IN the last 24 hours of London woman Laura Kitchens’ life she went to work as normal, went out dancing, argued, joked, and made plans over friends over text and WhatsApp messages.
She didn’t seem to be in any danger, but just over a month ago, on March 7, 2015, the 23-year-old was murdered and police haven’t yet identified the killer — but you just might be able to.
As with most action of the ‘big brother’ age we’re living in, there are easily accessible records of Laura’s movements, relationships and interactions on social media, and all the CCTV footage and other surveillance captured in her final days is freely available online.
It seems creepy, but it’s not unusual. What’s different about this case is that Laura didn’t actually exist.
The Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and dormant MySpace page of the young woman have all been created over the past two years for the BBC’s groundbreaking immersive murder mystery project, The Last Hours of Laura K.
Twenty-four hours of vision has also been staged and can be accessed and reviewed by amateur sleuths wanting to have a go at cracking the case, or just perving on someone’s personal life, in a looping video available online.
The series was inspired by a quote from Edward Snowden, and the reality of a hyper-connected world.
“I don’t want to live in a world where everything that I saw, everything that I do, everyone I talk to, every expression of creativity, love or friendship, is recorded,” the online surveillance whistleblower said.

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