said. “In fact, we were pretty sure about who could have done this thing. But the more we looked, the more we were convinced that all roads led to Cindy.”

    Unfortunately, Det. Greg Bean did not mention when "we" came to this conclusion but he did not state it publicly until 2013, long after the insurance benefits had been distributed to Cindy because of his failed investigation. Also, unfortunately, it does not take into consideration the results of the LVA, the conclusion of a team of financial forensic investigators and testimony by several witnesses who all suggest that there might also have been paths that Det. Greg Bean may not have followed.
    Last edited by Digital Discovery; 02-27-2014 at 08:39 PM. Reason: add URL

  6. #6
    A Taylor County search warrant was done for Brandon A. Ewer in 2009, 1 month after a firearms violation. Is he connected to the case?
    Last edited by ablewasiereisawelba; 02-27-2014 at 07:37 PM. Reason: date change

  7. #7
    Cindy's medical problems and the medications she claims to have taken on the night of the murder changed throughout the course of the investigation. Whatever the cause, her claims of a headache began several weeks before the murder and cleared up on the day Ken's body was found. The LVA indicated deceit about her claims of what medication she took that night. There has never been any indication that Ken, a pharmacist, ever was involved in illegal activities related to prescription medication.

    They should have done a blood test on her, IMO. I would assume a pharmacist wouldn't jeopardize his license and that he would not have given her any narcotic. I assume they tested his blood to make sure he hadn't been drugged?

  8. #8

    Ewer connection?

    Quote Originally Posted by ablewasiereisawelba View Post
    A Taylor County search warrant was done for Brandon A. Ewer in 2009, 1 month after a firearms violation. Is he connected to the case?
    No, I don't believe that he has any connection to the case.

  9. #9

    Blood tests

    Quote Originally Posted by ablewasiereisawelba View Post
    They should have done a blood test on her, IMO. I would assume a pharmacist wouldn't jeopardize his license and that he would not have given her any narcotic. I assume they tested his blood to make sure he hadn't been drugged?
    IMHO as well.
    Her actions that morning are very odd. According to her deposition, she entered the rear of the house after leaving the trailer, walked past the closed door to the bedroom where the body lay and entered the master bath through a separate hallway. The master bath was connected to the master bedroom by a closed door, which she didn't open. Wondering if Ken had left for work, she left the master bath via the hallway door and checked the front driveway for his car. Not seeing the car, she then re-entered the master bath, opened the connecting door to the master bedroom and discovered the body. At that point she left the master bathroom again via the hallway to use the landline phone in the kitchen. She has given several reasons why she was unable to make that 9-1-1 call herself. At some point she remembered standing in the master bedroom next to the bed on which the body lay with the bedroom phone handset in her hand, but she had no memory of how she entered the bedroom or left it.
    She makes no mention of why she failed to call 9-1-1 via her cell phone or Ken's cell phone after discovering the body, but left the house to run to the neighboring farm. Upon reaching the neighboring farm, she asked the neighbor to call 9-1-1 for her and then left that house while the call was being made. The neighbor said she saw Cindy drive away from their farm and up the road toward a second farm. Cindy claimed that she did not have her car at the first farm and ran back to the house to get her car so that she could drive to the second farm.
    Upon reaching the second farm, she asked that owner to call 9-1-1 for her and then spent the remainder of the day in their living room. The neighbor watched her all day until Cindy left to stay with her sister late that evening. The neighbor did not recall Cindy's blood being taken or any request by law enforcement to do so.
    Ken's blood was taken during the autopsy, but law enforcement did not release the types of testing done on it.
    Ken's friends and family all feel certain that he would not have risked his license to acquire prescription pain medicine for Cindy but would have encouraged her to seek a medical diagnosis.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Digital Discovery View Post
    I think you are referring to an article that was published in a number of newspapers around the state and was titled, "Pharmacist's slaying a 'nightmare' case" by reporter Shereen Skola.

    http://www.wausaudailyherald.com/art...nightmare-case
    “We had many suspects in the beginning,” Marathon County Sheriff’s Lt. Greg Bean, who has been a primary investigator on the case from the start, said. “In fact, we were pretty sure about who could have done this thing. But the more we looked, the more we were convinced that all roads led to Cindy.”

