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  1. #1
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    Katrina Entitlements

    Very shortly after 9/11, Congress voted to award the surviving family of the victims, an average of $2 million each. This was somewhat of a precedent, but the problem quickly became: "Where do you draw the line?" After the 9/11 award, the families of the Oklahoma City victims quickly stepped forward to ask why, they too, hadn't been compensated for their loss. Their complaint was indeed, justified. Now, with Katrina, it appears that each family? victim? household? will receive some designated amount of money. Again, the problem is: "Where should the line be drawn?" Families suffer catastrophes every day, and the government is not expected, nor do they, take responsibility for the families loss. When 9/11 occurred, I, along with so many, many, others, stepped up to the plate, and donated a sizeable amount of money (and not without personal sacrifice). Shortly thereafter when I found out, that the government was going to award the surviving families, a very large amount of money, I was a little upset that they were belittling the generosity, and responsibility, shown, by so many Americans, myself included. I did the same generous giving for the Tsunami, and am in the process of doing the same for the victims of Katrina, but when the government gets involved in sizeable outright grants, it becomes a giant turnoff for me. Of course their reputation for waste, inefficiency, and allowing so much abuse of the system, during disasters, has something to do with it.

  2. #2
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    What will happen to their credit card debt? Who will incur this?

    I understand our car/home insurance rates will go up to compensate, and I myself was a receipient of insurance repairs after that Blizzard of '99 in the midwest. So I understand the raise in rates.

    But how will the banks/credit card companies recoop their losses?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pook
    What will happen to their credit card debt? Who will incur this?

    I understand our car/home insurance rates will go up to compensate, and I myself was a receipient of insurance repairs after that Blizzard of '99 in the midwest. So I understand the raise in rates.

    But how will the banks/credit card companies recoop their losses?
    All losses, federal, state, or corporate, are passed onto John & Jane Consumer Citizen, and the losses are recouped through either, the prices, or taxes, we pay. We bear the burden.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzzm1
    Very shortly after 9/11, Congress voted to award the surviving family of the victims, an average of $2 million each. This was somewhat of a precedent, but the problem quickly became: "Where do you draw the line?" After the 9/11 award, the families of the Oklahoma City victims quickly stepped forward to ask why, they too, hadn't been compensated for their loss. Their complaint was indeed, justified. Now, with Katrina, it appears that each family? victim? household? will receive some designated amount of money. Again, the problem is: "Where should the line be drawn?" Families suffer catastrophes every day, and the government is not expected, nor do they, take responsibility for the families loss. When 9/11 occurred, I, along with so many, many, others, stepped up to the plate, and donated a sizeable amount of money (and not without personal sacrifice). Shortly thereafter when I found out, that the government was going to award the surviving families, a very large amount of money, I was a little upset that they were belittling the generosity, and responsibility, shown, by so many Americans, myself included. I did the same generous giving for the Tsunami, and am in the process of doing the same for the victims of Katrina, but when the government gets involved in sizeable outright grants, it becomes a giant turnoff for me. Of course their reputation for waste, inefficiency, and allowing so much abuse of the system, during disasters, has something to do with it.
    Oh Buzz, you bring up a sore subject with me, and I guess I am in total agreement with you. Like you, I too gave at considerable personal sacrifice. But it didn't take me long to become disgusted when I learned that for every death the survivors would get something like $2 million. And some, refusing to take this settlement, WERE SUING for larger amounts! The greed that this program fostered made me ill.

    I am truly sorry for all the people that died in this tragedy. But the fact remains that people die tragically every day through no fault of their own, and their families don't usually become millionaires in the process. I fear the same fate may come out of the Katrina crisis.

    I am all for replacing all that these families lost. I am also in favor of providing these displaced people with jobs or training to secure jobs - anything that would enable them to become self-sufficient. However, I am wholeheartedly against making them instant millionaires, or in any monetary way elevating their economic status beyond what they lost - especially if it comes at the cost of taxpayers or consumers in the way of price hikes.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzzm1
    Congress voted to award the surviving family of the victims, an average of $2 million each.
    Maybe we should garnish the wages of those in congress who voted for this. The U.S. government should NOT be responsible for paying victims of terrorist attacks, natural disasters, etc.!! Of course they've always been generous with *our* money.

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    I agree with all of you. I do not want anyone to suffer a loss. But a loss is a loss to everyone. I know a family that the father was killed in auto accident at early age. The mother had to go to work to try and take care of their four children. No one came and gave them $2 millions. I am sure you all know someone like that. I did not think the gov. should have given everyone that money but they wanted to help the airlines. I think we all should help get the people back onto their feet but should not make them rich in the process. I am not rich.- We pay so much in taxes, the government is out of controll. They are all very rich thanks to us. They do not think anything about spending $10, billion dollars. I wish there was something we all could do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LadyLuck
    I agree with all of you. I do not want anyone to suffer a loss. But a loss is a loss to everyone. I know a family that the father was killed in auto accident at early age. The mother had to go to work to try and take care of their four children. No one came and gave them $2 millions. I am sure you all know someone like that. I did not think the gov. should have given everyone that money but they wanted to help the airlines. I think we all should help get the people back onto their feet but should not make them rich in the process. I am not rich.- We pay so much in taxes, the government is out of controll. They are all very rich thanks to us. They do not think anything about spending $10, billion dollars. I wish there was something we all could do.
    You're right LadyLuck, Congress voted for the $2 million windfall for 9/11 surviving families to keep the airlines from being sued. Everyday there are stories just like the one you cited, and the government isn't coming to their rescue. The aftermath of Katrina is turning into a greater debacle everyday; now they are deciding to allow the people who refused to leave, to stay. They are also allowing the business owners to come back in, to start cleaning up their businesses. What a fiasco. Leave it up to the government to create a situation like this. Bush is trying to do everything he can to salvage his image, and what we will most assuredly end up with is a quagmire laced with gratuities, and red tape; whatever can be done to make it more expensive for all of the rest of us.

