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  1. #1
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    TX - Cheryl Henry and Andy Atkinson murder, Houston, 1990

    I have never posted on a website about this but I thought I might post here. I am including a recent article from the Houston Chronicle about my step-sisters murder in 1990. The article ran on 12/8/04.

    Hoping to reinvigorate their investigation of a 14-year-old homicide case, Houston police have released a handwritten note that may have come from the architect of two of the city's most gruesome slayings.

    The letter, postmarked in Houston, was received in March 2001, more than 10 years after Cheryl Henry and Andy Atkinson were stabbed to death as they parked on a secluded cul-de-sac in west Harris County.

    "It's the kind of case everyone remembers," Houston police Sgt. Billy Belk said. "It sticks in your mind."

    In block letters, the note's sender told investigators, "If you want to know who killed C. Henry and A. Atkinson, it will cost $100,000." The note told investigators to reply in the classifieds section of the March 12, 2001, Houston Chronicle and warned, "a lawyer will be hired to make sure u play straight."

    The note was answered, according to instructions. "We do want to know what you know about Henry /Atkinson," the classified ad read. A number was given for the note-sender or a lawyer to contact investigators "with directions on playing straight."

    Through the years, police had gotten calls whenever an anniversary or other publicity brings the case back to the public's attention.

    The timing of the note, postmarked March 1, 2001, was odd, Belk said, in that it came so long after the slayings, and during a period when the case was getting no publicity. The most recent news story about the case, a 10-year retrospective, had been published Sept. 13, 2000.

    Note suppressed

    The possibilities the note offered were enticing to investigators sitting at yet another dead end in the case, and Belk said the note was never publicized.

    "We kept pretty tight-lipped about it," he said, "to see if we got a response."

    They never did.

    Today, investigators say, it's a pretty sure bet that whoever sent the note does not intend to contact police again. Belk hopes that by releasing the contents of the note someone may recognize the handwriting, the language or some other scrap of information when it is published.

    Cheryl Henry , 22, was home for the summer from classes at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches. Andy Atkinson, whose 22nd birthday was only days away, had just moved home after finishing college in North Carolina.

    The two left on a date the evening of Aug. 21, 1990, along with Henry 's younger sister, Shane, and her escort. The sisters said their goodbyes when the couples left the Bayou Mama club near Westheimer and Gessner late that night.

    Neither Henry nor Atkinson returned from their date; their families reported them missing early the next day. On the evening of Aug. 22, a Houston patrol officer spotted Atkinson's car parked on Enclave Round, a then-undeveloped area off the 1300 block of Enclave Parkway that young people often used as a "lovers lane."

    Blood in the car appeared fresh. When a computer check of the vehicle's license plate showed it belonged to a missing person, a tracking dog was called to search the nearby heavy woods.

    The dog led police to Henry 's body about 200 yards away. Her clothes, found nearby, had been cut from her body, probably with the same knife used to slash her throat. Her hands were bound behind her with hemp rope. Her killer had tried to cover her body with boards from a rotting cedar fence.

    A bunch of deflated balloons hung Dali-like over a tree limb near Henry 's body, having no apparent connection with her death but adding to the surreal quality of the grim scene.

    Darkness halted the search for Atkinson. A Houston police officer was posted to stand watch until dawn, when searchers returned and quickly discovered the second body.

    Atkinson was found about 100 yards from Henry . He was fully clothed, his hands tied behind him with similar rope. He had been seated with his back against a tree trunk before his throat was slashed. He still had his money and watch.

    The young couple had evidently parked to neck, Belk said. The car's front seats were reclined, the engine had been turned off but the key left in the auxiliary position so the music would stay on. Henry 's shoes and bag were in the front floorboard.

    Suspects cleared

    In the first months, investigators chased hundreds of leads. Several potential suspects were identified.

    Cheryl Henry 's killer had raped her, and left behind DNA. One by one, all the suspects were cleared through DNA comparisons.

