719 users online (83 members and 636 guests)  


Websleuths News


Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 113
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070
    http://extra.ie/news/world-news/who-was-molly-martens

    She had made it onto the school swim team and although not as talented as her peers, in her own mind, she was a champ. Like her brothers, having a ‘winning’ mentality was drilled into her from a very young age.
    Her mother Sharon was a doctor of mathematics who had attended the prestigious Emory University in Georgia and her father Tom, an FBI agent, was also a trained attorney.

    In the barometer of success in life, everything was measured by achievement. Described as ‘pillars of society’ by those who knew them, the Martens aspired to a life of prestige and affluence, complete with children who fitted perfectly into that very same mould.
    The only problem was that Molly didn’t quite fit. And when she failed to live up to expectations, her parents were going to make sure nobody knew why
    She was very good at swimming but she had physical health problems and she missed a lot of school because of that.’
    ‘She started crying over something one day,’ said Rita Stallard. ‘When some asked what was going on her friends said she had some issues and that she didn’t like to talk about it.’After her junior year, Molly allegedly had more time off school. ‘She never finished,’ said one neighbour. ‘Everyone was told it was because of her foot.She had several jobs, all of the casual variety, but she never earned enough money independently to keep her in the lifestyle to which she was accustomed. By 2004, she had a job as a receptionist in Visage hair salon in downtown Knoxville.‘I am very involved in my faith, my mother is a preacher, and I talked about this a lot with Molly.‘She was starting to share the same views and her parents were not happy and made that clear,’ he added. The couple, who moved into an apartment in nearby Oakridge, haven’t spoken since the split, despite parting on amicable terms.‘‘She did suffer a lot with health problems to do with her foot,’ he said. ‘She had some condition that required a lot of surgery and it meant she was off work a lot.’

    Sometime after her relationship with Jeremiah ended, Molly became romantically involved with Keith Maginn.
    By then she had tried her hand at modelling, but steady work wasn’t forthcoming as a result. On February 22, 2007, almost a year before she met widowed father-of-two Jason Corbett, Keith and Molly went on their first date.To her credit, Molly told me early on in the relationship that she is bipolar,’ Keith said.‘I didn’t think much about it because medications had her stabilised and everything was blissful and bright. A month or two into our relationship, she got a staph infection. The infection medications she was given overrode her bipolar medications and knocked everything out of balance. Like someone flipped a light switch.

