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  1. #1
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    More destructive hurricanes to come?

    I found this in Britains Independent. Anybody seen a prediction of a major hit on New York in a US source?

    Experts warn New York: you could be next
    Experts are predicting still more hurricanes, in what could be the worst year for the storms since records began. The US government's official National Hurricane Center and scientists at Colorado State University, who predicted both Katrina and Rita, expect several more named storms in the remaining two months of the hurricane season. And the World Meteorological Organisation believes that the record of 21, set in 1933, may be beaten.

    Some of these storms could hit the US, and experts say New York could be the next city to be devastated. The area around the Big Apple is listed by the Center as the fifth most vulnerable in the country, after New Orleans, the Florida Keys, Tampa in Florida and Galveston in Texas, all targeted by hurricanes in the past two years.

    Max Mayfield, director of the Center, told Congress that Katrina "will not be the last major hurricane to hit a vulnerable area, and New Orleans is not the only location vulnerable to a large disaster from a land-falling hurricane".

    Local experts say that such a catastrophe is "inevitable", and the New York City authorities warn that it could bring a 30ft-high storm surge crashing into Manhattan.

    The city says at least a million New Yorkers are at risk, and has drawn up plans to evacuate those within 10 blocks of the water. But the city could have less warning than Texas or Louisiana, since hurricanes move faster as they head northwards.

  2. #2
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    The Hurricane season still has two full months to run (ends at the end of Nov.), so it can be expected that there will be a few more hurricanes impacting the U.S.. This year is very significant in that it has produced the No. 3 strongest hurricane in known history, Rita, and also the No. 5 strongest hurricane in known history, Katrina. That's a strong statement. Who knows what is next???

  3. #3
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    Thanks Cypros, I was just going to go to a weather map of the Carribean and see what's cookin' down there.

    Last night on the news it did show the beginning of what looked like another storm brewing which they said would be carefully watched. It had the look like Rita did before she became a real hurricane.

    And I was thinking how ironic it is that both Katrina and Rita ended up going on land in such a pinpointed area - the State of La. Amazing when you think about it. And it might be an indication that with the warmer waters now this is a natural path for any hurricane to follow. I know that is a pretty general statement, but will be curious to see if it pans out and the next hurricane ends up in the same spot.


    Scandi

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzzm1
    The Hurricane season still has two full months to run (ends at the end of Nov.), so it can be expected that there will be a few more hurricanes impacting the U.S.. This year is very significant in that it has produced the No. 3 strongest hurricane in known history, Rita, and also the No. 5 strongest hurricane in known history, Katrina. That's a strong statement. Who knows what is next???
    I think you got the hurricanes reversed.
    And in terms of the dollar amount of damage, I think Katrina is the worst of this century, if not ever.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cypros
    I found this in Britains Independent. Anybody seen a prediction of a major hit on New York in a US source?

    Experts warn New York: you could be next
    Experts are predicting still more hurricanes, in what could be the worst year for the storms since records began. The US government's official National Hurricane Center and scientists at Colorado State University, who predicted both Katrina and Rita, expect several more named storms in the remaining two months of the hurricane season. And the World Meteorological Organisation believes that the record of 21, set in 1933, may be beaten.

    Some of these storms could hit the US, and experts say New York could be the next city to be devastated. The area around the Big Apple is listed by the Center as the fifth most vulnerable in the country, after New Orleans, the Florida Keys, Tampa in Florida and Galveston in Texas, all targeted by hurricanes in the past two years.

    Max Mayfield, director of the Center, told Congress that Katrina "will not be the last major hurricane to hit a vulnerable area, and New Orleans is not the only location vulnerable to a large disaster from a land-falling hurricane".

    Local experts say that such a catastrophe is "inevitable", and the New York City authorities warn that it could bring a 30ft-high storm surge crashing into Manhattan.

    The city says at least a million New Yorkers are at risk, and has drawn up plans to evacuate those within 10 blocks of the water. But the city could have less warning than Texas or Louisiana, since hurricanes move faster as they head northwards.
    NYC rarely gets hurricanes, but it does get Noreasters, which is the cold water equivalent of a hurricane. I lived in the city during a particularly nasty one, in the early 1990s, with 60mph gusts, torrential rain, blizzard-like snow AND thunder & lightning! Like Lewis Black said, they don't even have crap like that in the Bible. My apartment faced the East River, and there were times I thought the fire escape (which was pretty sturdy) was going to come off the side of the building.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyGoatGruff
    I think you got the hurricanes reversed.
    And in terms of the dollar amount of damage, I think Katrina is the worst of this century, if not ever.
    No, Rita is ranked at No. 3, and Katrina is ranked at No. 5; they base the ranking on the lowest pressure; Rita was 897mb, and Katrina was 902mb, at their lowest. In terms of dollar damage, Andrew was 26.5 billion; Katrina is somewhere between 100 billion and 200 billion, so Katrina is far, and away, the most damaging in terms of dollars. Katrina is 3rd in the number of deaths.

    KATRINA
    Wind Speed at Landfall, 140mph-----Maiximum Wind Speed, 175mph
    HURRICANE FORCE WINDS EXTEND 105 MILES FROM THE CENTER...
    TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 230 MILES.
    MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...923 MB. (at landfall) 902 MB (at its lowest)

    RITA
    Wind Speed at Landfall, 120mph-----Maximum Wind Speed, 175mph
    HURRICANE FORCE WINDS EXTEND 85 MILES FROM THE CENTER
    TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 205 MILES.
    MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...937 MB (at landfall), 897 MB (at its lowest)
    This is the 3rd lowest pressure on record-- Gilbert 888 MB, 1935 LABOR DAY 892 MB, Rita 897 MB