    Problems within HPD's DNA lab began unfolding in 2002 and ultimately resulted in the lab's closure and the retesting of hundreds of DNA samples, but Belk is confident in the work done on the DNA left by Henry 's killer.

    That DNA was profiled at the DNA lab founded at Baylor College of Medicine by renowned researcher Dr. C. Thomas Caskey, Belk said. The sample was entered into the state's Combined DNA Indexing System, but a link was never made to any other crime.

    The sample from Henry 's killer was later sent by HPD to the Texas Department of Public Safety for comparison with DNA from Angel Maturino Resendiz, a convicted rail-riding serial killer. That didn't provide a match either, Belk said.

    Last month, Belk and members of Henry 's family met with Houston Police Chief Harold Hurtt, who approved the independent retesting of all the DNA samples taken from possible suspects and eliminated through tests done at HPD's lab, Belk said.

    He said the case has never gone completely cold.

    "We've gotten at least one new lead every year," Belk said, "and I follow up on every one of them."

    Noting that most investigators have at least one case they can't let go of, Belk said, "This is mine."

    If the case has haunted Belk, it has tortured Barbara Craig, Henry 's mother.

    "I was always so proud of Cheryl ," Craig said recently. "She was the older sister to five other kids. ... The youngest, the twins, were just starting fifth grade that year. Their first day of school was spent at their sister's funeral."

    Her daughter's death devastated the family, Craig said. The details made it almost too painful to bear.

    "To be killed is horrible," Craig said, "But to be terrorized, tied up, raped ... To think her last moments were of terror, and I wasn't there. Because mothers, you know, that's their job, to make it better."

    Several scenarios

    Craig said finding the person who killed her daughter and Atkinson is important to the family, although "we try not to base our happiness on whether or not the person is caught."

    Atkinson's father could not be reached for comment.

    Belk acknowledges the note could be a hoax, but he said it is difficult to see what reward there could be in such a deception. The other possibilities are that the note is from the killer, or from someone who could identify the killer.

    The latter would probably be the best news for Belk. In a study published in the Journal of Criminal Justice and Popular Culture in 2002, Seattle University journalism professor Tomas Guillen looked at a half-dozen killers who contacted police or the media before their capture, and concluded that while the killers' missives often helped police link previously unlinked crimes, or proved pivotal in helping convict the offenders once they were caught, they rarely helped identify a killer.

    "Although these killers injected themselves into cases, sometimes repeatedly for years, with poems, letters, and telephone calls to investigators or the news media, the communiques did not lead to enough investigative evidence or clues to put an immediate end to a series of slayings," Guillen wrote.

    All Belk wants is some foothold he can use to push the case closer to its resolution.

    Anyone with information in the case can call Belk at 713-308-3600, or Crime Stoppers at 713-222-TIPS.

    ...

    Houston homicide investigators want to know who wrote them an anonymous letter regarding the 1990 slayings of Cheryl Henry and Andy Atkinson. Their bodies were found near a secluded cul-de-sac in west Harris County. Police got the letter three years ago and are releasing it now in hope that someone with information will come forward.

    The letter demanded $100,000 in exchange for the killer’s identity and asked police to respond through the Houston Chronicle’s ``personal column.’’

    The letter writer warned that a lawyer would be hired ``to make sure u play straight.’’
    Last edited by Kimster; 01-05-2013 at 01:00 PM. Reason: featured cold case from 1/5/2013 to 1/13/2013


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  3. #2
    Mocity, please accept my condolences. I can not imagine how hard it must be. My prayers are with you and your family. May justice prevail.

    GOD BLESS YOU!


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  5. #3
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    I have thought about this often. It was tremendously upsetting. I'm sure that there are many other people who were shocked and saddened by your loss as well. We had just moved back from California to Texas in 1989, and it has been on my heart often that it remains unsolved.

    My heart goes out to your family.

    I hope that like the BTK killer, your stepsister's killer will give himself away soon.


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  7. #4
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    This crime sounds like a serial killer and the note asking for money is another nincompoop looking to make a dime off a tragedy.