    ‘Molly was the saddest person I had ever been around. She would cry in bed for hours. Seeing the person I loved suffering so much was a very trying situation. I did everything I could, but nothing seemed to help.’
    Unable to continue her job as a nanny, Molly stayed at home while Keith earned rent money for them both.
    ‘It was paid to her parents just like you would pay rent to any landlord,’ he says. ‘Molly couldn’t work any more so it was down to me. I was supporting us both. We were paying rent to her parents. I think if she was on her own they would have helped her more [financially].
    ‘But knowing that she was in a relationship they were kind of like, “You guys need to make this happen.” They would have paid for anything major that came up, but for the most part she was financially dependent on me. I paid the rent, bought groceries, paid the bills. You don’t make much money working for a non-profit. We were scraping by on my salary.’At the beginning, the relationship was ‘amazing’. According to Mr Maginn, they both genuinely cared about each other and because they were both struggling, had a mutual respect and tenderness.
    ‘Once her depression took over, things were stressful,’ he says. ‘Heartbreaking, actually. I never knew what mood Molly would be in when I got home from work. I walked on eggshells much of the time, trying my best to keep things stable. But things were usually tense.
    ‘We were both going down on a sinking ship. For better or worse, mental illness has such a negative stigma and Molly didn’t want people to know the truth of the situation… I finally swallowed my pride and sought out a therapist.’
    As the relationship came under increasing strain, Keith became concerned by the ‘plethora’ of drugs Molly was taking. At one point, he claims, she was taking 16 prescribed medications a day and another ten to be used ‘as needed’.
    ‘Most of the stuff she was taking was for bipolar or manic depression,’ the self-help author says.
    ‘So she was taking some serious drugs. They were prescribed, it wasn’t like she was doing it on her own. She was insomniac, so she sometimes would be up all night. She was taking stuff for that. She had a tremendous amount of stuff on her plate.’Against this turbulent background, Molly’s relationship with her parents, Thomas and Sharon, became tense, according to Keith. After years spent trying to deal with Molly’s many problems, he says they too had become ‘exasperated’ by her behaviour.
    ‘Her parents were very much aware of her mental health issues,’ he says. ‘They are well aware of the many doctors, the medications she was taking. They knew about it all. They did try to help. They lived relatively close and they would come over. I don’t know how much they actually helped but they tried to. I felt that they were at times overwhelmed and frustrated about the whole thing.’
    In a bid to preserve his girlfriend’s delicate state, Keith surrendered to Molly’s ‘pleas’ to get engaged. On her birthday, he arranged for the couple to return to Pelancho’s, the Mexican restaurant in downtown Knoxville where they had spent their first date.
    In his book he says he couldn’t afford a decent ring, so picked out a ‘for now’ ring on Overstock.com for less than $150.
    ‘It was completely her idea to get engaged,’ he told Extra.ie. ‘She really thought being engaged would make her happy. She thought that was going to be the cure. I knew it was not but I thought it would help for a while. It worked for like one day.The next day she was back. She was super happy for a day and then the next day she was crying. I had no intention of marrying her until she got better but I was okay with being engaged just because I thought it might help.’
    When getting engaged failed to give Molly a lift, she turned to other ways of finding fulfilment.
    ‘She was always saying that kids would make her happy,’ says Keith. ‘She ended up getting pregnant. I was terrified because I knew how many medications. I was terrified.’Five months later, in February 2008, with no improvement in her condition, Molly checked in to a ‘medical rehabilitation centre’ in Atlanta, Georgia. The hospital fees for her stay in the one-hall monitored ward of Emory Hospital were paid for by her parents.
    ‘The psych ward in Atlanta was a last-ditch attempt to try and get her medications right,’ Keith told Extra.ie. ‘It was to try to get her off all the stuff she was on and get her on the one or two things that could make her stable. It was very heartwrenching. The people that were in there… It was hard to recognise them as human sometimes. The sounds they were making, just staring at the walls.But all was not well in the marriage. Jason had been resisting persistent attempts by his wife to adopt his two children. Sources say she became ‘obsessed’ with them both, in particular, Sarah. Molly had led neighbours in the area to believe that she was their biological mother, even describing her pregnancy with Sarah to one. To add further strain to the marriage, Jason was deeply unhappy in the United States.
    He was incredibly homesick and missed his friends and family. He had become down on life and had started to gain a lot of weight. Molly goaded him about putting on the pounds. The night before the killing, the couple were at a gathering at a friend’s house where she made a remark about his weight in front of them. Jason left early.
    The following night, August 2, 2015, Molly and her father beat Jason to death. After they were charged, it was back to a life of privilege and protection in Farragut. From the comfort of her hometown and the added protective shelter of her childhood home, she quietly began ‘moving forward’ with her life.
    In a change from her previous incarnation as a ‘stay-at-home mom’, she has enrolled as a student at Pellissippi State College, where she took up a course studying interior design. Her mother Sharon, who teaches in the college maths department, would never be far away.
    In a photo posted on a social networking site associated with the course, Molly can be seen striking a sultry pose next to her classmates after winning a prize for ‘best presentation’. There were field trips to IKEA, where Molly playfully posed for the camera lying across a bed, and social outings with friends where she was spotted ‘glammed up to the nines’, seemingly without a care in the world.
    Outside her studies, the former swim coach threw herself back in to the world of swimming, taking part in the Tennessee Open water series last summer. In a series of pictures of the event the blonde can be seen swimming alongside competitors at a swim meet.
    Waiting close by on the jetty at Kingston Waterfront Park, after ferrying his daughter from their luxury Knoxville home, her father, ex-FBI agent Tom, passed the time watching the action. Few knew that both were facing second-degree murder charges and those who did knew not to mention it.
    Throughout the trial Molly would retreat home to Tennessee at the weekends under the watchful eye of Tom and Sharon, carrying on with life as normal. But this time they couldn’t cover up the ugly truth.
    Yesterday, as they were laid away in handcuffs, the gig was finally up

    http://extra.ie/news/world-news/who-was-molly-martens

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070
    <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/US/juror-father-daughter-murder-trial-doubt-mind-guilty/story?id=49141218" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">[VIDEO]https://www.youtube.com/watch?<a href="http://abcnews.go.com/US/juror-father-daughter-murder-trial-doubt-mind-guilty/story?id=49141218" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">
    Juror in father-daughter murder trial: 'No doubt in my mind' guilty verdict was 'right choice'

