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  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~n/t~ View Post
    Why are you shocked? He's proclaiming his innocence. I don't believe there was anything in the interview that would incriminate him at trial. It will be whatever physical evidence found that will (if any)

    1 - He said he didn't know Holly

    2 - He said he and ZA were drug buddies

    3 - He said Dylan hated his brother

    Did I miss anything that you feel would sway the jury to a guilty verdict from that interview?

    His attorney said he has an alibi. That, IMO, may be his downfall, if the alibi is weak.

    Strange that JA didn't say he did in the interview.

    Well, for one thing, if it's proven that he DID know Holly, then his found Jesus credibility is blown.
    We will never forget the missing.

  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~n/t~ View Post
    I think motive will be a big factor at trial. I still fail to see what possible motive 2 and possibly 3 or more would plan such a hideous, cruel crime against a beautiful young woman. Why was Holly their target?
    I think the jury will want to know why she was killed, certainly. But, unfortunately, horrific crimes committed for unfathomable reasons have become common enough that I don't think knowing motive would be a deal-breaker for conviction.
    We will never forget the missing.

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by maskedwoman View Post
    I think the jury will want to know why she was killed, certainly. But, unfortunately, horrific crimes committed for unfathomable reasons have become common enough that I don't think knowing motive would be a deal-breaker for conviction.
    Depending on how strong the evidence is against the perp (s). IMO
    Justice for Holly Bobo🎀

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~n/t~ View Post
    Depending on how strong the evidence is against the perp (s). IMO
    I think that's rather obvious for any trial. Not just this one.
    We will never forget the missing.

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by maskedwoman View Post
    I think that's rather obvious for any trial. Not just this one.
    Exactly my point. Someone posted that some people are just mean and evil. That's not a good enough imo

    The prosecution will need a strong case including motive in order to prevail especially if it's a DP case.
    Justice for Holly Bobo🎀

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wonless View Post
    If HS is correct in her ID of ZA, that shows a pattern, like ZA was out to kidnap an attractive female...I may be grasping for straws, but what else is there motive wise that we know for sure?
    I still believe it was revenge of some sort. I have nothing to back it up and I'm just going by gut feeling. If ZA acted alone, I'd be more inclined to believe it was of a sexual nature. But in this case we have 2 or 3 or more involved. Makes no sense to me.
    Justice for Holly Bobo🎀

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~n/t~ View Post
    Exactly my point. Someone posted that some people are just mean and
    evil. That's not a good enough imo

    The prosecution will need a strong case including motive in order to prevail especially if it's a DP case.
    It seems like to me that the DA wouldn't have filed the charges if he didn't have sufficient evidence to convict. jmo. The DA only gets one chance at these bottom feeders, so IMO he does have a strong case. Does motive have to be proven to ensure a conviction? Not really. IMO, anyone who has followed this case knows what the motive was behind Holly's abduction and subsequent murder. They wanted to obtain that which was unobtainable. Holly would never had dated any of these guys, and they knew it. By abducting Holly, they were able to live out their drug fueled sexual fantasies. All is jmo, btw.
    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.



    Anxiety is the cousin visiting from out of town that depression felt obligated to bring to the party.

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suthrnqt View Post
    It seems like to me that the DA wouldn't have filed the charges if he didn't have sufficient evidence to convict. jmo. The DA only gets one chance at these bottom feeders, so IMO he does have a strong case. Does motive have to be proven to ensure a conviction? Not really. IMO, anyone who has followed this case knows what the motive was behind Holly's abduction and subsequent murder. They wanted to obtain that which was unobtainable. Holly would never had dated any of these guys, and they knew it. By abducting Holly, they were able to live out their drug fueled sexual fantasies. All is jmo, btw.
    I'll respectfully disagree with your opinion of motive. As for sufficient evidence, they may have enough to arrest. As for a conviction, we'll have to wait for trial.

    We've been shocked many times.
    Justice for Holly Bobo🎀

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~n/t~ View Post
    Exactly my point. Someone posted that some people are just mean and evil. That's not a good enough imo

    The prosecution will need a strong case including motive in order to prevail especially if it's a DP case.
    Well, we don't yet know if they are going for the DP. They just said they are considering it. So, I don't think we're yet at the point where there's a debate to be effectively made for whether or not they can mount a DP case, since they clearly aren't yet sure either.

    For a non-DP case, I believe motive is a "nice to have" rather than a "must have". If the evidence is strong enough, WHAT they did will be much more important to the jury than WHY they did it.

    That is just my opinion based on my own time as a juror in a 1st degree murder trial. Proof of what the murderers did was much more important to us than why they did it. In fact, it was that lack of proof that caused us to deadlock on one defendant. He eventually pled guilty to a lesser offense, so I surmise he was also guilty, but they didn't have enough evidence against him to get 12 guilty votes.

    The idea that some people are just mean and evil may be somewhat simplistic, but it's also true. In a time when people are killed for not letting someone merge into traffic, or a teacher is murdered for keeping someone after class, it isn't always possible for us to understand WHY the murderer did what they did.

    Let me give you this example: let's say they have firm, irrefutable proof that Holly was at ZA's house, endured unspeakable horror, and was murdered there. Do you really need to know WHY in order to put the animal away? Because I sure wouldn't. Would I like to know why they did it? Sure, I would. Would I HAVE to know to vote guilty? Certainly not. And I think that part of it really is that simple.
    We will never forget the missing.

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by maskedwoman View Post
    Well, we don't yet know if they are going for the DP. They just said they are considering it. So, I don't think we're yet at the point where there's a debate to be effectively made for whether or not they can mount a DP case, since they clearly aren't yet sure either.