  8. #5
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    Mocity - the article states that the note has been released to the public, in the hopes that the public can identify the handwriting.

    Do you have a link to that?

    Prayers for you and your family. It seems like if they made this note REALLY public, like front page of the paper, someone would recognize it.


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  10. #6
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    yes, the note was published on the front page of the Houston Chronicle. You WOULD THINK that someone would recognize the handwriting but none of the calls ended up with anything substantial. Thank you for your prayers


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  12. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mocity
    I have never posted on a website about this but I thought I might post here. I am including a recent article from the Houston Chronicle about my step-sisters murder in 1990. The article ran on 12/8/04.
    Please accept my condolences. God Bless you. I hope they find the scum that took your sister from you.


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  14. #8
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    Cool thanks

    Thanks Jeana for your response. I will keep you in my prayers as well. I hope they catch these people. It makes me sick to think people get away with these things and scares me that they are walking around in society.


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  16. #9
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    TX - Suggestions on my sister's cold case

    I had a question and thought I might try this site. My step-sister and her boyfriend were murdered back in 1990. Today, August 23rd 2005, is the 15th anniversary of her death. We had a press conference today with the Houston Police Department and Crimestoppers. The case remains unsolved however there is a good DNA sample and someone sent a handwritten letter to HPD but that person has never come forward. The story is below.

    My question is with regards to national media coverage. We want to try to get this story out to the news media on a national level. There has been alot of coverage locally but none nationally. Do you know where we can start? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    The article that follows is the last written article with regards to the case. It was written within the past year and published in the Houston Chronicle.

    Hoping to reinvigorate their investigation of a 14-year-old homicide case, Houston police have released a handwritten note that may have come from the architect of two of the city's most gruesome slayings.

    The letter, postmarked in Houston, was received in March 2001, more than 10 years after
    Cheryl Henry and Andy Atkinson were stabbed to death as they parked on a secluded cul-de-sac in west Harris County.

    "It's the kind of case everyone remembers," Houston police Sgt. Billy Belk said. "It sticks in your mind."

    In block letters, the note's sender told investigators, "If you want to know who killed C.
    Henry and A. Atkinson , it will cost $100,000." The note told investigators to reply in the classifieds section of the March 12, 2001, Houston Chronicle and warned, "a lawyer will be hired to make sure u play straight."

    The note was answered, according to instructions. "We do want to know what you know about
    Henry /Atkinson ," the classified ad read. A number was given for the note-sender or a lawyer to contact investigators "with directions on playing straight."

    Through the years, police had gotten calls whenever an anniversary or other publicity brings the case back to the public's attention.

    The timing of the note, postmarked March 1, 2001, was odd, Belk said, in that it came so long after the slayings, and during a period when the case was getting no publicity. The most recent news story about the case, a 10-year retrospective, had been published Sept. 13, 2000.

    Note suppressed

    The possibilities the note offered were enticing to investigators sitting at yet another dead end in the case, and Belk said the note was never publicized.

    "We kept pretty tight-lipped about it," he said, "to see if we got a response."

    They never did.

    Today, investigators say, it's a pretty sure bet that whoever sent the note does not intend to contact police again. Belk hopes that by releasing the contents of the note someone may recognize the handwriting, the language or some other scrap of information when it is published.

    Cheryl Henry , 22, was home for the summer from classes at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches. Andy Atkinson , whose 22nd birthday was only days away, had just moved home after finishing college in North Carolina.

    The two left on a date the evening of Aug. 21, 1990, along with
    Henry 's younger sister, Shane, and her escort. The sisters said their goodbyes when the couples left the Bayou Mama club near Westheimer and Gessner late that night.

    Neither
    Henry nor Atkinson returned from their date; their families reported them missing early the next day. On the evening of Aug. 22, a Houston patrol officer spotted Atkinson 's car parked on Enclave Round, a then-undeveloped area off the 1300 block of Enclave Parkway that young people often used as a "lovers lane."

    Blood in the car appeared fresh. When a computer check of the vehicle's license plate showed it belonged to a missing person, a tracking dog was called to search the nearby heavy woods.

