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  1. #1
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    Canada, First Nations student deaths inquest: 7 youths died in 10 years.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunde...255052?cmp=rss
    Inquest, which begins Monday, will be one of the largest in Ontario's history

    CBC News Posted: Oct 03, 2015 5:00 AM ET
    hi-inquest-composite-852.jpg


    `` A joint inquest into the deaths of seven First Nations students begins Oct. 5 in Thunder Bay, Ont.

    All of the students died between 2000 and 2011 while attending high school in the city, hundreds of kilometres away from their remote First Nations where access to education is limited.

    Three of them were just 15 years old when their bodies were pulled from a local river. Two other teens are suspected of drowning while two more may have overdosed. The inquest is expected to fully examine the circumstances of their deaths and make recommendations to prevent others.

    The inquest is expected to hear from about 200 witnesses and is scheduled to run until March 2016.``

  2. #2
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    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunde...wers-1.3249124

    "The families of some of the First Nations students, whose deaths will be the subject of an inquest starting Oct. 5 in Thunder Bay, Ont., are expressing their hopes and fears about the process.

    The mothers of Paul Panacheese, Jordan Wabasse and Jethro Anderson issued statements on Wednesday, through their lawyer.

    All of their sons, along with four other teens — Curran Strang, Robyn Harper, Reggie Bushie and Kyle Morriseau — died after leaving home to attend high school in Thunder Bay. The inquest will investigate the circumstances surrounding their deaths and make recommendations for preventing other similar deaths in the future.

    "Half of me wants to know what happened to Jethro, and the other half of me wants to leave it alone," said Anderson's mother Stella, adding that her "heart shattered into a million pieces" when she heard Jethro's body was found in 2000. He was 15.

    "A lot has happened over the past fifteen years, I have made positive life changes," she said. "I miss Jethro every day and the thought of learning more about his death is frightening and brings up old wounds that have been slowly healing."

  3. #3
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    http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2...under-bay.html

    "On Friday, the families of the lost youth were shocked to learn that the room chosen in the new Thunder Bay courthouse for the hearing is quite small, and that just 10 seats will be available at the back for the seven families, their supporters and members of the public.

    An overflow room has been set up inside the building, but for Nishnawbe Aski Nation Grand Chief Alvin Fiddler, this is not an acceptable solution.

    “This is disgusting,” Fiddler said. “The parents and families of the seven have the right to be in the room (as the inquest proceeds).”

  4. #4
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    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunde...eads-1.3265316
    rbbm.

    "First Nations student deaths inquest: 'Help us,' mom pleads
    'They were made fun of, eggs were thrown at them,' mother says of son's experience in Thunder Bay"



    "The mother of one of the First Nations students who died while he was away from home attending high school in Thunder Bay is asking for help to help keep other students safe in the Ontario city.

    The death of Paul Panacheese, along with those of six other First Nations students, is the subject of one of the largest inquests in Ontario history. It began on Oct. 5 and is scheduled to run through to March 2016.

    All of the students, aged 15 to 21, left their remote First Nations in northern Ontario to attend high school in Thunder Bay. None of their communities have schools that go beyond grade 10. They died between 2000 and 2011.


    "As a mom you want your children to be successful and get a good education," Maryanne Panacheese said about her decision to let Paul leave his home in Mishkeegogamang First Nation, about 300 kilometres northwest of Thunder Bay, and come to the city for high school.

    "I just want to say to the city of Thunder Bay, those are our kids coming out for education," Panacheese said in an exclusive interview with CBC News. "I just want to tell them, can you help us.? Can you help our kids get education, because we need them in our communities for things to change in our communities."

  5. #5
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    Slightly OT but may I say how much I like the term "First Nations people"?

    I use the term "Native Americans" because I believe in the right of groups to choose their own labels and even though the Native Americans I've known say they are comfortable being called "American Indians".

    But most of my ancestors have been "native" to these shores since the 1600s; my most recent forefathers arrived over 200 years ago. Now I realize that isn't as long as the 12,000 years since the first humans supposedly arrived from Siberia, but implying that I'm an "immigrant American" seems misleading at best.

    "First Nations" not only solves the problem of accuracy, but pays proper tribute to the fact that pre-Columbian peoples built complex civilizations, large metropolitan areas, extensive trade routes, and sophisticated forms of government. I.e., they built "nations", not just "tribes".

    Leave it to the Canadians...

