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  1. #16
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    Oct 2005
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    The man who confessed to helping bury Dorothy's body was an Edward C. Glennoris, who was in prison in Rhode Island for extortion. I read his confession in the New York Times and I'm convinced he made it up. No body was found in the location he described and the day after the story ran he applied for parole, supposedly so he could help the police with their investigation. I think he was intending to flee. All the things he mentioned about Dorothy were things that were mentioned in the Times.

    Marilynilpa, I think I can help your research a little. I've found a Charles C. Meredith who was a physician living in Pittsburgh in 1910. I think he is the C.C. Meredith who was arrested in 1914. He appears to have been a leading citizen. There is a painting of him in a book on Pittsburgh's leading citizens. That doesn't mean of course that he didn't engage in unlawful practices. He was the only Charles C. Meredith listed in the 1910 census for Pittsburgh. He was 43 in 1910 and his wife's name was Laura.

    I've found an interesting coincidence in my research also. George Griscom Jr
    and his family were from Pittsburgh. It really makes me wonder if Dorothy did end up in that hospital.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susan Shock
    The man who confessed to helping bury Dorothy's body was an Edward C. Glennoris, who was in prison in Rhode Island for extortion. I read his confession in the New York Times and I'm convinced he made it up. No body was found in the location he described and the day after the story ran he applied for parole, supposedly so he could help the police with their investigation. I think he was intending to flee. All the things he mentioned about Dorothy were things that were mentioned in the Times.

    Marilynilpa, I think I can help your research a little. I've found a Charles C. Meredith who was a physician living in Pittsburgh in 1910. I think he is the C.C. Meredith who was arrested in 1914. He appears to have been a leading citizen. There is a painting of him in a book on Pittsburgh's leading citizens. That doesn't mean of course that he didn't engage in unlawful practices. He was the only Charles C. Meredith listed in the 1910 census for Pittsburgh. He was 43 in 1910 and his wife's name was Laura.

    I've found an interesting coincidence in my research also. George Griscom Jr
    and his family were from Pittsburgh. It really makes me wonder if Dorothy did end up in that hospital.
    Griscom's connection to Pittsburgh is what made me take the Dr. Meredith story more seriously than any of the other possibilities.

    The District Attorney certainly believed that Dorothy died in Dr. Meredith's hospital. I doubt he would publicly accuse such a prominent citizen of wrongdoing unless he was convinced of that man's guilt.

    I think there is a lot more to that story, and I hope to begin researching it next week.

  3. #18
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    Oct 2005
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    That is a good point. By the way the article in the Times also mentioned a Myrtle Allison who went into the hospital and never returned. Lutz asked Meredith one day how she was doing and he threw up his hands and said, "She's gone" The implication was that she had died, not left of her own volition. I wonder who this woman was. She was referred to as Mrs. Myrtle Allison. Another missing person.

  4. #19
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    Apr 2005
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    orange county, ny
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    Its truly fascinating how researching one case can lead to information on another. All I know of Dorothy's disappearance is what I have read here, however I found an article while looking into something else taht might be of interest. I haven't heard this mentioned elsewhere.

    From The Oklahoman, Feb 2, 1911--dateline Philadelphia, PA--It was said at police headquarters Wednesday night that Dorothy H.C. Arnold, the missing New York girl, was until recently in Philadelphia and had written to her father from this city.
    Francis R. Arnold, her father, and Captain of Detectives Souder, it is said, had a long-distance telephone talk last night during whcih it is declared Mr. Arnold said he had received a letter from his missing daughter postmarked Philadelphia. Captain Souder said he did not know the contents of the letter.
    "I will deny anything published about this case", said Captain Souder. "this letter was given in confidence and I will not discuss it. I do not want any publicity given the affair".

    A hoax? I have the link to the original story, and can PM to anyone interested, I just can't put it out the public or I'll go to jail.

  5. #20
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    Oct 2005
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    Please do pm link to that story Shadowangel, I would like to read it and include it in my research. It definitely sounds interesting. Thanks.

    Susan

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susan Shock
    Please do pm link to that story Shadowangel, I would like to read it and include it in my research. It definitely sounds interesting. Thanks.

    Susan
    You shall have it this evening, ma'am.

  7. #22
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    May 2005
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    Another article on this, don't know if it adds anything

    http://exploratoria.com/2004/12/doro...revisited.html

  8. #23
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    May 2005
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    and another one with a photo of her lover....SHOCKING!!!!!

    http://www.prairieghosts.com/arnold.html

  9. #24
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  10. #25
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    Could it be possible she found out she was pregnant and ran. When she found out her parents had reported her as missing, she could have contacted her parents and when they found out she was pregnant- her father disowned her? That could have been what led up to an abortion and could also explain why the father didn't want any discussion on it anymore. Then when she died in the hospital from the abortion- the father would then be especially firm in not talking about the case. The pregnancy alone would have caused a scandal, the father disowning her would have caused even more talk, and then with her death- he probably felt guilt as well as the shame of an "ruined" daughter.
    Did she have any siblings? Any other close family members?
    Just when I think that I have seen the most depraved things a human can do to another human, somebody posts a new story...........

    Why is it that when a custodial parent fails to provide for a child it is called neglect and is a criminal matter. But when a non custodial parent fails to provide it is called failure to support and is a civil matter?