    The dog led police to
    Henry 's body about 200 yards away. Her clothes, found nearby, had been cut from her body, probably with the same knife used to slash her throat. Her hands were bound behind her with hemp rope. Her killer had tried to cover her body with boards from a rotting cedar fence.

    A bunch of deflated balloons hung Dali-like over a tree limb near
    Henry 's body, having no apparent connection with her death but adding to the surreal quality of the grim scene.

    Darkness halted the search for
    Atkinson . A Houston police officer was posted to stand watch until dawn, when searchers returned and quickly discovered the second body.

    Atkinson was found about 100 yards from Henry . He was fully clothed, his hands tied behind him with similar rope. He had been seated with his back against a tree trunk before his throat was slashed. He still had his money and watch.

    The young couple had evidently parked to neck, Belk said. The car's front seats were reclined, the engine had been turned off but the key left in the auxiliary position so the music would stay on.
    Henry 's shoes and bag were in the front floorboard.

    Suspects cleared

    In the first months, investigators chased hundreds of leads. Several potential suspects were identified.

    Cheryl Henry 's killer had raped her, and left behind DNA. One by one, all the suspects were cleared through DNA comparisons.

    Problems within HPD's DNA lab began unfolding in 2002 and ultimately resulted in the lab's closure and the retesting of hundreds of DNA samples, but Belk is confident in the work done on the DNA left by
    Henry 's killer.

    That DNA was profiled at the DNA lab founded at Baylor College of Medicine by renowned researcher Dr. C. Thomas Caskey, Belk said. The sample was entered into the state's Combined DNA Indexing System, but a link was never made to any other crime.

    The sample from
    Henry 's killer was later sent by HPD to the Texas Department of Public Safety for comparison with DNA from Angel Maturino Resendiz, a convicted rail-riding serial killer. That didn't provide a match either, Belk said.

    Last month, Belk and members of
    Henry 's family met with Houston Police Chief Harold Hurtt, who approved the independent retesting of all the DNA samples taken from possible suspects and eliminated through tests done at HPD's lab, Belk said.

    He said the case has never gone completely cold.

    "We've gotten at least one new lead every year," Belk said, "and I follow up on every one of them."

    Noting that most investigators have at least one case they can't let go of, Belk said, "This is mine."

    If the case has haunted Belk, it has tortured Barbara Craig,
    Henry 's mother.

    "I was always so proud of
    Cheryl ," Craig said recently. "She was the older sister to five other kids. ... The youngest, the twins, were just starting fifth grade that year. Their first day of school was spent at their sister's funeral."

    Her daughter's death devastated the family, Craig said. The details made it almost too painful to bear.

    "To be killed is horrible," Craig said, "But to be terrorized, tied up, raped ... To think her last moments were of terror, and I wasn't there. Because mothers, you know, that's their job, to make it better."

    Several scenarios

    Craig said finding the person who killed her daughter and
    Atkinson is important to the family, although "we try not to base our happiness on whether or not the person is caught."

    Atkinson 's father could not be reached for comment.

    Belk acknowledges the note could be a hoax, but he said it is difficult to see what reward there could be in such a deception. The other possibilities are that the note is from the killer, or from someone who could identify the killer.

    The latter would probably be the best news for Belk. In a study published in the Journal of Criminal Justice and Popular Culture in 2002, Seattle University journalism professor Tomas Guillen looked at a half-dozen killers who contacted police or the media before their capture, and concluded that while the killers' missives often helped police link previously unlinked crimes, or proved pivotal in helping convict the offenders once they were caught, they rarely helped identify a killer.

    "Although these killers injected themselves into cases, sometimes repeatedly for years, with poems, letters, and telephone calls to investigators or the news media, the communiques did not lead to enough investigative evidence or clues to put an immediate end to a series of slayings," Guillen wrote.

    All Belk wants is some foothold he can use to push the case closer to its resolution.

    Anyone with information in the case can call Belk at 713-308-3600, or Crime Stoppers at 713-222-TIPS.

