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  1. #91
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    7 Secrets from the Pros on Keeping Your Children Safe from Abduction & Seduction


    Secrets 4-7

    4. Boys do not report sexual molestation as often as girls do.

    In fact, boys report molestation four times less often than girls. There are two main reasons: one is that boys are afraid that their parents will restrict their freedom and more closely supervise their lives in their efforts to keep their sons safe. In one real life situation, a boy had been approached by a man a couple of times on his way to school. The boy told his younger brother that a strange man was bothering him, but instructed his brother not to tell his parents. One day soon afterward, the boy was missing and never seen again.

    The second reason that boys do not tell that they have been approached and/or molested is the stigma attached to such a degrading assault by a man. Boys do not want to be called "homosexual" or be ridiculed by their peers.


    5. Child molesters are rarely convicted.

    What's more, when they are convicted they often serve very short sentences. In the words of one habitual child abductor/molester, Wesley Allen Dodd: "In a 16 year period, I was reported to police 12 times, made full confessions the last 11 times, was arrested only 6 times, and prosecuted only 3 times, spending no more than 4 months in jail twice, and only 19 days the other time."

    Molesters are rarely convicted largely due to four issues:

    a. Children make poor witnesses. It goes without saying that children are too young to participate competently in the very adult world of the courts and of sexual abuse.

    b. Family members back down as witnesses. "Due to internal family pressures, often family members will not follow through with child molestation charges," noted Major Jackson, who has successfully prosecuted hundreds of cases over the years. "Often the wives are afraid to break up the family and be left having to financially support her children on her own."

    c. The judicial system does not understand the problem. "Most family law attorneys are untrained and unprepared to evaluate or present the evidence of child abuse," says Goldstein. "They simply do not recognize the complex issues involved in child abuse cases." Further, most judges don't understand the dynamics of sexual abuse, because most judges never see cases like this.

    d. Societal perceptions. As Special Agent Ken Lanning, FBI Behavioral Science Unit, has said: "The final frustration for the police officer comes in the sentencing of a convicted child molester. If a man lured 20 children into his home, tied them down, and smashed their knees with a hammer so that they were physically cripples for the rest of their lives, society would demand that such an offender be locked up forever or even executed. But if a man lured 20 children into his home seduced them, lowered their inhibitions, and had sex with them so that they were emotional cripples for the rest of their lives, it's a different story. Particularly when character witnesses testify that the defendant is a nice man who goes to church every Sunday, is kind to his neighbors, and works hard. The children have no physical injuries for the jury to see. The result is that such offenders are sentenced to little or no jail time."


    6. Parents have unknowingly sent their children into potentially dangerous situations.

    We like to think of our world as mostly safe, with only a few potentially dangerous situations from which to steer clear. But today's world is not like the world when we were children. We cannot let our children walk home from school alone or play in the nearby woods without fear. We can't even let them play unsupervised in a video game arcade or allow the teenager down the street to baby-sit without carefully following up on personal references.

    From baby-sitters to public bathrooms, parents have unwittingly helped their children to be victimized. One devastated grandmother told us a story of how a trusted male family friend, who often baby-sat her grandson, was found to have been abusing the child at every opportunity.

    Public restrooms are among the most dangerous places you can send a child alone. It gives child molesters easy access to their victims, the privacy to commit their act, and the ability to get out and get lost in a crowd. (One side note about public restrooms: In a report from a Dallas policeman, one of the local gang initiation rites involved waiting in a mall bathroom for the next young boy to walk in alone and then cut off his penis; the next boy to walk in was eight years old.)

    The bottom line: parents today have to take every precaution to ensure that their children's safety and innocence is not compromised in a world that can be less than kind.


    7. Children who are given the wisdom to think on their feet are the safest children of all.

    Every morning for years, one mother told her daughter before she walked out the door to school: "If anyone ever tries to grab you, hit, kick, scream, run. Do anything you have to, but get away." Her concern for her daughter's personal safety paid off - possibly saving her daughter's life from the hands of a habitual child abductor and murderer. One morning while walking to school a man approached the 12-year old. After talking to her for a few minutes he reached out to grab her, she moved quickly and he got a hold of her backpack. She quickly wiggled out of her backpack and ran, screaming down the street. A man helped her and got the license plate number of the would-be abductor's van.