    Unfortunately, Det. Greg Bean did not mention when "we" came to this conclusion but he did not state it publicly until 2013, long after the insurance benefits had been distributed to Cindy because of his failed investigation. Also, unfortunately, it does not take into consideration the results of the LVA, the conclusion of a team of financial forensic investigators and testimony by several witnesses who all suggest that there might also have been paths that Det. Greg Bean may not have followed.
    quote...Unfortunately, Det. Greg Bean did not mention when "we" came to this conclusion but he did not state it publicly until 2013, long after the insurance benefits had been distributed to Cindy because of his failed investigation. Also, unfortunately, it does not take into consideration the results of the LVA, the conclusion of a team of financial forensic investigators and testimony by several witnesses who all suggest that there might also have been paths that Det. Greg Bean may not have followed. ...end of quote.

    What is LVA?

    When you say other paths? Do you mean other paths that lead away from the woman or other paths that could have lead back to the woman and her conviction?......Would like to know more about this.

    :+:Anneliese Michel:+:

    [21 September 1952–1 July 1976]

    [Second chapter twelfth verse of [
    :+:Philippians:+:]
    [Work out your own salvation, with fear and trembling]
    :+:Emily Rose:+:





  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Digital Discovery View Post
    She makes no mention of why she failed to call 9-1-1 via her cell phone or Ken's cell phone after discovering the body, but left the house to run to the neighboring farm. Upon reaching the neighboring farm, she asked the neighbor to call 9-1-1 for her and then left that house while the call was being made.
    That's usually the case. Let someone else find the body. Let someone else call the police. Disassociate yourself from the trauma so you don't have to deal with it. Next, run to the nearest comfort zone to help reinforce her state of denial while having to deal with the police. Memory lapses always come in handy, too. I'm thinking substance-induced psychotic disorder. Whatever powerful drug she took, by her own admission, didn't knock her out, but into another world.

    Anyone who says they took a powerful drug right before a murder should be required to be tested, just like in a DUI arrest.

  12. #12

    LVA and well lit paths

    What is LVA?
    Sorry for the acronym. LVA is Layered Voice Analysis. Simply put, it a type of lie detector test that tries to detect stress strictly through a person's voice, rather than through physical attributes. This type of test is very controversial. At least one study of its accuracy determined that it was no more accurate in detecting truth than chance. It also has its limitations. To be conclusive, the subject must talk for a period of time. It won't be accurate if the subject just answers "Yes" or "No." If the subject understands this limitation, then he/she can avoid answering questions by just giving one word answers. In the physical lie detector tests, the machine records your reaction to the question even when you don't give an answer and can be used with simple "Yes" or "No" answers, making the detection of stress in responses difficult to avoid.

    In the Juedes investigation, Det. Bean requested the typical lie detector test for everyone EXCEPT Cindy. Bean arranged for Cindy to take an LVA outside of the county with a different examiner. The examiner felt that Cindy may have been prepared to avoid the question of whether or not she knew Ken's killer because she answered it differently than all of the other questions. The examiner felt that the test accurately determined that she did not fire the fatal shot, but that she lied about everything else, including the insurance policies, her relationship with Ken and his children, the medications she took that night, etc. Det. Bean did not allow the results of any lie detector test to be released as a result of the FOIA request.

    When you say other paths? Do you mean other paths that lead away from the woman or other paths that could have lead back to the woman and her conviction?......Would like to know more about this.
    The Juedes Homicide was all about the money. Period. There was never any indication that Ken and Cindy quarreled and she never claimed violence between them. The intensive planning years before the murder indicated that the murder had been well planned. Ken's finances in the years prior to his murder also indicate planning.