    ...

    Houston homicide investigators want to know who wrote them an anonymous letter regarding the 1990 slayings of
    Cheryl Henry and Andy Atkinson . Their bodies were found near a secluded cul-de-sac in west Harris County. Police got the letter three years ago and are releasing it now in hope that someone with information will come forward.

    The letter demanded $100,000 in exchange for the killer’s identity and asked police to respond through the Houston Chronicle’s ``personal column.’’

    The letter writer warned that a lawyer would be hired ``to make sure u play straight.’’



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  18. #10
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    Mar 2005
    Location
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    Posts
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    TX - Cheryl Henry and Andy Atkinson murder, Houston, 1990

    I had a question and thought I might try this site. My step-sister and her boyfriend were murdered back in 1990. Today, August 23rd 2005, is the 15th anniversary of her death. We had a press conference today with the Houston Police Department and Crimestoppers. The case remains unsolved however there is a good DNA sample and someone sent a handwritten letter to HPD but that person has never come forward. The story is below.

    My question is with regards to national media coverage. We want to try to get this story out to the news media on a national level. There has been alot of coverage locally but none nationally. Do you know where we can start? Any suggestions would be appreciated.



    The article that follows is the last written article with regards to the case. It was written within the past year and published in the Houston Chronicle.

    Hoping to reinvigorate their investigation of a 14-year-old homicide case, Houston police have released a handwritten note that may have come from the architect of two of the city's most gruesome slayings.

    The letter, postmarked in Houston, was received in March 2001, more than 10 years after
    Cheryl Henry and Andy Atkinson were stabbed to death as they parked on a secluded cul-de-sac in west Harris County.

    "It's the kind of case everyone remembers," Houston police Sgt. Billy Belk said. "It sticks in your mind."

    In block letters, the note's sender told investigators, "If you want to know who killed C.
    Henry and A. Atkinson , it will cost $100,000." The note told investigators to reply in the classifieds section of the March 12, 2001, Houston Chronicle and warned, "a lawyer will be hired to make sure u play straight."

    The note was answered, according to instructions. "We do want to know what you know about
    Henry /Atkinson ," the classified ad read. A number was given for the note-sender or a lawyer to contact investigators "with directions on playing straight."

    Through the years, police had gotten calls whenever an anniversary or other publicity brings the case back to the public's attention.

    The timing of the note, postmarked March 1, 2001, was odd, Belk said, in that it came so long after the slayings, and during a period when the case was getting no publicity. The most recent news story about the case, a 10-year retrospective, had been published Sept. 13, 2000.

    Note suppressed

    The possibilities the note offered were enticing to investigators sitting at yet another dead end in the case, and Belk said the note was never publicized.

    "We kept pretty tight-lipped about it," he said, "to see if we got a response."

    They never did.

    Today, investigators say, it's a pretty sure bet that whoever sent the note does not intend to contact police again. Belk hopes that by releasing the contents of the note someone may recognize the handwriting, the language or some other scrap of information when it is published.

    Cheryl Henry , 22, was home for the summer from classes at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches. Andy Atkinson , whose 22nd birthday was only days away, had just moved home after finishing college in North Carolina.

    The two left on a date the evening of Aug. 21, 1990, along with
    Henry 's younger sister, Shane, and her escort. The sisters said their goodbyes when the couples left the Bayou Mama club near Westheimer and Gessner late that night.

    Neither
    Henry nor Atkinson returned from their date; their families reported them missing early the next day. On the evening of Aug. 22, a Houston patrol officer spotted Atkinson 's car parked on Enclave Round, a then-undeveloped area off the 1300 block of Enclave Parkway that young people often used as a "lovers lane."

    Blood in the car appeared fresh. When a computer check of the vehicle's license plate showed it belonged to a missing person, a tracking dog was called to search the nearby heavy woods.

    The dog led police to
    Henry 's body about 200 yards away. Her clothes, found nearby, had been cut from her body, probably with the same knife used to slash her throat. Her hands were bound behind her with hemp rope. Her killer had tried to cover her body with boards from a rotting cedar fence.