  8. #8
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    less0305 is offline The face is familiar, but I can't quite remember my name!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzzm1
    You're right LadyLuck, Congress voted for the $2 million windfall for 9/11 surviving families to keep the airlines from being sued. Everyday there are stories just like the one you cited, and the government isn't coming to their rescue. The aftermath of Katrina is turning into a greater debacle everyday; now they are deciding to allow the people who refused to leave, to stay. They are also allowing the business owners to come back in, to start cleaning up their businesses. What a fiasco. Leave it up to the government to create a situation like this. Bush is trying to do everything he can to salvage his image, and what we will most assuredly end up with is a quagmire laced with gratuities, and red tape; whatever can be done to make it more expensive for all of the rest of us.
    Believe it or not, the President has nothing to do with allowing people back into their homes or businesses. But what I certainly DON'T want to hear later are people who wouldn't leave and people going back in prematurely - is lawsuits over some type of illnesses over toxicity and crap. The first time I hear of a lawsuit by one of these folks, I believe I will absolutely explode!!!
    It's my own two cents. You don't have to read or like it.

  9. #9
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    I think handing any of the families a chunk of cash is a very bad idea indeed. The government should offer low interest loans, job training and the like.

  10. #10
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    Heck why not? Just print more money.....

    BTW I'm thinking of switching to Euros.
    I'd rather be hated for who I am than loved for pretending to be someone I'm not.


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzzm1
    Very shortly after 9/11, Congress voted to award the surviving family of the victims, an average of $2 million each. This was somewhat of a precedent, but the problem quickly became: "Where do you draw the line?" After the 9/11 award, the families of the Oklahoma City victims quickly stepped forward to ask why, they too, hadn't been compensated for their loss. Their complaint was indeed, justified. Now, with Katrina, it appears that each family? victim? household? will receive some designated amount of money. Again, the problem is: "Where should the line be drawn?" Families suffer catastrophes every day, and the government is not expected, nor do they, take responsibility for the families loss. When 9/11 occurred, I, along with so many, many, others, stepped up to the plate, and donated a sizeable amount of money (and not without personal sacrifice). Shortly thereafter when I found out, that the government was going to award the surviving families, a very large amount of money, I was a little upset that they were belittling the generosity, and responsibility, shown, by so many Americans, myself included. I did the same generous giving for the Tsunami, and am in the process of doing the same for the victims of Katrina, but when the government gets involved in sizeable outright grants, it becomes a giant turnoff for me. Of course their reputation for waste, inefficiency, and allowing so much abuse of the system, during disasters, has something to do with it.
    Boy I sure am glad to see someone else bring this up. I was afraid I was not very compassionate thinking of this in these terms. Thanks Buzz.

  12. #12
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    less0305 is offline The face is familiar, but I can't quite remember my name!
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBean
    Boy I sure am glad to see someone else bring this up. I was afraid I was not very compassionate thinking of this in these terms. Thanks Buzz.
    In the Polictical Forum there was some slight criticism of some members of Congress who voted no on the additional $50billion package. One of those members was my representative from NC. I called her office to find out about the no vote. She explained it to me that some members of Congress wanted more oversight on the money. Not that she wouldn't approve more money, but not at that big of a leap. She said she would have voted for another $10 mil this week and $10 mil next week and so on - but she wanted FEMA to come back each week and update what was going on and have more oversight on the money rather than just write a $50 bil blank check. Made complete sense to me. I was very satisfied with her answer on the no vote. I'm sure there will be so many criticisms on how the money is spent that maybe better oversight would have been a better idea.
    It's my own two cents. You don't have to read or like it.

  13. #13
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    Will $2,000 FEMA debit cards be misused?

    FEMA/Red Cross debit cards being used at luxery stores in Atlanta's Buckhead neighborhood says New York Daily News.

    "We've seen three of the cards," said a senior employee of the Louis Vuitton store at the Lenox Square Mall in affluent Buckhead, who asked not to be named. "Two I'm certain have purchased; one actually asked if she could use it in the store. This has been since Saturday."

    The distinctive white cards were distributed by the Red Cross and the Federal Emergency Management Agency and carry a value of up to $2,000.

    "There's nothing legally that prevents us from taking it, unfortunately. Other than morally, it's wrong."

    The source told me that the two women who had made purchases with the card each bought a signature monogrammed Louis Vuitton handbag in the $800 range.

    more at the link http://www.cofcc.org/

    This really bothers me.
    Retired 08/03/03

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by less0305
    In the Polictical Forum there was some slight criticism of some members of Congress who voted no on the additional $50billion package. One of those members was my representative from NC. I called her office to find out about the no vote. She explained it to me that some members of Congress wanted more oversight on the money. Not that she wouldn't approve more money, but not at that big of a leap. She said she would have voted for another $10 mil this week and $10 mil next week and so on - but she wanted FEMA to come back each week and update what was going on and have more oversight on the money rather than just write a $50 bil blank check. Made complete sense to me. I was very satisfied with her answer on the no vote. I'm sure there will be so many criticisms on how the money is spent that maybe better oversight would have been a better idea.
    Oh wow great info. Just goes to hhow you there's more to the vote than yes or no. I think they should watch the money very closely.I'm quite concerned about how it is distributed.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow205


    The source told me that the two women who had made purchases with the card each bought a signature monogrammed Louis Vuitton handbag in the $800 range.

    more at the link http://www.cofcc.org/

    This really bothers me.
    Do you have a legitimate news site reporting this?

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