    Martens and Molly Corbett claimed Jason Corbett was choking her on the night of Aug. 2, 2015, when Martens intervened and hit him with a baseball bat. Martens testified that Molly told him she also struck Jason with a paving stone that was on her nightstand, though Martens claims he didn't see it happen. They both said they were convinced Jason was trying to kill her and they were defending themselves and each other against him.
    The medical examiner’s report said Jason Corbett was hit at least 10 times and the cause of death was ruled blunt force trauma.
    “To me, the choking did not occur,” Figueroa said. Jury foreman Tom Aamland and another juror, Nancy Perez, agreed.
    “Once you hit a certain point and you do not stop, manslaughter or self-defense goes off the table,” Figueroa said. “Once that point was matched where you could have stopped then and there, once the person was no longer an aggressor, if that were the case, and you continue, it’s no longer self-defense.”
    Another major factor in their verdict decision, they said, was the gruesome crime scene photos. Perez said the first image of Jason Corbett’s body she saw was so graphic that she vomited in the North Carolina courtroom.
    The three jurors said they believe Molly Corbett and her father took some time after Jason died to conspire before they called 911, and they said the prosecution’s argument that investigators said Martens and Molly Corbett didn’t appear to have any injuries was telling. Figueroa said she even believes Molly Corbett struck her husband first with the paving stone while he was sleeping.
    “I think at some point Dad came to help out and cover it up,” Figueroa said. “There was blood on the pillow and on the comforter. That may have been the first blow, and then it progressed from that point where he got out of bed and she might have struck him more than one time in bed.”

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070
    http://www.independent.ie/irish-news...-36023539.html

    'The choking did not occur' - Two jurors believe Jason Corbett was asleep when he was first struck by Molly Martens

    Molly Corbett told ABC News "20/20" in her pre-trial interview that she had once been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, but this information was never revealed at trial.

    Figueroa and Perez also said they stared at Molly and made notes about what triggered Molly's emotions - and what didn't.
    "Yes. Every time that they would talk about the kids, I was like, 'Molly's crying.' They'd show the pictures of her husband and his skull, 'Molly doesn't seem to be affected,' said Ms Perez.
    Ms Perez went further in her observations of Molly's character.

    "I think Molly is a person that has not been ever held accountable for any actions whatsoever. I think Molly was Daddy's princess, just like every girl is in Daddy's eyes. I feel like Molly was very manipulative."
    Though it didn't come up at trial, Molly claimed in her interview with "20/20" that Jason had been an abusive husband for years, though the jurors argued the defense didn’t present proof of that.
    “The defense did not once suggest any of that,” Ms Figueroa said.
    "So we as jurors, or me as a juror, cannot take that into consideration because it was never presented as a possibility.”

    “We had to go by what we heard,” Mr Aamland said.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070
    http://www.independent.ie/irish-news...-36021166.html

    Ex-FBI agent Thomas Martens in protective custody as he's deemed 'at risk' from prisoners

    However, if the North Carolina Parole Board does not decide to grant them maximum remission on the remainder of their sentences, they could serve up to 25 years.
    Both have signalled that they will appeal the convictions and sentences.

    Martens's legal team had warned the trial, in the sentencing hearing, that any lengthy prison term for him could effectively represent a life sentence.
    Before they left Davidson County courts complex, they were asked to change from their clothing and into regulation blue denims.

    In Martens-Corbett's case, it was a blue denim dress and, in Martens's case, blue denim trousers and a light blue shirt.
    Both were transferred to Raleigh prisons - some two hours away - in handcuffs and waist chains.