    A bunch of deflated balloons hung Dali-like over a tree limb near
    Henry 's body, having no apparent connection with her death but adding to the surreal quality of the grim scene.

    Darkness halted the search for
    Atkinson . A Houston police officer was posted to stand watch until dawn, when searchers returned and quickly discovered the second body.

    Atkinson was found about 100 yards from Henry . He was fully clothed, his hands tied behind him with similar rope. He had been seated with his back against a tree trunk before his throat was slashed. He still had his money and watch.

    The young couple had evidently parked to neck, Belk said. The car's front seats were reclined, the engine had been turned off but the key left in the auxiliary position so the music would stay on.
    Henry 's shoes and bag were in the front floorboard.

    Suspects cleared

    In the first months, investigators chased hundreds of leads. Several potential suspects were identified.

    Cheryl Henry 's killer had raped her, and left behind DNA. One by one, all the suspects were cleared through DNA comparisons.

    Problems within HPD's DNA lab began unfolding in 2002 and ultimately resulted in the lab's closure and the retesting of hundreds of DNA samples, but Belk is confident in the work done on the DNA left by
    Henry 's killer.

    That DNA was profiled at the DNA lab founded at Baylor College of Medicine by renowned researcher Dr. C. Thomas Caskey, Belk said. The sample was entered into the state's Combined DNA Indexing System, but a link was never made to any other crime.

    The sample from
    Henry 's killer was later sent by HPD to the Texas Department of Public Safety for comparison with DNA from Angel Maturino Resendiz, a convicted rail-riding serial killer. That didn't provide a match either, Belk said.

    Last month, Belk and members of
    Henry 's family met with Houston Police Chief Harold Hurtt, who approved the independent retesting of all the DNA samples taken from possible suspects and eliminated through tests done at HPD's lab, Belk said.

    He said the case has never gone completely cold.

    "We've gotten at least one new lead every year," Belk said, "and I follow up on every one of them."

    Noting that most investigators have at least one case they can't let go of, Belk said, "This is mine."

    If the case has haunted Belk, it has tortured Barbara Craig,
    Henry 's mother.

    "I was always so proud of
    Cheryl ," Craig said recently. "She was the older sister to five other kids. ... The youngest, the twins, were just starting fifth grade that year. Their first day of school was spent at their sister's funeral."

    Her daughter's death devastated the family, Craig said. The details made it almost too painful to bear.

    "To be killed is horrible," Craig said, "But to be terrorized, tied up, raped ... To think her last moments were of terror, and I wasn't there. Because mothers, you know, that's their job, to make it better."

    Several scenarios

    Craig said finding the person who killed her daughter and
    Atkinson is important to the family, although "we try not to base our happiness on whether or not the person is caught."

    Atkinson 's father could not be reached for comment.

    Belk acknowledges the note could be a hoax, but he said it is difficult to see what reward there could be in such a deception. The other possibilities are that the note is from the killer, or from someone who could identify the killer.

    The latter would probably be the best news for Belk. In a study published in the Journal of Criminal Justice and Popular Culture in 2002, Seattle University journalism professor Tomas Guillen looked at a half-dozen killers who contacted police or the media before their capture, and concluded that while the killers' missives often helped police link previously unlinked crimes, or proved pivotal in helping convict the offenders once they were caught, they rarely helped identify a killer.

    "Although these killers injected themselves into cases, sometimes repeatedly for years, with poems, letters, and telephone calls to investigators or the news media, the communiques did not lead to enough investigative evidence or clues to put an immediate end to a series of slayings," Guillen wrote.

    All Belk wants is some foothold he can use to push the case closer to its resolution.

    Anyone with information in the case can call Belk at 713-308-3600, or Crime Stoppers at 713-222-TIPS.

    ...

    Houston homicide investigators want to know who wrote them an anonymous letter regarding the 1990 slayings of
    Cheryl Henry and Andy Atkinson . Their bodies were found near a secluded cul-de-sac in west Harris County. Police got the letter three years ago and are releasing it now in hope that someone with information will come forward.