  6. #6
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    OT, and FWIW, 'First Nations' (I like the term too) only refers to one category of Aboriginal Canadians -- there are also the Metis and the Inuit, both of which are distinct. Each of the three categories (FN, Metis, and Inuit) seems much more popular to its members than the broader term 'Aboriginal', which to many seems like a forced abstraction.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Montjoy View Post
    OT, and FWIW, 'First Nations' (I like the term too) only refers to one category of Aboriginal Canadians -- there are also the Metis and the Inuit, both of which are distinct. Each of the three categories (FN, Metis, and Inuit) seems much more popular to its members than the broader term 'Aboriginal', which to many seems like a forced abstraction.
    Thank you, Montjoy. Obviously I didn't realize the Inuit weren't included among the First Nations people and I'd never heard of the Métis, despite their significant population in the U.S. Midwest. (For those as clueless as I, the Inuit didn't arrive until approximately 1,000 CE; and the Métis began with unions between European men and Native women, but developed a separate and unique culture over the ensuing centuries.)

    I don't know about Canada, but I think part of the reason "aboriginal" never caught on here in the States is that we associate the term too closely with Australia. But I agree with you: the word sounds so anthropological it might refer to Neanderthal or Cro-Magnon peoples. LOL.

  8. #8
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    http://www.cbc.ca/interactives/longf...s-youth-death/

    Deep water

    Between 2000 and 2011, five First Nations teens died in the rivers of Thunder Bay. All these years later, there are no clear reasons why. One grieving father has developed his own theory for his son’s death — and believes it holds the key to greater understanding of indigenous struggles.

    By Jody Porter

    April 4, 2016

    The part of the McIntyre River that flows past the movie theatre, Intercity mall and the big box stores in Thunder Bay, Ont., isn’t much of a river at all.

    It’s part of a man-made floodway built in the 1970s to protect the city from high waters.

    But in recent years, instead of saving lives, the McIntyre has been taking them.

    In 2005, the body of a missing First Nations teen turned up in the part of the river where the murky water trickles past an industrial parking lot towards a Shoppers Drug Mart.

  9. #9
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    http://cnews.canoe.com/CNEWS/Canada/.../22647092.html
    Aboriginal leaders say the questions being raised at an Ontario inquest into the deaths of seven First Nations high school students will be echoed by the forthcoming inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women. Nishnawbe Aski Nation Grand Chief Alvin Fiddler, shown in a recent handout photo, says some of the main threads at the inquest include how the deaths were investigated and the degree of communication with officials and families. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Nishnawbe Aski Nation)

    Jury verdicts on deaths of seven aboriginals in Thunder Bay, Ont.

    Inquest jurors examining the deaths of seven aboriginal youths in Thunder Bay, Ont., have issued their verdicts:

    Paul Panacheese, 21, collapsed at home: Undetermined

    Robyn Harper, 18, died at boarding home: Accident

    Jethro Anderson, 15, drowning, alcohol involved: Undetermined

    Curran Strang, 18, drowning, alcohol involved: Accident

    Reggie Bushie, 15, drowning, alcohol involved: Accident

    Kyle Morrisseau, 17, drowning, alcohol involved: Undetermined

    Jordan Wabasse, 15, drowning: Undetermined

  10. #10
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    https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/...etermined.html

    for-na-seveninquest02.jpg
    The recommendations included basics: Schools for every single northern First Nation community that wants one. Early childhood education, daycare and schools funded equally to every single other Ontario school. Clean water and working sewers for all northern First Nation reserves. Gymnasiums, music and art class, cafeterias that serve three meals a day to students.

    And some of the inquest recommendations were simply heartbreaking: The ability for impoverished students to be given the means to phone their parents while they are away at school in Thunder Bay. The opportunity for these students to fly home in the fall, at Christmas and March Break. Basic standards and inspections in boarding homes for students, including criminal records checks of boarding parents. The removal of asbestos and boilers and a new heating system for Dennis Franklin Cromarty High School, where six of the students went to school.

    Bernice Jacob, mother of Jordan Wabasse, spoke of how hard the inquest has been on her family.

    “I have three other sons back home. Two of them are in high school. I didn’t allow them to come out to the city to further their education. We have a high school in our community of Webequie First Nation but I’m glad the recommendations recognized we need better funding in our own communities so our kids don’t have to leave until they are older and ready to be on their own,” Jacob said before she broke down into sobs.

