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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    4,778

    Rebuilding and toxic mold

    I heard some woman interested in preserving the architecture and the "black culture" of the neighborhoods affected by the floods. She seemed to think that many of these homes could be rebuilt on the same site, without bulldozing the entire structure down. I am concerned that with the wood framed homes sitting in that toxic stew for weeks, isn't there a concern that toxic mold could develop unless the entire structure were torn down?

    I've heard ugly cases of toxic mold situations in homes created by CLEAN water leaks, but when you add the muck to it, isn't it likely to be deadly?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    at home
    Posts
    23,626
    Quote Originally Posted by Pepper
    I heard some woman interested in preserving the architecture and the "black culture" of the neighborhoods affected by the floods. She seemed to think that many of these homes could be rebuilt on the same site, without bulldozing the entire structure down. I am concerned that with the wood framed homes sitting in that toxic stew for weeks, isn't there a concern that toxic mold could develop unless the entire structure were torn down?

    I've heard ugly cases of toxic mold situations in homes created by CLEAN water leaks, but when you add the muck to it, isn't it likely to be deadly?
    The homes that were affected will most likely have to be stripped down to their frames, and if they have to do that, they might just as well bulldoze the home, and rebuild it, as it would probably be less expensive.

    It's going to be a mess, that is for certain.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    10,829
    Ya know, I've been thinking this since the beginning. Even those homes still standing, but having all that water...I just can't believe it wouldn't be an ongoing battle, between structural issues (rotting wood, etc.) to environmental/health - mold, etc. What a true mess. I'm sure many people would want to "save" their home, or feel it would be cheaper than bulldozing it down to the foundation...but I would think long-term, a lot would be better off just leveling it. Oh, but what a heartbreaker for many....

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,681
    Espcially when Toxic mold can hide behind walls, and anywhere.

    I did a case with Toxic mold, the entire house had to be demolished, if it is in one area it will be everywhere else, even if you can't see it.

    Mold is so widespread that I can't even begin to "elobaorate" on insurance and health nightmares........

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    10,829
    Quote Originally Posted by CyberLaw
    Espcially when Toxic mold can hide behind walls, and anywhere.

    I did a case with Toxic mold, the entire house had to be demolished, if it is in one area it will be everywhere else, even if you can't see it.

    Mold is so widespread that I can't even begin to "elobaorate" on insurance and health nightmares........
    Yes, a few years ago it was like pulling teeth trying to get homeowner's insurance due to prior mold claims. When I moved here in 2002, State Farm, Farmer's, USAA would NOT write new policies. I had to go with some small company in the beginning, and the rates were astronomical. Then in 2003, since I had Farmer's for auto, they released each agent to write 10 new home policies. My rate was $1,000 less than the year before, thank goodness. Lots of litigation here....