    Martens is now being held at the notorious Central Prison in Raleigh.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070
    I feel like I have ruined my father's life,' brazen killer Molly told TV station

    It makes me feel like, you know, I've ruined his life. That I've impacted my whole family," said the shameless killer. "And it's not a good feeling."
    The jury convicted the pair of second-degree murder, after hearing horrific evidence of the beating that Mr Corbett suffered.However, the jurors ultimately believed that Mr Corbett was murdered both by his wife and father-in-law, who used a brick and baseball bat to administer a flurry of brutal blows.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070
    http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/courts/molly-sent-bill-for-removal-of-jasons-body-to-his-parents-36021162.html
    Molly sent bill for removal of Jason's body to his parents


    Corbett family to shield children from woman who killed their father

    Molly Martens-Corbett had the bill for the ambulance that removed the body of Limerick man Jason Corbett from their North Carolina home sent to the Corbett family, his former sister-in-law has claimed.
    "She made everything difficult from the start. She didn't just murder him, she caused a lot of hurt.

    "After his death, she even sent the bill for Jason's ambulance from the night he died to his parents.
    "I just want to close the door, I don't want to hear about the Martens any more," she told RTÉ's Sean O'Rourke.The Corbett family left the US yesterday to return to Ireland as they vowed to shield Mr Corbett's two young children from Martens-Corbett.
    The family, led by Jason's sister Tracey and her husband David Lynch, endured a gruelling four-week North Carolina murder trial.

    Both are now en route back to Ireland where Jason's two children, Jack (12) and Sarah (10), are in the care of the extended Corbett family.
    "We all just want to get home," Mrs Lynch said. "It has been difficult, very difficult. But we came here to see justice done for Jason. We believe we have."Mrs Lynch said that her entire family was grateful for the work of the Davidson County District Attorney's Office, led by Garry Frank, and the Davidson County Sheriff's Office, led by David S Grice.Mrs Lynch said the family put their trust in the jury of nine women and three men - and were deeply grateful for how the jury diligently pursued truth and justice.


  8. #68
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070
    Indicators' show that Molly Martens planned brutal killing of Jason Corbett as graphic new images show the tragic events

    • Police and prosecutors were deeply concerned over "indicators" the tragic events in the master bedroom early that morning may not have been from an impromptu confrontation that tragically escalated out of control
    • Concerns over sedative and brick on nightstand
    • First degree murder charges were considered against Molly Martens and her father Thomas Martens

    The Irish Independent has now learned both police and prosecutors were deeply concerned over "indicators" the tragic events in the master bedroom early that morning may not have been from an impromptu confrontation that tragically escalated out of control.
    These included:

    The presence of the powerful sedative trazodone in Mr Corbett's system, a medication which was prescribed to his wife just two days beforehand.
    The unexpected visit to the Corbett home of Martens-Corbett's parents on August 1, and the fact up to half a dozen calls were received by the elderly couple from their daughter while en route from Knoxville that night.The fact Martens-Corbett inexplicably kept a brick on her nightstand table.
    The presence of a large impact blood spatter on the quilt and underneath the box mattress, indicating Mr Corbett may have been asleep in bed when first struck.An ongoing and bitter dispute between Mr Corbett, his wife and her family over his refusal to sign adoption papers to allow her equal rights to his two children by his first wife.
    Indications Mr Corbett was planning to travel to Limerick to attend his father's 80th birthday party with his children but without his wife. Martens-Corbett was apparently concerned the children would not return with him.Assistant District Attorney Alan Martin said it was possible Martens-Corbett had spiked a mint mojito drink given to her husband on August 1 but failed to properly dose him with the sedative.
    "Why didn't they stop [the assault] - why didn't they stop? Even when he was lying dead on the bedroom floor," he said.

    Ultimately, it was decided to proceed with second-degree murder charges against the father and daughter, with a fall-back charge option for the jury of voluntary manslaughter.
    In North Carolina, a conviction for first-degree murder can carry the death penalty.

    Parole
    If the death penalty is not imposed, those convicted face the prospect of life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.
    The Corbett family paid glowing tribute to the Davidson County Sheriff's Office under Sheriff David S Grice and the Davidson County District Attorney's Office under Mr Frank.

