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Thread: The Levees - A little history

  1. #1
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    The Levees - A little history

    http://www.pubs.asce.org/ceonline/ce.../0603feat.html

    The location of New Orleans was ideal for portage because traders could access the Mississippi from the gulf via Lake Pontchartrain, avoiding the treacherous lower 100 mi (160 km) of the river. In the late 1800s Corps engineers began constructing levees of a more permanent type along the riverís channel and cleared sunken ships, dead trees, and other detritus from its outlet to the gulf. With the levees in place, the lowlands beyond the river did not flood as often, and people began building homes in areas once reserved for alligators, mosquitoes, and yellow fever.

    In the spring of 1927, the Mississippi River flooded in a way that had never been recorded before. Raging waters tore through levees in Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana, killing at least 1,000 people and inundating 1 million homes. It was the mighty riverís last hurrah. Soon thereafter, Congress directed Corps engineers to straighten the river in places, add floodgates in others, and increase the height of its levees all the way from Vicksburg, Mississippi, to the gulf. At the same time, New Orleans began developing what has become the most sophisticated drainage network in the United States. Today almost 200 mi (320 km) of canals lead to 22 pumping stations located in the low points of the city. The stations are able to pump 35 billion gal (132.5 million m3) of water per day from the city into the surrounding lakes. They could fill the Superdome stadium, the home of the New Orleans Saints football team, to capacity in 35 minutes.

    The city is now well protected from floodwaters from the Mississippi. Storm surge from hurricanes, however, is another matter.

    The article at the link above about is a very important one that will help us all to understand what happened in New Orleans. It was written in June 2003 in Civil Engineering Magazine. In essence Hurricane Katrina was the catalyst for a disaster waiting to happen. No one in the local, state or federal government in positions of authority has the right to claim ignorance. The following are links to sites that give some of the 'political' history:

    DAILY BRIEFING September 1, 2005




    Ex-Army Corps officials say budget cuts imperiled flood mitigation efforts

    By Jason Vest and Justin Rood
    jvest@govexec.com


    As levees burst and floods continued to spread across areas hit by Hurricane Katrina yesterday, a former chief of the Army Corps of Engineers disparaged senior White House officials for "not understanding" that key elements of the region's infrastructure needed repair and rebuilding.

    Mike Parker, the former head of the Army Corps of Engineers, was forced to resign in 2002 over budget disagreements with the White House. He clashed with Mitch Daniels, former director of the Office of Management and Budget, which sets the administration's annual budget goals.
    www.govexec.com/dailyfed/0905/090105jv1.htm

    Published: August 31, 2005 9:00 PM ET

    PHILADELPHIAEven though Hurricane Katrina has moved well north of the city, the waters may still keep rising in New Orleans. That's because Lake Pontchartrain continues to pour through a two-block-long break in the main levee, near the city's 17th Street Canal. With much of the Crescent City some 10 feet below sea level, the rising tide may not stop until it's level with the massive lake.

    New Orleans had long known it was highly vulnerable to flooding and a direct hit from a hurricane. In fact, the federal government has been working with state and local officials in the region since the late 1960s on major hurricane and flood relief efforts. When flooding from a massive rainstorm in May 1995 killed six people, Congress authorized the Southeast Louisiana Urban Flood Control Project, or SELA.

    ....
    The Newhouse News Service article published Tuesday night observed, "The Louisiana congressional delegation urged Congress earlier this year to dedicate a stream of federal money to Louisiana's coast, only to be opposed by the White House. ... In its budget, the Bush administration proposed a significant reduction in funding for southeast Louisiana's chief hurricane protection project. Bush proposed $10.4 million, a sixth of what local officials say they need."

    Local officials are now saying, the article reported, that had Washington heeded their warnings about the dire need for hurricane protection, including building up levees and repairing barrier islands, "the damage might not have been nearly as bad as it turned out to be."


    http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1001051313

    This is at least one man's opinion:

    http://www.opednews.com/articles/ope...ican_philo.htm

    I don't know who was in charge of the particular levees that broke...from what I've read it could have been one of many agencies...federal, state or local. I do know that in my community, we cannot put sand on our local beach without the Army Corps of Engineer's approval.
    It seems from the 2003 report that everybody knew or should have known that these levees would break...why did it take so long to shore them up?