    Other children have also thought fast on their feet, and stayed safe, in dangerous situations:

    In one news report, a ten-year-old boy saved his five-year-old brother from being abducted when an old man pulled up in a car, grabbed the five-year-old, and threw him in the back of the car. The 10-year-old sprung to action and "kicked him where it hurts."

    Police say that once a child, who was being abducted, kicked off one of his shoes. Thanks to the boy's quick thinking the police were able to identify where the child was last seen and get more details from people in that area on the type of car the abductor was driving. Then the police were able to locate the child and apprehend the abductor
    So you think that the world owes you something, Hey baby so do I
    But you sink like a stone from the weight of the debt
    Its so heavy it makes you cry
    And you think that your innocence is somewhere
    south of the Georgia line
    But for all of the days that you spent headed south its still five below when you open your mouth


  2. #92
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    This is scary, scary stuff. As a normal person, my mind just kind of shuts down as I read it, thinking I don't want to know this. As a parent, I know if have to read it, I have to know this so I can help protect my kids, and the kids around me. God help us...


  3. #93
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    Another thought... has anyone started a "child identification program" at their school or other organization? I have been thinking for months, ever since I started reading this forum, that I really need to initiate one of the child identification programs at my son's school, with fingerprints, phtotographs, etc. Does anyone have any advice?


  4. #94
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    Past sex offender charged with indecent exposure

    GALLATIN — A man convicted of molesting an 11-year-old girl in Texas in 1997 has been arrested in Goodlettsville's Moss-Wright Park and charged with indecent exposure, police said.

    Kevin Alan Cole, 41, was being held in the Sumner County Jail yesterday. He faces a hearing Oct. 6 in Sumner County General Sessions Court.

    Police said Cole's identification showed that his address was in Demotte, Ind. His listing on Texas' online sex offender registry says he was convicted in 1997 of one count of indecency with a child. The listing also says that he lives in Indiana.

    Meanwhile, Indiana's online sex offender registry also says Cole lives in Demotte and that he had been sentenced to six years in prison for the Texas conviction.

    Cole was alone at the park Tuesday, near the football field, when police say a woman saw him and called police.

    ''We're not sure what he's doing here. He may be just passing through. If that's the case, he would not have to register as a sex offender in Tennessee,'' Goodlettsville police Capt. Ken Jenkins said.

    Cole could not be reached for comment as Sumner County Jail rules prohibit inmate interviews

    http://www.tennessean.com/local/arch...nt_ID=39564149
    So you think that the world owes you something, Hey baby so do I
    But you sink like a stone from the weight of the debt
    Its so heavy it makes you cry
    And you think that your innocence is somewhere
    south of the Georgia line
    But for all of the days that you spent headed south its still five below when you open your mouth


  5. #95
    Johnny,

    I have just read thru all the posts finally...

    I may have missed it, but do you know if the Oldhams or Martin Boyd ever went thru a lie detector test?


  6. #96
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    New information should be coming out soon...Thursday a person of high interest was served with a search warrant and the vehicle, aboat and a shed was searched, also luminol was used to try and find blood stains....also the person has been subjected to two lie detector tests......the person came forward with a tip about where they said they thought they saw Tabitha.........this man has been written about in a previous article but his name has not been used.
    So you think that the world owes you something, Hey baby so do I
    But you sink like a stone from the weight of the debt
    Its so heavy it makes you cry
    And you think that your innocence is somewhere
    south of the Georgia line
    But for all of the days that you spent headed south its still five below when you open your mouth


  7. #97
    from the 8/20 article...This has to be the guy of current interest..

    Another person of interest whom police have interviewed lives nearly a mile away from the Tuders family. Because he has no criminal charges pending and might actually be able to help police crack the case, the Scene is not identifying him by name. But even he acknowledges that he's a natural suspect for two reasons: One, he claims to have seen Tabitha on April 29, the Tuesday morning she disappeared, on the corner of Lillian and 14th. Second, he has befriended several young boys and girls on both his street and Tabitha's. One of the girls, whose mother is his friend, lives just two houses away from Tabitha and used to be one of her closest friends. Finally, at press time, the Scene learned that the man and his wife are under investigation by the state Department of Children Services for child abuse. According to spokeswoman Carla Aaron, the agency currently has custody of one of the couple's children and is working with law enforcement to complete the investigation.