    When Ken met Cindy and agreed to become Randy's business partner in 2002, Ken had been a pharmacist for over 30 years. He spent very little on vacations, cars, clothing or hobbies. He was an intensive saver and whatever he saved he put into purchasing property. In 2002, he owned a 10-acre parcel of land nearby, over 120 acres of farmland that included a creek, and a custom three story home with a barn. He only owed $60,000.

    When Ken's brother, Don, opened Ken's probate within days of the murder in 2006, it was found that Ken was over $300,000 in debt. None of the $240,000 removed from the equity in his property was ever traced by detectives, even though his finances were well documented. The loss was attributed to his failed business venture as Randy's business partner. There was also another business partner, Ed, who had also lost nearly as much as Ken. That is $600,000.00 that went missing in three years.

    Ken and Ed had placed the financial business mis-dealings on Randy because that is what Cindy told them. Ken and Ed tried to recover their money in various ways. At the time of Ken's murder, Ken and Ed had successfully worked with the Wisconsin Department of Financial Institutions to bring an order for Security Fraud against Randy. Even after it was brought, no one in law enforcement acted on the order. About nine months before he was killed, Ken personally went into the Marathon County District Attorney's office with financial documents to request that she prosecute Randy's financial fraud. His request was ignored.

    Meanwhile, Ed, who lived in neighboring Clark County, was able to open an investigation into financial crimes there. When Ken was killed, Marathon County claimed jurisdiction of Ed's investigation, which they then closed without prosecution. Ken was scheduled to testify against Randy in three separate financial cases the month after he was killed. Randy knew this and publicly told Ken that if he continued, Randy would kill him. Ken continued and was killed.

    After Marathon County took control of the financial crimes case started in Clark County and killed it, Ed hired two private detectives that specialized in uncovering financial fraud to look at the company's finances and find out where his $300,000 had gone. They determined that there was financial fraud and offered their findings to Marathon County. Their findings were ignored.

    Ken's sister, Laurie, was able to get access to some of Ken's financial documents through his probate and researched where his $300,000.00 had gone. She found that most of this money had been removed from his estate only a year before his death when Ken agreed to refinance his farm, removing $240,000 in cash. $90,000.00 was used to pay off credit cards and consumer debt, but Ken's credit statement showed that much of the debt was added to the cards during the same month that they were paid off. In other words, someone had taken out large cash withdrawals from Ken's credit cards and then directed the cards to be paid off with the refinance. Ken rarely used credit cards. The only other person who might have had access to his accounts would have been Cindy.

    After paying off the existing mortgage, the remaining cash was paid to Ken and Cindy with a check. No one ever found where the check was cashed or where the money went. The company that Cindy had worked with to do this refinance was later charged by the Wisconsin Attorney General's office for criminal financial fraud. Laurie requested that Ken's financial fraud be included in this State action, but her requests were ignored.

    As you can see, this isn't a case where the complicated nature of Ken and Ed's financial transactions would have been too much for Marathon County to investigate. Ed spent thousands of dollars with private investigators to do the investigation for them, but Marathon County refused to follow that path. Laurie spent thousands of hours tracing Ken's finances and offered them to investigators but Marathon County refused to follow that path. The Wisconsin Department of Financial Institutions brought an order against Randy, which still stands, but Marathon County did not follow that path either, even though it had been well researched by their legal team. Clark County investigators had uncovered criminal financial wrongdoing and presented their results to Marathon County investigators but, not only did they refuse to follow that path, they closed it down.

    All of these paths led to the conclusion that Cindy had at least one co-conspirator in Ken's death. This isn't speculation, it is in black and white financial documents. The question now isn't where the paths lead. The path is very wide and very well lit.