    For a non-DP case, I believe motive is a "nice to have" rather than a "must have". If the evidence is strong enough, WHAT they did will be much more important to the jury than WHY they did it.

    That is just my opinion based on my own time as a juror in a 1st degree murder trial. Proof of what the murderers did was much more important to us than why they did it. In fact, it was that lack of proof that caused us to deadlock on one defendant. He eventually pled guilty to a lesser offense, so I surmise he was also guilty, but they didn't have enough evidence against him to get 12 guilty votes.

    The idea that some people are just mean and evil may be somewhat simplistic, but it's also true. In a time when people are killed for not letting someone merge into traffic, or a teacher is murdered for keeping someone after class, it isn't always possible for us to understand WHY the murderer did what they did.

    Let me give you this example: let's say they have firm, irrefutable proof that Holly was at ZA's house, endured unspeakable horror, and was murdered there. Do you really need to know WHY in order to put the animal away? Because I sure wouldn't. Would I like to know why they did it? Sure, I would. Would I HAVE to know to vote guilty? Certainly not. And I think that part of it really is that simple.
    BBM = motive

    As for your example, motive would be required to prove who did it. If they have more than one suspect, it'll be the blame game.

    Believe me when I say I'm playing devil's advocate here. I want these animals put away as much as anyone else here but as some of you know, I don't trust the authorities in this case. Never did from day 1.
    Justice for Holly Bobo🎀


  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~n/t~ View Post
    BBM = motive

    As for your example, motive would be required to prove who did it. If they have more than one suspect, it'll be the blame game.

    Believe me when I say I'm playing devil's advocate here. I want these animals put away as much as anyone else here but as some of you know, I don't trust the authorities in this case. Never did from day 1.
    I find it curious that you didn't speak to anything else I said, but okay. We'll call it a day and agree to disagree.
    We will never forget the missing.

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by maskedwoman View Post
    I find it curious that you didn't speak to anything else I said, but okay. We'll call it a day and agree to disagree.
    Like what? DP? I agree we don't know yet
    Justice for Holly Bobo🎀

  13. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~n/t~ View Post
    Like what? DP? I agree we don't know yet
    The fact that in my experience as a juror, it was much more important to us to know that they did it, rather than why.

    In fact, now that I think about it, I can recall quite a few juries finding someone not guilty because they didn't think the prosecution proved someone did what they were charged with, but I can't recall hearing a jury find someone not guilty because they didn't think the prosecution proved WHY the person did it.

    Just something to think about.
    We will never forget the missing.

  14. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by maskedwoman View Post
    The fact that in my experience as a juror, it was much more important to us to know that they did it, rather than why.

    In fact, now that I think about it, I can recall quite a few juries finding someone not guilty because they didn't think the prosecution proved someone did what they were charged with, but I can't recall hearing a jury find someone not guilty because they didn't think the prosecution proved WHY the person did it.

    Just something to think about.
    The Role of "Motive" in Criminal Law
    "Motive" generally refers to the reason behind an illegal act. For example, a person's need to raise money quickly to pay off a bookie may be the motive for a robbery, while revenge for a personal affront may be the motive for a physical attack. Prosecutors often offer motive evidence as circumstantial evidence that a defendant acted intentionally or knowingly. Judges and jurors are more likely to believe that a defendant had mens rea if they know that the defendant had a motive to commit an illegal act. By the same token, defendants may offer evidence showing that they had no motive to commit a crime and then argue that the lack of a motive demonstrates reasonable doubt of guilt.
    If the defendant had a motive to kill the victim, such evidence is relevant to prove that he did in fact kill the victim. The defense may point to others who also had possible motives. Or they may argue the defendant's motive was not sufficient to drive him to kill.

    Even though it is not required to prove the defendant guilty, motive is often heavily debated at trial. That's because people have a strong need to know why. And in our jury system, people are the ones deciding guilt.

    Killing is an extreme act, generally seen as outside the norm of human behavior. It is natural for a jury to want to know why someone would commit such an act. It is also natural for jurors to want to hear a good reason before they feel comfortable convicting someone of murder, potentially sentencing him to life in prison, or even death.

    Opportunity to commit the crime is a little more obvious. Opportunity is also a basic thing that people want to see prove, even though it is not required.

    Was the defendant in the area where the crime occurred? Was he familiar with the area? Did he have transportation, if necessary? Was there no alibi to verify the defendant was elsewhere? Or if the defendant did have an alibi, was it an alibi that could be challenged?

    Although these questions are not technically required to be answered to prove a defendant guilty, they are things that any jury would want to know. The prosecution should therefore answer those questions if it wants to secure a conviction. And the defense would benefit from keeping such questions active in the jury's mind, if possible, raising doubt about whether the defendant could have committed the crime.

    The questions of motive and opportunity show that criminal trials are often about something more than strictly determining whether the prosecution has proven the elements of the crime. They are also about answering the very human questions of why people commit crimes.



    Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6652179
    http://ezinearticles.com/?Motive-and...er?&id=6652179

    http://www.justia.com/criminal/docs/...m/300/370.html
    Justice for Holly Bobo🎀

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~n/t~ View Post
    I still believe it was revenge of some sort. I have nothing to back it up and I'm just going by gut feeling. If ZA acted alone, I'd be more inclined to believe it was of a sexual nature. But in this case we have 2 or 3 or more involved. Makes no sense to me.
    I respectfully disagree with your entire post. 'Nuff said.
    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.



    Anxiety is the cousin visiting from out of town that depression felt obligated to bring to the party.

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