    “We want everyone to be treated equally as we are all human.”


  11. #11
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    https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/...etermined.html
    na003.jpg

    Jordan Wabasse

    A Grade 9 student and star hockey player from Webequie First Nation, got off the bus at the stop near his boarding house late on Feb. 7, 2011 and he disappeared into the -20C night. A massive three-month search for Wabasse, led by his parents and members of his community, ended when his body was pulled from the Kaministiquia River.
    Kyle Morrisseau, 17

    The grandson of the famed Ojibwa artist Norval Morrisseau, who is often referred to as the “Picasso of the North.” Morrisseau was said to be blessed with his grandfather’s talent and by the time of his death, he had already shown his art professionally in galleries. His body was pulled from the McIntyre River on Nov. 10, 2009. Thunder Bay police say his death is still “an open file” as they have three possibilities as to what happened to Kyle, reported the CBC: The man he was last seen with had something to do with why he was in the river
    na00.jpg
    Curran Strang

    Had been near a local floodway on Sept. 22, 2005, and was said to have been drinking earlier with friends. His body was found four days later with “evidence of drowning,” the inquest heard. Strang is from Pikangikum First Nation, a reserve struggling with unemployment, no drinkable water and one of the highest youth suicide rates in the North.
    na00.jpg
    Robyn Harper

    From Keewaywin First Nation, is the only girl of the seven students. She died alone in the doorway of her boarding home after being dropped off by a patrol team from Dennis Franklin Cromarty High School, who picked her up because they found her drunk on the street. She had been at the school in Thunder Bay for only one week
    na00.jpg
    Jethro Anderson

    Was found dead on Nov. 11, 2000, less than one month after his 15th birthday. Anderson, who spoke only Oji-Cree until Grade 7, called the remote Kasabonika First Nation home. Kasabonika is 400 km north of Sioux Lookout in northwestern Ontario. His mother, Stella, reluctantly let her son go to school in Thunder Bay alone so he could realize his dream of becoming a police officer. His death was ruled as undetermined by the inquest jury.
    na00.jpg
    Paul Panacheese

    The oldest of the seven, lived in 10 different boarding houses when he first came to attend high school in Thunder Bay. Lost, he moved from house to house. At one placement, above a Chinese restaurant, six boys were crammed into the apartment and the owners put padlocks on the fridge and cupboards if the boys missed suppertime
    Reggie Bushie
    Was last seen at the McIntyre River with his older brother, Ricki, on Oct. 26, 2007. Bushie’s body was found in the river, days later, on Nov. 1. Originally, the inquest into his death was stopped by lawyers for Nishnawbe Aski Nation due to a lack of indigenous representation on the jury. This sparked a greater, provincial review on indigenous participation on jury rolls led by former Supreme Court of Canada Justice Frank Iacobucci. The inquest ruled his death by drowning.
    Last edited by dotr; 06-29-2016 at 12:39 PM.

  12. #12
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    https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/...ung-lives.html

    fallenfeathers2.jpg
    The day after 145 inquest recommendations were released on the deaths of seven indigenous students in Thunder Bay, Christian Morrisseau woke at 4 a.m., overwhelmed with aching grief.

    Morrisseau’s 17-year-old son, Kyle, was one of the seven who died between 2000 to 2011 while they were away attending school.

    Kyle’s body was pulled from the McIntyre River in Thunder Bay on Nov. 10, 2009. A coroner’s inquest ruled on June 28 that Kyle’s death was “undetermined,” leaving the family with few answers as to what exactly happened to their son in his final hours.

    Morrisseau, 46, thought he would feel some sense of closure after the eight-month long inquest into the students’ deaths finished.

    But closure never came.

    “I got up before the sunrise thinking, ‘It is over now. What is next?’ There was an emptiness inside me. It didn’t feel over.”

    Morrisseau, who learned to paint at the hand of his father, Canada’s great Ojibwa artist Norval Morrisseau, felt he had to do something to honour the memory of his son and the six other students.

    That morning, he began to create a painting that came to him in a vision. He spent the next few days painting, non-stop, a gigantic canvas he entitled, Seven Fallen Feathers. His unique style is known as the Woodland School of Art. Strong, black lines illustrate humans, spirits and animals. Bright, deep colours bring Anishinaabe stories and legends to life. Ojibwa, Cree, Algonquin and Oji-Cree are all Anishinaabe.



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