    The real question now is why did Marathon County refuse to follow these paths? This is especially puzzling because Wisconsin has "slayer statutes" that prevent anyone associated with a murder from collecting insurance benefits for that murder. Marathon County's failed investigation not only allowed financial crimes to happen BEFORE Ken's murder, but it allowed forged insurance policies to be paid out to Cindy AFTER Ken's murder.

    Something in this case just doesn't add up. At least Ken's family and friends don't seem to think so.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by ablewasiereisawelba View Post
    That's usually the case. Let someone else find the body. Let someone else call the police. Disassociate yourself from the trauma so you don't have to deal with it. Next, run to the nearest comfort zone to help reinforce her state of denial while having to deal with the police. Memory lapses always come in handy, too. I'm thinking substance-induced psychotic disorder. Whatever powerful drug she took, by her own admission, didn't knock her out, but into another world.

    Anyone who says they took a powerful drug right before a murder should be required to be tested, just like in a DUI arrest.
    So true.

    It also seemed strange to me that they never asked her to go into the Sheriff's department for questioning in the days and weeks after the murder. They also did not do any residue testing on her hands. Does this seem unusual to you?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Digital Discovery View Post
    Ken Juedes was found dead at his home in Unity, Wisconsin, on August 30, 2006. At the time of his death, he was scheduled to testify in three separate legal actions against his business partner, Randy Landwehr, regarding embezzlement and securities fraud relating to Monster Hall Raceway. Randy publicly threatened to kill Ken if Ken continued with these civil actions. Cindy Ewer Schulz, who lived with Ken at the time of the murder, was discovered to be in collusion with Randy and Randy's sister, Janet Kneiss. In the two years prior to the murder, Cindy had arranged for five separate life/accidental policies naming her as primary beneficiary, totaling almost $1,000,000.00. Three of those insurance applications containing probable forged signatures.
    Ken's body was found unclothed on his bed, lying face up, even though the fatal wound was in his lower back. Cindy reported Ken's death the morning after he was killed and admitted to being at Ken's home during the murder, claiming she did not hear any shotgun blasts. When EMT's arrived in response to the 9-1-1 call that morning, the floors were still wet from an apparent cleaning. Ken had security cameras at his house, but Cindy admitted to turning them off several days before the murder. She claimed that the digital cameras made too much noise. Ken also was caring for foster children at his house, but Cindy had them removed a week before the murder without explanation. Cindy had no verified alibi for the night of the murder and told conflicting stories about her actions after the body was found.
    In spite of these suspicious circumstances, upon arrival at the scene, Marathon County investigators, led by Detective Greg Bean, did not ask Cindy to come in for questioning and did not test her hands for residue. Investigators never interviewed Ken's father, who died a year later. They submitted a false interview with Ken's sister into the case file. They did not interview Ken's closest friend or housekeeper for a year after Ken's murder. They failed to respond to call into the tip line from an ex-employee who had witnessed Cindy and Randy's collusion.
    On the day Ken's murder was reported, they allowed Cindy to remain resting at a neighbor's house (where she took a short nap) and then allowed Cindy's friends and family free access to the crime scene later that night, even though the murder weapon and shotgun casings had not been recovered. After a cursory autopsy of Ken's body by a private physician, Marathon County released the body to Cindy for immediate cremation. The entire 120acre farm was released to Cindy on the day after the body was found. Neighbors witnessed smoke from her destruction of property on the farm for days afterward.
    Ken's will, which left his estate to his children, was never found. Instead, a month after the murder, Cindy submitted a copy of a will which had never been seen before to Ken's probate case. The will lsupposedly eft Ken's estate to her.Ken had never mentioned the existence of the will to his friends or family and his signature on the document was determined to be a probable forgery. The signature of one of the witnesses on this will was proven to be a forgery by the witness's testimony and work records.
    After six months passed without Marathon County making an arrest in the case, the insurance companies still refused to pay benefits to Cindy. Greg Bean then arranged for Cindy to take a Layered Voice Analysis in a nearby county. The detective administering the LVA determined that Cindy did not kill Ken, but also determined that Cindy avoided answering questions regarding co-conspirators. The LVA also determined that Cindy's answers to all other questions were lies. The results of the LVA were given to Greg Bean but not released through a FOIA. However, a two page internal law enforcement document stating that the LVA determined Cindy had not killed Ken was given to Cindy, who submitted it to the insurance companies through her lawyer. The insurance companies verified this fact with detectives and began paying out benefits within a month.
    Cindy's actions during the two years prior to the murder seem to indicate that she had planned to create enough circumstantial evidence against one of Ken's children from a prior marriage to facilitate an arrest of this innocent minor child. Due to a fortunate series of events, this son was not in the area on the night of the murder and was never arrested. As the case began to grow cold, Cindy brought a letter to Detective Bean that she claimed to have received from St. Paul, Minnesota. Ken's eldest son lived near St. Paul. Detective Bean issued a press release that stated the letter contained information that only the killer would have known. Documents released through a FOIA request revealed that it also contained a pubic hair. Ken's children would occasionally stay overnight at Ken's house and Cindy was known to have been collecting hair and other DNA-laden samples before the murder; at one point even pulling several hairs out of the head of Ken's friend when he bent over to put on his shoes! Detective Bean immediately admitted the letter into evidence and sent the pubic hair for DNA testing but the testing could not conclusively pinpoint the owner. The case continued without arrest.

