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  1. #1
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    Canada - Amber Tuccaro, 20, Nisku, AB, 18 Aug 2010

    http://www.cbc.ca/missingandmurdered...alyssa-tuccaro

    " Amber, who was from Alberta’s Mikisew Cree First Nation, was last seen on Aug. 18, 2010, in Nisku, Alta. just outside of Edmonton.

    She arrived with a female friend and Jacob, who was 14 months old at the time, from Fort McMurray, where she was living with her mother. Their plan was to stay the night outside the city to save money, and head into Edmonton the next day.

    Amber was too excited and decided to hitchhike into the city that night. When she didn’t return by the next day, the friend called her mother, who then called the RCMP.

    On Aug. 28, 2012, RCMP released a cell phone conversation Amber had while in the company of an unidentified man. They hoped it would bring in tips to help identify him.

    Sergeant Josee Valiquette says there continues to be tips coming forward but won’t elaborate on what they are or if they’ve identified the man behind the voice.

    On Sept. 1, 2012, just four days after the audio was released, Amber’s remains were found on a rural property near Leduc County by horseback riders."

  2. #2
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    rbbm.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/am...oice-1.3102635

    "Amber Tuccaro's unsolved murder: Do you recognize this voice?
    Man in recording may have answers to unsolved murder near Edmonton five years ago"

    Jun 08, 2015 11:00 AM

    "Unravelling the mysterious disappearance and unsolved murder of Amber Tuccaro could hinge on identifying a man whose voice was captured in a recording of her last phone conversation, new details of which her family has revealed to CBC News.

    Police released 61 seconds of audio, but CBC News has learned that the full audio recording is 17 minutes in length, which corresponds almost directly to the amount of time it would take to drive from the motel where Tuccaro was staying to the site where her body was found two years later.

    The 20-year-old mother from the Mikisew Cree First Nation in Alberta vanished almost five years ago, after getting into an unknown man's vehicle in Nisku, near Edmonton. She was staying in the area for a few days after arriving from Fort McMurray with her infant son and a female friend."

  3. #3
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    "I know that voice. I've ridden with that voice before on several occasions. There's no doubt in my mind that it's his voice," said the woman, whose identity CBC has agreed not to reveal.

    She says she reported his name to the RCMP three years ago.

    CBC News interviewed two other women who say they've reported the same man to police, suspecting it's his voice on the recording.

    One of the women says she called the RCMP about her suspicions as recently as three months ago.

    An RCMP investigator reached out to CBC News to say the Mounties have looked into the man, but have ruled him out as a person of interest in the Tuccaro investigation.

    "They didn't look very hard I don't think," says one of the women, still convinced she knows the identity of the man on the recording.

    "I knew the voice like I know the back of my own hand."

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/am...oice-1.3102635

    Amber's last phone call.


  4. #4
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    Chilling. Poor Amber. I've listened to this before; I don't want to listen to it again.
    She is one of too many in that area. Thank you for posting this dotr.
    Poor Amber.

  5. #5
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    how awful... did it just disconnect?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by cvaldez1975 View Post
    how awful... did it just disconnect?
    No, the engagement of the struggle can be heard with the word gravel and the phone went dead.

    Amber's is a textbook stare at you blank in the face case. And what that means is that had she noticed that moment when "the voice" stared at her with a blank look on his face she would have hit the panic button while still on the secondary highway. However, those child proof door locks would have been another obstacle to overcome as they would be a prerequisite to any vehicle he drives, along with the window locks. And then there's the skinning knife that he would have kept unsheathed and hidden just under the seat, the best knife of choice to be used while driving for the slashing advantage that it offers. These are all factors that a seasoned SK such as "the voice" would make sure were in place at all times when he is on the road in anticipation of an opportunity.

    The issue of the phone would have been reconciled but most likely not until after the recording was released and that delay of 2 years for whatever reason (and I've tried and can't think of one that would be reconcilable from a victim's standpoint), would have put off the implementation of a new rule concerning all cell phones, "all cell phones confiscated upon the entry of the vehicle." Now, this is an easy task to accomplish and I'll give an example from his viewpoint. "Can I see what time it is?" Not, could you tell me what time it is but rather can I see? This invites the victim to show the phone in a proximity that allows him to grab it while at the same time punching his victim in the face, then effectively smashing the phone. All outside lines of communication are cut off, her nose is broken and all child locks are in place.