    "Just when the caterpillar thought its world was over, it became a butterfly" ~ Michelle Knight


  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mysteriew
    Could it be possible she found out she was pregnant and ran. When she found out her parents had reported her as missing, she could have contacted her parents and when they found out she was pregnant- her father disowned her? That could have been what led up to an abortion and could also explain why the father didn't want any discussion on it anymore. Then when she died in the hospital from the abortion- the father would then be especially firm in not talking about the case. The pregnancy alone would have caused a scandal, the father disowning her would have caused even more talk, and then with her death- he probably felt guilt as well as the shame of an "ruined" daughter.
    Did she have any siblings? Any other close family members?
    Your theory ties in pretty closely to what I think. Dorothy had spent a few days in Boston with her boyfriend Griscom, which was a very rebellious thing for a young lady to do in those days. Also, it appears that her father was a rather controlling individual who wanted Dorothy to settle down with a "suitable" young man. Dorothy wanted to be a writer, something her father did not approve of. So given those factors, it doesn't seem that implausible to think of Dorothy deciding to run away, whether due to pregnancy or just a desire to be independent.

    I have always thought that at some point, Dorothy's family found out what happened to her. As you said, a pregnancy would create quite a scandal, and her father did not like attention from the media.

    Griscom is a puzzling character. From what I've read it is hard to figure out if he actually cared about Dorothy, or just cared about Dorothy's family's money. I can't help feeling he was involved somehow, even though he was out of the country when Dorothy disappeared. At times he seemed to distance himself from Dorothy, and then at other times he's spending money in an effort to find her. Very curious.

  12. #27
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    Jul 2004
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    Maybe he didn't want the pregnancy, yet felt responsible? And maybe after the daughter went missing and then Daddy finds out she was pregnant, maybe he was the one who suggested the abortion? And maybe he threatened the man who "ruined" his daughter? Because the purpose of an abortion would be to make the child go away without anyone being suspicious. And an abortion wouldn't do much good if the guy was hanging around, tempting her to do wrong again?
    Just when I think that I have seen the most depraved things a human can do to another human, somebody posts a new story...........

    Why is it that when a custodial parent fails to provide for a child it is called neglect and is a criminal matter. But when a non custodial parent fails to provide it is called failure to support and is a civil matter?


    "Just when the caterpillar thought its world was over, it became a butterfly" ~ Michelle Knight

  13. #28
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    Oct 2005
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    I don't think the family disowned her. From the articles I've read in the New York Times, they acted genuinely bereaved by her disappearance, and they spent more than 100,000 dollars trying to find her. In the obituary for Dorothy's mother, it is said that since her daughter had disappeared she'd suffered from a nervous condition. I don't think they disowned her or banished her, but I don't know either why they decided so soon after her disappearance that she was dead. It is a mystery that intrigues me, and the more I read, the greater the mystery.

    You're right that Griscom is a puzzling character. I've since learned that he hired detectives to try and find Dorothy but then dismissed them after a month, having decided that it was hopeless. He claims to have loved her, but he certainly gave up pretty quickly on finding her.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susan Shock
    I don't think the family disowned her. From the articles I've read in the New York Times, they acted genuinely bereaved by her disappearance, and they spent more than 100,000 dollars trying to find her. In the obituary for Dorothy's mother, it is said that since her daughter had disappeared she'd suffered from a nervous condition. I don't think they disowned her or banished her, but I don't know either why they decided so soon after her disappearance that she was dead. It is a mystery that intrigues me, and the more I read, the greater the mystery.

    You're right that Griscom is a puzzling character. I've since learned that he hired detectives to try and find Dorothy but then dismissed them after a month, having decided that it was hopeless. He claims to have loved her, but he certainly gave up pretty quickly on finding her.
    I think Griscom put up an appearance of wanting to locate Dorothy, but I doubt his heart was in it. I also think that if Dorothy staged her disappearance, she would have told Griscom about it. I don't buy his story that he knew nothing about what happened to Dorothy.

    I've read the articles about Dorothy's family, and agree that her mother took Dorothy's disappearance very hard. However, we don't know what her mother's mental state normally was - perhaps she was always a nervous woman, and Dorothy's disappearance was just too much to handle. I still think Dorothy's father knew what happened to her, probably not long after her disappearance. From the beginning, he told the press that he was fairly certain Dorothy had been abducted and killed, and that her body was probably dumped somewhere in Central Park. I don't think he believed that, but wanted the media to believe it. I also think that if Dorothy was pregnant and later called her father to let him know where she was, her father may never have told any other family members. I think he either disowned her, or paid for an abortion that led to her death.

    Dorothy's father, from what I've read, was a controlling person. He did not take seriously Dorothy's desire to be a writer, and wanted her to marry a "suitable" man. Dorothy was a little old to still be single, and I imagine some pressure was being put on her to settle down.

    I think if I'd met Dorothy, I would have liked her. She seemed to do what she wanted - having Griscom as a boyfriend in spite of her family's disapproval, spending time alone with him in Boston, aspiring to be a writer - all of these things weren't what "proper" young women did, especially ones who were heir to a fortune! She seemed to be an independent woman in an era when society was very much male-dominated.

    There are some who believe Dorothy committed suicide, either because her writing career was not working out, or because Griscom did not want to marry her. That could be possible, especially if she were pregnant. But if she had killed herself, I think her body would have eventually be found.

    My theory, which is only partially supported by the evidence, is this: Dorothy did not want her mother coming with her to shop on the day of her disappearance. I believe that's because Dorothy had an appointment with a doctor, and learned that she was pregnant. She probably wrote a letter to Griscom letting him know this. She went away for a while to decide what to do, how to tell her family, etc. At some point, she contacted her father and explained her situation. He was not an understanding man, and either (1) told her she was no longer a part of the family, (2) sent her money for an abortion, or (3) paid for her to leave the U.S. and live abroad. In any event, he made sure she did not create a scandal by returning home.

    My feeling is that Dorothy was sent to live abroad and have her baby without creating a scandal and besmirching the family name.

  15. #30
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    Interesting theory. I think I would have liked Dorothy myself. I think that's why I want to write this book. She was an appealing person. And being a writer myself I can sympathethize with her.

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