    The letter demanded $100,000 in exchange for the killer’s identity and asked police to respond through the Houston Chronicle’s ``personal column.’’

    The letter writer warned that a lawyer would be hired ``to make sure u play straight.’’



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  20. #11
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    Mocity

    I've read this story before.

    I wish you and Houston PD the best of luck in locating the killer.


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  22. #12
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    First of all let me say how sorry I am for your loss. To lose someone this close is terrible, but under these circumstances- well I cannot even imagine how much worse it makes it.

    First, I presume that you have sent a message to America's Most Wanted? Unsolved Mysteries?
    And there are many more places you might want to contact. Most of the contacts are listed in a thread here at WS:
    http://websleuths.com/forums/showthread.php?t=26445
    I would suggest that you message them, and that you get as many friends and family as possible to message them. The more requests they get on a particular case- the more attention they will pay.
    Also, have you contacted any of the bloggers? Blogs are hot right now, they are good at publicizing cases, many of them are also good sleuthers, and even the media are watching them now.
    Do you know if your sister's case was ever connected to any other killings?

    I hope you someday get justice. Don't give up, keep working on it. Stay in touch with the LE and let them know you still are interested in getting info on the case.
    Just when I think that I have seen the most depraved things a human can do to another human, somebody posts a new story...........

    Why is it that when a custodial parent fails to provide for a child it is called neglect and is a criminal matter. But when a non custodial parent fails to provide it is called failure to support and is a civil matter?


    "Just when the caterpillar thought its world was over, it became a butterfly" ~ Michelle Knight


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  24. #13
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    Houston, Texas
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    Thanks to you both. LE has been wonderful to my family and we keep in touch with the lead investigator almost monthly since this happened in Aug 1990. Locally there is alot of interest. Now the lead investigator has been promoted and is leading the cold case unit so we are lucky in that regards. Crimestoppers and LE here has asked us to try to get the story out nationally so I am trying to find out information. Thank you for the suggestions!!

    It is more than terrifying to know that this person (most likely persons) is walking around among us. Due to the nature of the killings and the placement they believe it is at least 2 people. The new DNA technology has even now told us it was a white male that raped her.

    Thanks again.


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  26. #14
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    32,557
    mocity:
    I'm so sorry to hear about your sister and her date. It must be hard having to deal with this, and never finding the perp! What a tragedy.

    First, because they have dna, I assume they've filed it with the national dna database? Just because it was a crime in Texas, doesn't mean the perp is from there. Recently, we've seen a rash of crimes such as this where the perp had crimes in multiple states. This guy could be from anywhere.

    Please check the link below and go to JerseyGirl's posts # 110 & 111. She has lots of media outlets listed that you could contact.

    http://websleuths.com/forums/showthr...1&page=5&pp=25

    Have there been any other crimes such as this in that area? The MO doesn't necessarily have to be exact, they could be taped rather than tied, beaten or shot rather than knifed. It could be just one victim, (meaning a woman alone) or it could even be a child. Recently, some of these perps have shown that it's more a chance of 'opportunity' rather than a specific age or gender.

    Good luck. I hope you find your answers.

    JMHO
    fran


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  28. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    523
    Quote Originally Posted by mocity
    I had a question and thought I might try this site. My step-sister and her boyfriend were murdered back in 1990. Today, August 23rd 2005, is the 15th anniversary of her death.
    Mocity-

    I'm so sorry for the loss of your sister and her boyfriend years ago....I just read this story this morning. I'm just so very sorry!

    I did like that LE was asking people to look at the note to see if they could recognize the handwriting but to be honest, I couldn't find a good enough picture to see what the note said or see the handwriting?! I live in Austin anyway but you never know...

    I think you definitely should check into AMW, Nancy Grace or Greta. I've emailed Greta before and gotten a response...she's awesome!!

    Good luck to you! You and your family are in my prayers!

    WHERE IS CAYLEE???


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