905 users online (145 members and 760 guests)  


Websleuths News


Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    The great white north
    Posts
    2,586

    "It Could Of Been Me" Thirteen remarkable women share their stories

    http://site.macleans.ca/longform/alm...ing/index.html

    Over the last several months, 13 Indigenous survivors of horrific violence have chosen to recount their stories to Maclean’s. They come from coastal fishing communities, from remote, fly-in reserves, small-town Canada, and the country’s largest cities. What unites them is a shared pain: “It could have been me,” as Kim Jonathan, interim chief of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations, the country’s highest-ranking female Indigenous leader says. “I could have been among the missing and murdered.” Every one of them agreed to be named and photographed. They are speaking up in an attempt to change the way we perceive the girls and women we continue to lose at an appalling rate; and to shift the discourse on Canada’s missing and murdered, a narrative that too often blames the victim, and fails to consider the historical context that led to here. (Maclean’s chose not to use the names of two victims of spousal abuse from isolated, northern communities with no on-site police: it was feared that doing so could put their children at risk.)

    One woman, in the weeks leading to publication, had to tell her teenaged sons she had been raped so they heard it from her first; another told her father for the first time that she had been sexually assaulted. Some had never shared these stories before—with anyone. In speaking out, these women shatter every stereotype: They are nurses, accountants, politicians, business owners, student leaders. Eleven of 13 have post-secondary education.

    Their voices are critically important, particularly when the federal government remains fiercely opposed to a public inquiry. In the months Maclean’s spent gathering their stories it became clear that multiple factors are putting some Indigenous women at greater risk. Eleven of 13 are direct descendants of residential school survivors. More than two-thirds had mothers who were also victims of rape. Some could point to grandmothers who were also victimized: a cycle of sexual violence that in many cases began at residential school. In Mona Woodward’s family, four generations of women have been raped.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    271
    Quote Originally Posted by Patience View Post
    http://site.macleans.ca/longform/alm...ing/index.html

    Over the last several months, 13 Indigenous survivors of horrific violence have chosen to recount their stories to Maclean’s. They come from coastal fishing communities, from remote, fly-in reserves, small-town Canada, and the country’s largest cities. What unites them is a shared pain: “It could have been me,” as Kim Jonathan, interim chief of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations, the country’s highest-ranking female Indigenous leader says. “I could have been among the missing and murdered.” Every one of them agreed to be named and photographed. They are speaking up in an attempt to change the way we perceive the girls and women we continue to lose at an appalling rate; and to shift the discourse on Canada’s missing and murdered, a narrative that too often blames the victim, and fails to consider the historical context that led to here. (Maclean’s chose not to use the names of two victims of spousal abuse from isolated, northern communities with no on-site police: it was feared that doing so could put their children at risk.)

    One woman, in the weeks leading to publication, had to tell her teenaged sons she had been raped so they heard it from her first; another told her father for the first time that she had been sexually assaulted. Some had never shared these stories before—with anyone. In speaking out, these women shatter every stereotype: They are nurses, accountants, politicians, business owners, student leaders. Eleven of 13 have post-secondary education.

    Their voices are critically important, particularly when the federal government remains fiercely opposed to a public inquiry. In the months Maclean’s spent gathering their stories it became clear that multiple factors are putting some Indigenous women at greater risk. Eleven of 13 are direct descendants of residential school survivors. More than two-thirds had mothers who were also victims of rape. Some could point to grandmothers who were also victimized: a cycle of sexual violence that in many cases began at residential school. In Mona Woodward’s family, four generations of women have been raped.
    Some of these communities have no on-site law enforcement? That's horrible - inexcusable, really.

    It is important for societies all over the world to understand that it's impossible to stereotype a victim(as uneducated or whatever else), especially since it seems that this form of stereotyping(like all other forms) is only done to give people an excuse to "look down on" the victims when it's time to actually take societal responsibility for helping those victims seek justice.

    Some predators do seek victims who are uneducated and/or marginalized by society, because they don't think such women will be "missed" by anyone...but, many others choose victims(such as these women) with degrees/credentials/accomplishments, because they get a rush out of "getting rid of" women with bright potential who "dare" to exist in the professional world alongside men.

    Some predators are also racist b******s, and so are some government officials(despite our supposedly "civilized" world) - that certainly applies here, too(and that's why I bolded the part I bolded), but the violence comes from many sources(including a victim's own biological family) - the root of the problem is that society in general refuses to properly protect ANY women.

    <modsnip>

    Thank you for sharing this.
    Last edited by sillybilly; 09-08-2015 at 02:16 AM. Reason: unnecessary
    "Two eyes are not enough, if one desires to accomplish anything." - Marie Bashkirtseff

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    20,471
    Unless I provide a link, every one of my posts are to be considered rumor, Speculation, or simply MY OWN OPINION.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Southern Ontario
    Posts
    3,671
    Very sad news today imo on this subject - the initial date for a Canadian database for missing, unidentified and murdered people was suppose to be fully operational in 2016. Now the CBC reports, nonchalantly and with no update or explanation, that the date is 2017 - as if it was always that way.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/ca...says-1.3110788

    See WS link -

    http://www.websleuths.com/forums/for...eference-Forum

    2016 was never meant to be 2017 or 2016 - 2017. While the CBC promotes how much they care and want to see action for the MMIW, they have let the public down in a big way by not addressing the delay or giving a date in 2017. Is that January or December 2017? I wrote the CBC many months ago asking for an article on the 2016 implementation. This was the best they could do?

    This whole matter is sunk and will never get the attention or resources required. Jmo. Sad.



Similar Threads

  1. The Different "Zanny the Nanny" Stories in One Thread.
    By TorisMom003 in forum Caylee Anthony 2 years old
    Replies: 80
    Last Post: 03-01-2014, 11:24 AM
  2. Replies: 84
    Last Post: 07-21-2012, 04:55 PM
  3. Replies: 66
    Last Post: 11-06-2011, 02:11 AM
  4. Replies: 122
    Last Post: 07-14-2008, 10:56 AM