    I am looking for any information about several people involved in this case: Cindy Ewer Schulz, Randy Landwehr, Janet Kneiss and Detective Greg Bean of Marathon County. I want to be clear that the Greg Bean involved in this case is in no way related to Detective Greg Bean of the Bellevue, Washington, PD. To my knowledge, the Greg Bean involved in Ken's investigation has only been involved in Wisconsin law enforcement investigations. I believe that his father is Howard Bean, who also was a law enforcement officer in Central Wisconsin and is now retired.
    Doing some research but wanted to ask you about this...

    Quote....Ken's body was found unclothed on his bed, lying face up, even though the fatal wound was in his lower back.......End of quote.

    According to this july 2013 report Ken was killed with two shotgun blasts in the chest.
    Double barrel perhaps?
    http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com/...nightmare-case

    Found this to be interesting from the link.

    The couple fostered a number of troubled teenage boys in their home; one of the boys, who had been staying with a parent temporarily, was expected to return to the Juedes’ home that night, she said.
    “I can prove why I slept in ‘the duckling’ that night,” Schulz-Juedes said. “Ken told me to hunker down and get some rest, because if (the boy) came home that night he would have been screaming and yelling and disruptive, because that’s the way things are with these kids. I was on medication and needed my rest.”
    When she gave the above statement I would bet she forgot there were no boys staying at the house at the time of the murder. In fact the LEOs stated they were removed about a week before the murder. I say she slipped and forgot when trying to keep herself straight with her constant lying. Only two people know about this conversation and the other one is dead.

    But then I read this....

    According to police records, there were no foster children placed in the home after Aug. 24, 2006 — nearly a week before Juedes’ death

    Hum. Older woman, young troubled teenage boys, nice home, lots of money, lots of promises, lots of sex perhaps. I have seen it before.

    Since this is a cold case going to think wayyyyy outside the box for a moment.

    Can you tell us the result from the investigation into whether or not she may have had one of the troubled teenage boys kill her husband? Or Can you tell us if there was an investigation into whether any of the teenage boys that were staying there before being taken out a week or so before the murder was investigated. Questioned as to what they may know or any information they may be able to supply since they were staying there for a period of time?

    And please don't tell me the teenage boys were not questioned at all to the best of your knowledge. I would find that to be almost unimaginable no one asked them any questions concerning the murder.
    Last edited by :+:MrTT:+:; 03-01-2014 at 09:53 AM.