    Now, the moral to this story is that he is still out there, he is still on the move daily and he is more deadly than ever because he has learned a new trick. There will be no more cell phone mess ups on his behalf and regardless of the way in which the RCMP has consistently maintained a botched investigation into Amber's case from the get go, it is up to the public to find this monster. Amber gave us a gift, one that we cannot afford to turn our heads from regardless of how chilling it is because I'll guarantee that what she and many others have gone through is the equivalent to the worst Freddy movie ever made and this is based on the established comfort zone equations as they relate to Amber's case. The bottom line is that Amber's story and recording are not receiving the public exposure that is needed for more people to come forward in recognition of the monster that "the voice" belongs to, as well the exposure does not expand itself to the vastness of the territory that is required for proper recognition.

  7. #7
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    are we sure she was stabbed? it seems that would be messy in his vehicle.... and it was dumb of him to let her talk on the phone that long in any case, even before the recording was released to the media.

    sad and scary.

    Quote Originally Posted by Clouddippingdown View Post
    No, the engagement of the struggle can be heard with the word gravel and the phone went dead.

    Amber's is a textbook stare at you blank in the face case. And what that means is that had she noticed that moment when "the voice" stared at her with a blank look on his face she would have hit the panic button while still on the secondary highway. However, those child proof door locks would have been another obstacle to overcome as they would be a prerequisite to any vehicle he drives, along with the window locks. And then there's the skinning knife that he would have kept unsheathed and hidden just under the seat, the best knife of choice to be used while driving for the slashing advantage that it offers. These are all factors that a seasoned SK such as "the voice" would make sure were in place at all times when he is on the road in anticipation of an opportunity.

    The issue of the phone would have been reconciled but most likely not until after the recording was released and that delay of 2 years for whatever reason (and I've tried and can't think of one that would be reconcilable from a victim's standpoint), would have put off the implementation of a new rule concerning all cell phones, "all cell phones confiscated upon the entry of the vehicle." Now, this is an easy task to accomplish and I'll give an example from his viewpoint. "Can I see what time it is?" Not, could you tell me what time it is but rather can I see? This invites the victim to show the phone in a proximity that allows him to grab it while at the same time punching his victim in the face, then effectively smashing the phone. All outside lines of communication are cut off, her nose is broken and all child locks are in place.

    Now, the moral to this story is that he is still out there, he is still on the move daily and he is more deadly than ever because he has learned a new trick. There will be no more cell phone mess ups on his behalf and regardless of the way in which the RCMP has consistently maintained a botched investigation into Amber's case from the get go, it is up to the public to find this monster. Amber gave us a gift, one that we cannot afford to turn our heads from regardless of how chilling it is because I'll guarantee that what she and many others have gone through is the equivalent to the worst Freddy movie ever made and this is based on the established comfort zone equations as they relate to Amber's case. The bottom line is that Amber's story and recording are not receiving the public exposure that is needed for more people to come forward in recognition of the monster that "the voice" belongs to, as well the exposure does not expand itself to the vastness of the territory that is required for proper recognition.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by cvaldez1975 View Post
    are we sure she was stabbed? it seems that would be messy in his vehicle.... and it was dumb of him to let her talk on the phone that long in any case, even before the recording was released to the media.

    sad and scary.
    Her killers inhibitions, p/u location, time of day, etc. etc... dictate an extremely high comfort zone whereby risks are concerned. The most critical part of the conversation is the very end in which his intentions and method was revealed. Hitting the gravel road which engaged the struggle and the call being ended. Two things are determined from this and the first is that her murder was premeditated as to the engagement of a close quarter conflict and that in itself dictates a knife being present because a gun in close combat presents too many opportunities for a back fire and one must remember the last thing he would want would be an immediate death. SK's do not abduct for a quick death that a gun would provide, a serious injury would be much more favorable, that which a knife would provide. The other determination is that he had to let her talk on the phone because he could not afford an altercation while on the highway at that time of day in broad daylight that would potentially put him in the ditch for the next passing vehicle to stop and rescue her.

    I doubt this clown is worried about a mess in his vehicle, he would probably just throw a jacket over it and clean it up later. Don't imagine he has cloth seats.

  9. #9
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    Just a reminder that we do NOT KNOW:

    - that the end of the recording we heard is in fact the actual end of the entire 17 minute recording or the point at which Amber was killed

    - if Amber was killed in the car or elsewhere prior to being dumped

    - if a weapon was used or her COD

    While posters may speculate and theorize on these matters, please remember to make it clear (i.e. MOO, JMO, IMO etc) that it is opinion only and not based on known facts presented by LE and/or through MSM.