    In an interview with the Scene, this person says that he had been around Tabitha and "might wave" to her when he saw her. Still, he says, he had never spoken with her and didn't take her fishing, fix her bike or do any of the things he has done for other children in the neighborhood. Throughout the course of the interview, he seemed helpful and friendly. He may well have nothing to hide. But a part of his story seems relevant to the investigation. He says that before he saw Tabitha at around 7:45 on the morning she disappeared, he picked up a boy at 19th and Shelby who had missed his bus to Stratford High School. He didn't know the name of the boy, only that he was black and that he was in ninth grade at the time. He says, though, that the boy knew who he was and called him by name. The problem with his story is that if he took the student to Stratford from 19th and Shelby, he was far afield from Tabitha's route to the bus that morning. How, then, could he have seen her?

    Even if he could answer that question, this man has elicited the attention of Team Tabitha, the citizen-led volunteer group that's working with the family and police on the case. Johnny White, the family friend who has interviewed dozens of neighbors as a part of the group's search efforts, says that this mysterious eyewitness might hold some important clues. If his story of spotting Tabitha at 7:45 that morning on her normal route to the bus is correct, then it dispels once and for all the theory that Tabitha ran away. But White has concerns about him, because White has picked up reports that the man has disparaged the 13-year-old girl in conversations with others. In fact, talking with Scene reporters, the man noted crudely--complete with hand gestures--that Tabitha was beginning to develop physically, and he speculated that she may not have been as innocent as everyone assumes.

    "There are variances in his story in how he approached the family and how he approached the police department," White says. "Plus, he has spoken ill of Tabitha, and no one else has. And when he talks about Tabitha, it's as if he knows her very well, but when you talk to Tabitha's family, they don't believe she knew him."


  8. #98
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    On target Doyle!
    So you think that the world owes you something, Hey baby so do I
    But you sink like a stone from the weight of the debt
    Its so heavy it makes you cry
    And you think that your innocence is somewhere
    south of the Georgia line
    But for all of the days that you spent headed south its still five below when you open your mouth


  9. #99
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    Suspects Questioned

    Police track neighbors and a Memphis prostitution ring in missing girl case



    Last Thursday, on a pleasant, late summer evening, Metro police vans and cars pulled up outside a tiny all-brick duplex overlooking East Nashville's Shelby Bottoms Park, a few hundred yards up a hill from the Cumberland River. Police detectives had an appointment with a maintenance worker whom they had labeled an "active person of interest" in the disappearance of Tabitha Tuders. Because there are no criminal charges pending against him and because he might actually be able to help police crack the case, the Scene is not identifying him by name. But even he has admitted that he's a natural suspect.


    Nearly six months after the 13-year-old A student vanished on the way to her East Nashville bus stop, police investigators are no closer to figuring out what happened than they were the night they arrived at her family home. But police continue to track so-called "people of interest," a category that, among others, includes the maintenance worker, a husband and wife accused of raping a minor, and a notorious gang of ringleaders in a Memphis-to-Nashville prostitution outfit. Even while the police department's efforts have yet to yield a breakthrough in the case--and at times, have appeared impotent--investigators still haven't forgotten about the sweet blond teenager who loved scary movies, Vince Gill and, perhaps most of all, her parents Bo and Debra.

    Criminal investigations are all about figuring out who the suspects are and who they aren't. After last Thursday's search, the police might be easing up on the maintenance worker, who, through his previous words and actions, had elicited the attention of investigators, his neighbors, even Tabitha's family. Last Thursday, when the police arrived at the maintenance worker's home, they told his neighbors to turn off their lights. According to a pair of sources, investigators needed a dark setting because they were using a substance called Luminol that can detect traces of blood not visible to the naked eye. It can also detect how the blood splattered, often providing clues as to the exact nature of the crime. According to two neighborhood sources, police used Luminol on the man's car, his fishing boat and his shed. It's not clear if they used it in his house.