    :+:Anneliese Michel:+:

    [21 September 1952–1 July 1976]

    [Second chapter twelfth verse of [
    :+:Philippians:+:]
    [Work out your own salvation, with fear and trembling]
    :+:Emily Rose:+:




  15. #15

    Foster Boys

    Quote Originally Posted by :+:MrTT:+: View Post
    According to this july 2013 report Ken was killed with two shotgun blasts in the chest.
    Double barrel perhaps?
    http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com/...nightmare-case
    This confusion is in a number of news reports and comes from the detectives releasing statements that he was shot twice in the "torso." Reporters assumed this meant chest and the detectives never corrected the published articles.

    The FOIA release had documents showing that there were two entrance wounds: one entering his middle left back and one in the front/side of his chest. Although either could have killed it, a description of the crime scene suggested that the one in his back was fatal. The position of the body when it was found and lack of blood splatter in the room suggests that he was killed outside of the bedroom and then his body was positioned on the bed after death. The second wound on his chest travelled laterally through his chest and exited at the base of his neck. Several drops of blood on the floor nearby in line with the track of the wadding indicated that this was probably done while the body was laying face up on the bed. The angle of the path, almost parallel to the floor might indicate that the shot was fired with the gun off the shoulder to avoid shoulder bruising.

    Quote Originally Posted by :+:MrTT:+: View Post
    Can you tell us the result from the investigation into whether or not she may have had one of the troubled teenage boys kill her husband? Or Can you tell us if there was an investigation into whether any of the teenage boys that were staying there before being taken out a week or so before the murder was investigated. Questioned as to what they may know or any information they may be able to supply since they were staying there for a period of time?

    And please don't tell me the teenage boys were not questioned at all to the best of your knowledge. I would find that to be almost unimaginable no one asked them any questions concerning the murder.
    Yes, the detectives did question the foster boys. I know very little about them, but the FOIA release indicated that there were six at the farm during the two years that she cared for them. None were there for the full time, and it seemed as though she never had more than three at the farm at any one time.

    From the interview summaries done by the detectives, the boys' responses seem natural and expected. They were unanimous in their appreciation of Ken, but seemed wary of Cindy's mood swings and temper.

    I think they were eliminated as suspects because of alibis. One was in a care situation that had video cameras. One of the boys died in Cindy's care before the murder. The other four were probably also in supervised situations.

    Cindy has given various statements about how many, when and if the foster boys were scheduled to return. Two other sources confirmed for me that the boys were removed from the home almost exactly a week before the murder.

    This removal seemed contradictory to me at first. It was clear that Cindy had planned to have them considered as potential suspects. She told several people very theatrical stories about how frightened she was that they would try to kill her and Ken in the middle of the night. None of those stories made sense to the people listening, however, since she never seemed afraid enough to have them removed during the two years that she cared for them.

    In general, people were used to and accepted "Cindy's stories." Her past employer told me that she had once gotten time off from work after she came in with a very theatrical display of grief when her ex-husband died. This display lasted for days and her sympathetic co-workers even bought her flowers to comfort her. The sympathy ended, however, when one of the co-workers met the ex-husband at the store some time later alive and well.

    So why did she need the foster boys out of the house a full week before the murder? If she was truly trying to frame them, then it would have been better to have at least one at the house on the night of the murder, possibly drugged so that he would have been the one to report the murder.

    One possible explanation is that she was unable to leave the farm as long as they were there because they needed supervision. Ed said that Cindy took an unexplained 2 1/2 to 3 day trip exactly one week prior to the murder. Cindy refused to tell Ed where she was going or the purpose of the trip, just that she had to go. Nothing about this trip was not recorded in the interview summaries with Cindy done by the detectives. Even more curious, the detectives specifically worded the subpoenas for Cindy's phone records to begin only a few days before the murder and exactly after she returned from this trip.

    Thanks for your comments. I really appreciate your thoughts and alternative suggestions -- they really help me avoid tunnel vision!
    Last edited by bessie; 03-02-2014 at 04:44 PM. Reason: fixed broken quote

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