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  1. #1
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    Today is 105th anniversary-Galveston 1900

    Today is 105th anniversary of the 1900 unnamed hurricane that destroyed Galveston, Sept. 8, 1900.

    http://www.galvnews.com/story.lasso?...d8aef0607408e0

    From staff reports
    The Daily News

    Published September 8, 2005

    GALVESTON — Today marks the 105th anniversary of the unnamed hurricane that destroyed this island city, killed somewhere between 6,000 and 12,000 people and inspired one of history’s most amazing feats of civil engineering.

    More chronologically significant anniversaries have come and gone — the first, the 50th and the 100th. But none of those had the grim contemporary context of this anniversary, coming as the nation reels from the first great storm of the new century, the storm that could unseat Galveston from its sad place in the history of calamity.


    While we hear of the comparison between Katrina and Camille, Betsey, Andrew and Ivan, practically no one mentions the formerly deadliest storm in US history. This happened before any of us were born, but its toll on human life was immeasureable - at least until now.

  2. #2
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    OMG what a story. Thanks Pepper.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBean
    OMG what a story. Thanks Pepper.
    An excellent book - Isaac's Storm by Erik Larsen tells all about the storm, what lead up to it and its aftermath. The same kind of bungling and arrogance went on then as now. Wonderfully researched and it reads like a novel but it isn't.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pepper
    Today is 105th anniversary of the 1900 unnamed hurricane that destroyed Galveston, Sept. 8, 1900.

    http://www.galvnews.com/story.lasso?...d8aef0607408e0

    From staff reports
    The Daily News

    Published September 8, 2005

    GALVESTON — Today marks the 105th anniversary of the unnamed hurricane that destroyed this island city, killed somewhere between 6,000 and 12,000 people and inspired one of history’s most amazing feats of civil engineering.

    More chronologically significant anniversaries have come and gone — the first, the 50th and the 100th. But none of those had the grim contemporary context of this anniversary, coming as the nation reels from the first great storm of the new century, the storm that could unseat Galveston from its sad place in the history of calamity.


    While we hear of the comparison between Katrina and Camille, Betsey, Andrew and Ivan, practically no one mentions the formerly deadliest storm in US history. This happened before any of us were born, but its toll on human life was immeasureable - at least until now.
    The death toll from the Galveston flood was on the shoulders of the Galveston Chief Weatherman at the time, who didn't think the approaching storm was going to present a problem. PBS had a great documentary on this, which I happened to see, about a year ago. The Chief Weatherman's brother, who worked for him at the time, fought him tooth and nail, as the brother figured the storm was going to cause exactly what it did. It's a great documentary--hope some of you are able to see it sometime.

  5. #5
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    More on this event in history can be found at:

    http://www.1900storm.com/

    There is an interesting article here on the rebuilding of the city, and how they raised it several feet. This was quite an accomplishment for 1900.

    I first became aware of this disaster when researching my genealogy. I found one branch of the family vacationing in Galveston from Hot Springs, Arkansas, all lost in the storm - 5 children and their parents. One son, away at college at the time, was the only survivor of this family.

    I would love to see this PBS documentary, Buzz. Thanks for the information.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pepper
    More on this event in history can be found at:

    http://www.1900storm.com/

    There is an interesting article here on the rebuilding of the city, and how they raised it several feet. This was quite an accomplishment for 1900.

    I first became aware of this disaster when researching my genealogy. I found one branch of the family vacationing in Galveston from Hot Springs, Arkansas, all lost in the storm - 5 children and their parents. One son, away at college at the time, was the only survivor of this family.

    I would love to see this PBS documentary, Buzz. Thanks for the information.
    Pepper, I was wondering if the libraries might have copies of the PBS documentaries; seems to me they should have as so many of them are so well researched, they provide great history lessons

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by tipper
    An excellent book - Isaac's Storm by Erik Larsen tells all about the storm, what lead up to it and its aftermath. The same kind of bungling and arrogance went on then as now. Wonderfully researched and it reads like a novel but it isn't.
    Oh wow! Thanks Tipper.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pepper
    More on this event in history can be found at:

    http://www.1900storm.com/

    There is an interesting article here on the rebuilding of the city, and how they raised it several feet. This was quite an accomplishment for 1900.
    What a story and what a comeback for this city.

  9. #9
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    A chilling comment from that website:
    As Galvestonians and the rest of the country mark the centennial of the deadliest hurricane in U.S. history, its story continues to linger in the minds of virtually everyone who lives along a coast. It is the reminder of what can happen when the winds blow and the tides rise along the hurricane-prone coasts of America.


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzzm1
    Pepper, I was wondering if the libraries might have copies of the PBS documentaries; seems to me they should have as so many of them are so well researched, they provide great history lessons
    Buzz, they must have as I saw it on T.V. about a week ago and mentioned it on another thread. Galveston was considered the Riveria of the U.S., the hotels and homes were absolutely beautiful.




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