  10. #10
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    Interesting lengthy article from March 2015, Amber is referenced..

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/...ticle23461886/

    "Living in fear of being written off as another ‘high-risk’ aboriginal woman"

    "It’s not because Fort Mac is particularly unsafe, even in Ms. Herman’s downtown neighbourhood next to the infamous Syncrude Towers. Running through Snye Park is no more dangerous than going for a jog through one of Toronto’s leafy ravines. What troubles Ms. Herman, 28, is that, if she were actually to go missing or be murdered, she would be written off by the RCMP and by society as just another “high-risk” aboriginal woman.

    “I’m scared that if something happens to me, they’re going to be, ‘Oh, why was she jogging on that trail at 6 o’clock in the morning? High-risk behaviour!’ It’s so real,” she says. “I think that’s why I try to present myself the way that I do, because if I do [go missing] I don’t want to be the ‘high risk.’ I don’t want that in my profile at all.”

    The possibility of going missing or being found dead is an ugly fact of life for aboriginal women. It happens at an alarming rate – an RCMP report in 2014 said that 1,017 aboriginal women were murdered and 164 went missing between 1980 and 2012."

    snip>

    " Ms. Herman was friends with Amber Tuccaro, a 20-year-old woman from Fort Chipewyan who disappeared outside Edmonton in 2010 after travelling there from Fort McMurray – where she was living – with her son and a friend.

    Ms. Herman was a news reporter at a local radio station at the time and remembers thinking something was off about Ms. Tuccaro’s disappearance. She says she wanted to continue airing stories about Amber afterwards, but her news director felt it was old news.

    “After Amber went missing, I started going through all the databases and I had a folder of 11 missing or murdered women from Fort McMurray since the ’90s,” Ms. Herman recalls. “I had this little folder and they would make fun of me for [it].”


    Ms. Tuccaro disappeared in August, 2010, and then in October so did Janice Desjarlais, a local homeless woman".

    rbbm.


  11. #11
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    Wondering what Ms. Herman thought was particularly " off ' about Amber's murder?

    Globe and Mail
    "Ms. Herman was a news reporter at a local radio station at the time and remembers thinking something was off about Ms. Tuccaro’s disappearance"

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by dotr View Post
    Wondering what Ms. Herman thought was particularly " off ' about Amber's murder?

    Globe and Mail
    "Ms. Herman was a news reporter at a local radio station at the time and remembers thinking something was off about Ms. Tuccaro’s disappearance"
    Could Ft. McMurray be one of the gathering points? Let's say the a SK/SK's need on average 1 - 2 victims per month, then wouldn't he/they need to cycle through a larger territory and especially in areas of high density population and this would be necessary for 2 factors. The first being overhunting in a particular area would draw too much public awareness and make the hunt more difficult with suspicion around every corner and the second being that there would need to be a cooling off period as to recognition factors in any one particular area. I'm wondering also if there's a placement strategy in place by way of a caser to a certain area over a period of time equated to the number of victims that can adequately be acquired from that area without drawing too much attention. I don't think the focus should be only on the Edmonton area.

  13. #13
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    What a sad story, Just listened to the minute recording. I think I believe the 3 women saying they know who the guy is, judging by how poorly the police handled this i have no doubt they didnt seriously look into him.
    I originally came to see what happened to her son as the first article I read didnt mention she was with a friend, so Im guessing she left the son with her? And also it says she was too excited to go to the city so hitchhiked? What was she so excited about that couldnt wait til the day to go with her friend and son? Am i missing something?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindamichelle1 View Post
    What a sad story, Just listened to the minute recording. I think I believe the 3 women saying they know who the guy is, judging by how poorly the police handled this i have no doubt they didnt seriously look into him.
    I originally came to see what happened to her son as the first article I read didnt mention she was with a friend, so Im guessing she left the son with her? And also it says she was too excited to go to the city so hitchhiked? What was she so excited about that couldnt wait til the day to go with her friend and son? Am i missing something?
    Iirc, Amber had a doctor's appointment in the city, a friend accompanied her to a motel there.
    The doctor's office was still some distance away, so Amber apparently hitchhiked either there or back and was never seen alive again.
    Her baby is okay, so sad he will grow up without his mom.
    imo.

  15. #15
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    Doctor's appointment? Unable to find that anywhere or what time Amber left the motel to hitchhike into the City of Edmonton.

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