    Our awareness of some "simple" basic techniques (repetition, association, composition, omission, diversion, confusion) helps us to understand rhetoric better.

  2. #2
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    The integrity of the levees was a well documented fact, to be sure.
    This is a complex question and I think we'll find issues right on down the line across the board at every level. But one of the things I would want to know right off, is what did the levee commission spend the funds they DID have on? .

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    I heard from someone that the portions of the levees that broke were the newer, upgraded portions. Does anyone know if this is true?
    Making no mistakes is what establishes the certainty of victory, for it means conquering an enemy that is already defeated. -Sun Tzu

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBean
    The integrity of the levees was a well documented fact, to be sure.
    This is a complex question and I think we'll find issues right on down the line across the board at every level. But one of the things I would want to know right off, is what did the levee commission spend the funds they DID have on? .
    It being LA, that could e anyone's guess. The state's long history of graft and corruption is finally catching up with it. Again.

  5. #5
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    less0305 is offline The face is familiar, but I can't quite remember my name!
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyGoatGruff
    It being LA, that could e anyone's guess. The state's long history of graft and corruption is finally catching up with it. Again.
    BGG - did you see this on NBC news?

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9342186/


    Levee Board wasteful spending.
    It's my own two cents. You don't have to read or like it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by less0305
    BGG - did you see this on NBC news?

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9342186/


    Levee Board wasteful spending.
    Thanks for this article less. I think we will be seeing more of this issue and more ugly details.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by less0305
    BGG - did you see this on NBC news?

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9342186/


    Levee Board wasteful spending.
    As yes. The Levee Board. Talk about a plush political patronage job.

  8. #8
    less0305's Avatar
    less0305 is offline The face is familiar, but I can't quite remember my name!
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    There's just corrupt people everywhere. This from my state:

    http://www.newsobserver.com/news/ncw...-9235707c.html

    Former Wake school workers charged in $3.8 million fraud

    The Associated Press

    RALEIGH, N.C. -- An alleged scheme that fraudulently billed Wake County taxpayers $3.8 million for vehicle parts - then diverted the cash for vacation homes and big screen televisions - led to indictments against two former school transportation officials and three others.
    The indictments issued Tuesday said that in a two-year period ending June 2004, thousands of fake orders went back and forth between the school system and the parts supplier, Barnes Motor & Parts Co. of Wilson. The money went to the parts business, and toward the suspects' purchases of campers, personal watercraft, golf carts, automobiles, widescreen televisions and other items, court records said.
    It's my own two cents. You don't have to read or like it.

  9. #9
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    I've lived in Southeast Louisiana most of my life, with a 4 1/2 year stint in Houston. We (the people of this area) have known danger was coming in the form of a large storm for many many years.

    We've seen the land loss happening before our eyes. Just in my lifetime I've lost fishing spots to open water. I've witnessed the barrier islands lose land, becoming smaller as time passes. I've spoken with people from previous generations who say the same, they have seen far too much land disappear and open water take its place.

    The barrier islands are part of a complex natural protection system involving not only the islands but also the extended river delta, or marshes which surround the delta. When a hurricane hits, the barrier islands prove to be a rather good "surge protection" system. The marshes prevent the tidal surge from going very far into more populated areas. If I remember correctly the ratio is per every 10 miles of marsh, the surge's height is lowered by 1' (foot). (If I am incorrect, please advise)

    Creating the levee system removeed the sediments deposited each spring by the Mississippi, as is well known. What is lesser known is that the land (marshes) surrounding the river delta are disappearing, or being taken back by the Gulf of Mexico. They have been eroding since the levee protection system was built.

    All who live in these areas know, have known, what the risks are. The levee system was a blessing to those who created it, yet a bringer of disaster to those who followed. How could we know what would happen? Did the engineers of the day consider the loss of land? Who knows. Progress...right? In my opinion, nothing can be done to stop Mother Nature. If she wants to take South Louisiana back, she will. And it appears as though she is.

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