    Police spokesman Don Aaron wouldn't comment on what the officers were doing at the man's house, except to say that the man was "very cooperative." In fact, Aaron says that the police didn't even need to obtain a search warrant. The man allowed the police to conduct their search. According to a source, he also volunteered to take a lie detector test the following day and, while Aaron wouldn't confirm that, the man told the Scene a month earlier that "he had nothing to hide." Aaron does say, though, that "the level of interest in him has lessened to some extent."

    Why all the suspicion to start? Well, for one, the man, who lives only a mile or so away from Tabitha's Lillian Street home, claims to have seen Tabitha on the corner of Lillian and 14th Street on the morning she disappeared. But by his own account, he was driving a teenage boy to Stratford High School that morning after picking him up at a bus stop at 19th and Shelby. The problem with that story is that if he took the student to Stratford from 19th and Shelby, he was far afield from Tabitha's route to the bus. How then did he see her?

    Second, he has befriended several young girls and boys on both his street and Tabitha's, buying them bicycles and taking them fishing. One of those girls, whose mother is the man's friend, lives just two houses away from Tabitha and used to be one of her closest friends before the two had a falling out. Meanwhile, the man has disparaged the missing 13-year-old girl in conversations with others. In fact, talking with Scene reporters last month, he crudely noted, complete with hand gestures, that Tabitha was beginning to develop physically, and he speculated that she might not be as sweet and innocent as she's been portrayed.

    "He has spoken ill of Tabitha and no one else has," Johnny White, a spokesman for the Tuders family, said in an interview with the Scene last month. "And when he talks about Tabitha, it's as if he knows her very well, but when you talk with Tabitha's family, they don't believe she knew him."

    Finally, the man and his wife are currently under investigation by the state Department of Children's Services for an incident involving one of the couple's children. DCS is still working with law enforcement to complete the investigation. The man didn't return phone calls for comment, and his wife told the Scene that he had no interest in talking any more about the case.

    Amazingly, this man knew another person of interest in the Tabitha Tuders case, Timothy Oldham, who is now in jail on a rape charge. Oldham lived just five houses from Tabitha and was arrested on May 16 (after her disappearance) for raping a minor at his home. His own son walked in on him and caught him in the act, according to the arrest warrant. Police also arrested Oldham's wife Kim for playing a role in the crime, allegedly pressuring the young girl to remove her clothing, telling her that the husband "did not take 'no' for an answer." The two remain in custody awaiting trial.

    Both Timothy Oldham, who has been arrested at least 20 times, and his wife Kim are considered people of interest in the Tuders case, although none of the neighbors the Scene has interviewed ever remembers seeing Tabitha with them. Still, the very nature of the charges against the couple, their close proximity to Tabitha and the fact that they were not yet in jail the morning Tabitha disappeared make them a likely target of any police investigation.




    The police also have their sights set on the "Memphis Boys," a believed prostitution outfit with criminal activities in Nashville. People familiar with the investigation relay stories about the Memphis Boys that seem like the stuff of urban legend: One of the ring leaders supposedly drives a Gold Lexus, while another makes decisions from state prison. Meanwhile, the prostitutes are all branded with snake tattoos. But while the group's existence seems wrapped in bad movie imagery, police detectives acknowledge that they've responded to dozens of leads about the group. "We've received tips that people who run prostitutes both here and in Memphis have had something to do with Tabitha's disappearance," says youth services Capt. Karl Roller. "We have followed up on those leads." Detectives have interviewed several men believed to be associated with the group, while the Shelby County Sheriff's Office tracked down another. But none of those leads turned up anything. Just last week, a crack addict approached a member of Tabitha's family, talking again about the Memphis Boys and how they kidnapped the young girl. He has claimed to have seen her at a Dickerson Road hotel. The Scene also has received tips about the Memphis Boys.


    "We actually were responding to a tip about Tabitha being at a hotel, and we ended up finding a missing 19-year-old-girl from Oklahoma," says White, the Tuder family friend, who has looked for Tabitha in local housing projects and seedy hotels. "The girl was working as a prostitute, and there she was in a vehicle with one of the Memphis Boys."