    As the father and daughter began their sentences, new pictures emerged of the aftermath of the brutal killing. They include images of the crime scene and the brick and baseball bat used in the murder. There are also pictures of a bedraggled-looking Martens-Corbett, wearing just pyjamas and a fur coat, on the night her husband was killed.

    http://www.independent.ie/irish-news...-36021396.html


  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070
    http://extra.ie/news/irish-news/jason-corbett-family

    ‘They Thought We Were A Small Family From Ireland Who Wouldn’t Fight, But We Did’ Corbett Family

    I want you to understand the impact his murder has had on his family and on his mother.

    I want you to understand how the actions of Molly Martens and her father have impacted on Sarah and Jack, Jason’s children.
    Jason was my baby brother. We were so proud of him. He was charismatic, kind, fun loving, generous and thoughtful. He was a very uplifting and amiable He had gone through hard times when his first wife Mags died, but he kept himself going for Jack and Sarah. He loved his children and was devoted to them.

    He worked very hard to provide for them and make sure they had everything they needed. They also knew he loved them and he doted on them. He did all he could to make them happy.
    Jason was a healthy, happy man. Then that changed for all of us. August 2 will be imprinted in our minds for all the wrong reasons, the day my brother was killed and my niece and nephew were made orphans.person.My parents lost their child and we all lost the most wonderful brother and friend. Our day-to-day lives are lived under constant pressure and worry.
    This was on top of grieving for our loss, on top of custody, on top of guardianship. All because Molly and Tom Martens murdered my brother Jason Corbett. We will never come to terms with Jason’s horrific death.
    He was beaten and battered thousands of miles from his family in his own home. No photographs or evidence will depict for you what we endure every day and how we suffer because of the vision of how Jason died in pain.Was he in pain? Did he cry? How long did he lay there before his last breath? Our hearts will never heal from the sadness we feel.
    Although we are broken, the love and support we have gives us the determination and strength to carry on. We’ve tried to find the words as a family to tell you how Jason’s murder has impacted on our lives, but there really are no adequate words to describe the pain, anger and despair that we’ve felt from his murder.
    Jason’s murder took everything from his children. It took their innocence and security, it made them orphans, it fundamentally changed the course of their lives.

    They sometimes have trouble finding joy in the simple pleasures of life. Being ‘happy’ doesn’t seem ‘right’ any more. They are now painfully aware that there is violence and evil in this world. That they cannot trust because adults break that trust.
    I speak for all my siblings, when I say sometimes the feeling of despair becomes so overwhelming, so oppressive, that it literally takes my breath away. I never know what sound or what sight is going to trigger in my mind a memory. And while the memories of Jason are so precious, with them comes the realisation that he is gone and the visualisation of his battered body… each time that realisation hits my heart and it is devastating.
    We sat here and listened to how he died. Those memories will never leave us as a family. Jason was the baby, my mother Rita and my father John’s youngest child. Their baby did not deserve to be so cruelly taken from them. They did not deserve to have to live the rest of their lives with this pain and without their child.
    My mother has asked to say the following to the court: ‘Jason was my pride and joy. He was kind, generous and sensitive. He wanted to see the people around him happy and he contributed to this with his love for life, devotion and kindness. He was very caring to his family and friends. He was a devoted father to his children Jack and Sarah.‘The day I was told Jason was dead was the worst day of my life. It was 6.10pm on a Sunday evening. My son Wayne had received a brief 30-second call from Sharon Martens, Molly Martens’ mother, to say Jason is dead.
    ‘An ocean divided us but we tried everything, every way to contact Molly. We tried desperately to ring Sharon and Molly back.
    ‘To this day I have never heard from Molly Martens or any of her family since the day of Jason’s murder. Not one word, call or letter to acknowledge I was his mother, that he was dead, nothing.
    ‘No call at the time to allow me to speak with my grandchildren. No contact. A hastily arranged funeral without communicating with his family in Ireland.



    I want you to understand the impact his murder has had on his family and on his mother.

    I want you to understand how the actions of Molly Martens and her father have impacted on Sarah and Jack, Jason’s children.
    Jason was my baby brother. We were so proud of him. He was charismatic, kind, fun loving, generous and thoughtful. He was a very uplifting and amiable person.He had gone through hard times when his first wife Mags died, but he kept himself going for Jack and Sarah. He loved his children and was devoted to them.