    Police say there is no hard evidence linking the Memphis Boys to Tabitha's disappearance or even to people in her neighborhood. But it appears that the sheer volume of leads about the group has made it impossible for investigators to dismiss their involvement altogether. They even briefed Tabitha's family about the group. In fact, last July, Bo Tuders, Tabitha's brother Kevin, along with two family friends, went to Memphis to look for the missing girl.

    "We passed out flyers of Tabitha to prostitutes, but nobody had seen her," Bo Tuders says.

    His friend, Tim Crague, whose daughter Chelsea was one of Tabitha's best friends, also went on that trip to Memphis. "We were going on information we received from the police department that there were tips that she was with these guys and she was being run back and forth to Memphis," he says. "The police didn't suggest we go or suggest we don't go, so we went."

    Together, the group combed through the inner-city streets of Memphis, talking to prostitutes and other area inhabitants to see if there were any signs of Tabitha. "There were four of us, so we just watched each other's back. We had a child missing. We didn't worry about the rest," Crague says. "We knew it was a long shot, but we figured we'd beat the bushes as best we could."

    Police detectives acknowledge that they've chased some futile leads, but that happens in any investigation. Sometimes, though, the most ordinary tip can yield the most dramatic breakthrough. Right now, they continue to pour over a list of questionable figures--with no end in sight.

    http://www.nashvillescene.com/cgi-bi...ws:City_Limits
    just added the link for reference...
    Last edited by Doyle; 09-27-2003 at 10:10 AM.
    So you think that the world owes you something, Hey baby so do I
    But you sink like a stone from the weight of the debt
    Its so heavy it makes you cry
    And you think that your innocence is somewhere
    south of the Georgia line
    But for all of the days that you spent headed south its still five below when you open your mouth


  10. #100
    Join Date
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    So you think that the world owes you something, Hey baby so do I
    But you sink like a stone from the weight of the debt
    Its so heavy it makes you cry
    And you think that your innocence is somewhere
    south of the Georgia line
    But for all of the days that you spent headed south its still five below when you open your mouth


  11. #101
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    State ups Tuders reward
    By Skip Cauthorn, scauthorn@nashvillecitypaper.com
    September 30, 2003

    The state has upped the reward for leads in the disappearance of 13-year-old Tabitha Tuders by pitching in $10,000 for information leading to the conviction of any persons involved.

    The total reward, combined with local funds, has now approached the $16,000 mark.

    Tuders, a Bailey Middle School student, disappeared April 29 from her East Nashville home on Lillian Street. Tuders was last seen 7 a.m. April 29 when her father, Irvin Tuders, woke her for school.

    Police were called 10 hours later when the family was concerned because their daughter hadn’t returned home from Bailey Middle School. It was later discovered that Tabitha failed to board the bus at 14th & Boscobel streets shortly after 8 a.m. that day.

    Acting Metro Police Chief Deborah Faulkner along with District Attorney Torry Johnson made the request for state money last week of Gov. Phil Bredesen. In his capacity under state law, Bredesen announced the addition to the reward Monday.

    “The city through the attorney general has requested this and the mayor and I have talked about it several times and it’s just good to step in and I’m hoping this might jog someone to say something about the case to help to break this thing open,” said Bredesen Monday.

    The investigation of the case, according to Metro Police spokesperson Don Aaron, has made little progress in the past few weeks. But the additional reward money helps in such cases in raising awareness among the general public, he said.

    “We’re hoping this will re-focus [on] Tabitha Tuders’ disappearance and cause Nashvillians to reflect on whether they know anything about the case,” said Aaron. … “We have pursued numerous leads in the case. Unfortunately, many of the leads we’ve worked on in the past couple of weeks have failed.”

    Tuders’ disappearance did not qualify for the Amber Alert system, which uses networking across the nation to raise awareness of missing children, because there were no signs of abduction and police and family didn’t know the child was missing for 10 hours.

    The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children has faxed Tabitha’s missing child poster out to thousands of fax machines.

    Police say there is no evidence that the child packed any clothes or planned to leave.

    Mayor Bill Purcell expressed hope that the additional reward money could benefit the investigation.

    “Like any other state reward, it’s not done frequently but when it’s done it’s the kind of thing that can make a critical difference in encouraging people to come forward,” said Purcell. “Everyone’s focused on this and the hope is this will make the public focus even a little bit more than they have so far.”