    He worked very hard to provide for them and make sure they had everything they needed. They also knew he loved them and he doted on them. He did all he could to make them happy.
    Jason was a healthy, happy man. Then that changed for all of us. August 2 will be imprinted in our minds for all the wrong reasons, the day my brother was killed and my niece and nephew were made orphans.My parents lost their child and we all lost the most wonderful brother and friend. Our day-to-day lives are lived under constant pressure and worry.
    This was on top of grieving for our loss, on top of custody, on top of guardianship. All because Molly and Tom Martens murdered my brother Jason Corbett. We will never come to terms with Jason’s horrific death.
    He was beaten and battered thousands of miles from his family in his own home. No photographs or evidence will depict for you what we endure every day and how we suffer because of the vision of how Jason died in pain.Was he in pain? Did he cry? How long did he lay there before his last breath? Our hearts will never heal from the sadness we feel.
    Although we are broken, the love and support we have gives us the determination and strength to carry on. We’ve tried to find the words as a family to tell you how Jason’s murder has impacted on our lives, but there really are no adequate words to describe the pain, anger and despair that we’ve felt from his murder.
    Jason’s murder took everything from his children. It took their innocence and security, it made them orphans, it fundamentally changed the course of their lives.They sometimes have trouble finding joy in the simple pleasures of life. Being ‘happy’ doesn’t seem ‘right’ any more. They are now painfully aware that there is violence and evil in this world. That they cannot trust because adults break that trust.
    I speak for all my siblings, when I say sometimes the feeling of despair becomes so overwhelming, so oppressive, that it literally takes my breath away. I never know what sound or what sight is going to trigger in my mind a memory. And while the memories of Jason are so precious, with them comes the realisation that he is gone and the visualisation of his battered body… each time that realisation hits my heart and it is devastating.
    We sat here and listened to how he died. Those memories will never leave us as a family. Jason was the baby, my mother Rita and my father John’s youngest child. Their baby did not deserve to be so cruelly taken from them. They did not deserve to have to live the rest of their lives with this pain and without their child.
    My mother has asked to say the following to the court: ‘Jason was my pride and joy. He was kind, generous and sensitive. He wanted to see the people around him happy and he contributed to this with his love for life, devotion and kindness. He was very caring to his family and friends. He was a devoted father to his children Jack and Sarah.‘The day I was told Jason was dead was the worst day of my life. It was 6.10pm on a Sunday evening. My son Wayne had received a brief 30-second call from Sharon Martens, Molly Martens’ mother, to say Jason is dead.


    ‘An ocean divided us but we tried everything, every way to contact Molly. We tried desperately to ring Sharon and Molly back.


    ‘To this day I have never heard from Molly Martens or any of her family since the day of Jason’s murder. Not one word, call or letter to acknowledge I was his mother, that he was dead, nothing.


    ‘No call at the time to allow me to speak with my grandchildren. No contact. A hastily arranged funeral without communicating with his family in Ireland.‘It seemed she wished to wipe our existence out along with Jason’s from Jack and Sarah’s life. My life will never be the same but I tried and am trying every day to carry on the best I can.
    ‘It was very hard because I had to watch Molly and Tom Martens carry on as if nothing had happened, as if they had the right to kill my child, my lovely son Jason. My family and I were and continue to suffer a level of emotional pain that words will never cover.
    ‘I miss Jason so much and see him in front of me every day. Every night when I go to bed and close my eyes all I can see is his battered and bruised body lying on the floor.
    ‘When I come down my stairs each morning, I open my front door looking out remembering Jason coming in saying “Rita, we’re home” and my heart breaks all over again knowing I will never see him. Sometimes I don’t know what to do… shout, roar or go mad but I can’t and will stay strong for my family.
    ‘They are so good and I am so blessed to have them all. Tracey and David are now parents to Jack and Sarah along with their other children Adam and Dean. They are doing their very best for the children and helping us to cope with the trial, it’s so hard to keep going but we all find strength in each other. Our lives will go on.Jason died suffering in such a way, I could never forget what was done to him. It was inhuman and barbaric. Instead of Jason’s warm embrace, I now look at cold marble headstone in a graveyard. My heart is broken and I will never recover.
    ‘It is up to the court to decide Molly and Tom Martens’ sentence and although there will never be justice for Jason, I beg of the court for Jason’s sake, for his family, and for myself, to give Molly and Tom Martens the same leniency that they gave my son.’
    As his sister, I just want to say one more thing. Many people spoke inside and outside this court about what a decent man Jason was. The sentence you pass will be the last thing anyone can do for Jason in this horrific case.
    All we are asking for is justice for Jason, for his family, for his friends and especially for Jack and Sarah.
    http://extra.ie/news/irish-news/jason-corbett-family