    Metro has faced public scrutiny recently in its handling of the case. Purcell said everything possible is being done in the search.

    “Obviously these are things that … law enforcement should be in charge of,” said Purcell. “I’m satisfied that each level of government - the [Tennessee Bureau of Investigation], the [Federal Bureau of Investigation] and our local police department - have focused all the resources they believe required on this. Their collaboration, their cooperation has been seamless. … They’re putting the resources in this that are necessary.”

    Anyone with information that may assist in the Tuders investigation should contact Metro Police Department’s Youth Services Division at 862-7417.
    So you think that the world owes you something, Hey baby so do I
    But you sink like a stone from the weight of the debt
    Its so heavy it makes you cry
    And you think that your innocence is somewhere
    south of the Georgia line
    But for all of the days that you spent headed south its still five below when you open your mouth


  12. #102
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    A 42-year-old man faces burglary charges after being accused of sneaking into a church and stealing pictures of children who attend its day-care center.

    Police said the motive for the theft wasn't clear yesterday.

    Metro Burglary detectives arrested Mark S. Bedwell on Tuesday night, accusing him of stealing from the Westminster Presbyterian Church, 3900 West End Ave.

    Police said Bedwell sneaked into the church about 4 a.m. Oct. 3 and stole pictures of children that were inside classrooms in the church's day-care area. The photos were of children in a day-care program at the church.

    Police said the suspect was identified from a videotape from a church security camera.

    Bedwell was charged with one count of burglary and was being held in Metro Jail last night in lieu of $10,000 bail.

    Detectives were asking the public to contact them if anyone recognized Bedwell in connection with other crimes, especially in the West End area. They also are asking anyone who has had pictures of young children stolen in a break-in to call the Burglary Division at 862-7572 or Crime Stoppers at 74-CRIME

    http://www.police.nashville.org/news...r/10082003.htm
    So you think that the world owes you something, Hey baby so do I
    But you sink like a stone from the weight of the debt
    Its so heavy it makes you cry
    And you think that your innocence is somewhere
    south of the Georgia line
    But for all of the days that you spent headed south its still five below when you open your mouth


  13. #103
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    Father of murdered child comes to Nashville to help others



    http://www.wkrn.com/Global/story.asp...9&nav=1ugBITHu
    So you think that the world owes you something, Hey baby so do I
    But you sink like a stone from the weight of the debt
    Its so heavy it makes you cry
    And you think that your innocence is somewhere
    south of the Georgia line
    But for all of the days that you spent headed south its still five below when you open your mouth


  14. #104
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    Metro police say more charges may be on the way for a homeless man arrested earlier this week.



    Mark Bedwell was charged with the burglary of a church on West End Avenue. Detectives found pictures of small children taken from the church in his tent near the church.



    Friday, police said Bedwell, who's a registered sex offender in other states, could face additional charges for burglarizing other churches.



    The arrest highlighted a growing trend in that part of town. Homeless people have migrated from downtown to the West End area.



    Officials blame the re-location to increased crack-downs by police on the homeless downtown
    So you think that the world owes you something, Hey baby so do I
    But you sink like a stone from the weight of the debt
    Its so heavy it makes you cry
    And you think that your innocence is somewhere
    south of the Georgia line
    But for all of the days that you spent headed south its still five below when you open your mouth


  15. #105
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    News Briefly

    Bredesen helps in Tuders case


    On behalf of the state, the governor has anted up $10,000 in reward money to assist in the case of Tabitha Tuders, the East Nashville youngster who mysteriously disappeared five months ago. Only weeks earlier, Mayor Bill Purcell had been cool to the idea of boosting the paltry reward sum of $10,000 already being offered by public and private means. "The mayor talked to the police chief, who did not think that the additional reward money is necessary," Purcell's deputy mayor, Bill Phillips, told the Scene then. The state's contribution brings the total reward money for information about Tuders' whereabouts to $20,000.
    So you think that the world owes you something, Hey baby so do I
    But you sink like a stone from the weight of the debt
    Its so heavy it makes you cry
    And you think that your innocence is somewhere
    south of the Georgia line
    But for all of the days that you spent headed south its still five below when you open your mouth


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