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070


    https://www.google.ie/amp/www.dailym...-murdered.html
    Attached Images Attached Images


  11. #71
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070
    Mollys ex wrote a book Mary is Molly

    https://keithmaginn.com/sample-chapter/

    Sample Chapter


    The first chapter from Turning This Thing Around:HELL
    What the hell did we do to deserve this? That question has popped into my head a few dozen times in the past several months. I’m in a ****-hole motel somewhere in Atlanta, but it might as well be a five-star hotel compared to my fiancée’s situation: Mary is in a psych ward being treated for severe bipolar/manic depression. I just got off the phone with her. She was hysterical, begging me to sneak her Coca-Cola and muscle-relaxers.
    I have no idea what to do or how much longer I can take this. Tears are streaming down my face and I am asking God, once again, for help. My life has fallen apart and I see no daylight ahead.
    Mary is still furious with me about check-in night at the “rehabilitation center,” as they delicately call it. She is enraged at me because I refused to give her muscle-relaxers despite strict orders to the contrary. Weaning her off the plethora of medications she was on was the whole idea of bringing her here: sixteen prescribed meds daily and another ten to be used “as needed.” Up to twenty-six different medications a day for one person (and she weighed less than 120 lbs.)!
    And they were not helping; quite the opposite, actually.
    I stood firm on that first night, refusing to “help her pain” by disobeying facility commands. Mary cried and told me to leave; she said I must not really love her. I stalled for a few minutes, waiting for her to change her mind. She did not.
    Hadn’t I proven time after time I would always be there, that I truly loved her and would do anything I could for her? Hadn’t I talked her out of suicide multiple times, holding her on the bathroom floor or in bed as she cried uncontrollably night after night? Didn’t I lay with her in the hospital telling her things would be better someday? And now she’s saying I don’t care and she doesn’t want me around?
    So I left the building.
    I went to my car to think for a few minutes. I decided to go back to Mary’s room. I asked her if she really wanted me to go. She said if I wouldn’t give her the muscle-relaxers, then I should.
    I left again.
    *The Most Loving Thing I Could Dositting outside your prisonwhere they’re trying to figure you outwondering why you?why now?what’s this crazy world all about?Been trying to read a littlebut thinking of you a lotyou’re stuck inside alonewondering if you’ll make it or notI keep tearing uplooking to the skydrops smack the pavementas I ask “oh God, why?”I know you feel so alone maybe someday it will make sense to youwhy I didn’t give you what you asked forthat’s the most loving thing I could doI withheld from youwhat I was ordered not to giveeven when you saidI should leavethere was no reason for you to liveI would give up usmy loveonly if that would help youmaybe someday you will understandthat’s the most loving thing I could do.–KM (February ’08)*
    Mary had been manic on the drive down from Knoxville, Tennessee, the phase of her illness when she felt indescribable euphoria. I dreaded this stage because of the devastating low that inevitably followed. And it wasn’t her; it was a fake happiness, a mirage.
    She’d had these sporadic manic periods for years, often staying awake for days. Mary would finish entire novels in one sitting or jog for miles, despite rarely exercising normally. It was a fantasy-like high, as if she were on hallucinogenic drugs.
    The rehab center was one highly-monitored hallway of rooms. Patients stood inert with blank expressions on their faces. Others stared at bare walls as if there were no life inside them. I could not tell what gender some of the patients were. There were odd, primal sounds coming out of several rooms.
    Nearly all the patients had attempted suicide at least once, some several times. Many were in the midst of electro-shock treatments. It was a sullen, grave place, much like the movie One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest with Jack Nicholson.
    The huge difference to me, of course, was that in this real-life psych ward, my fiancée was the main character.
    Mary was adamant that anyone knew the whole truth of our predicament. A great number of prejudices and stereotypes are associated with mental illness in our society and she did not want to be judged unfairly. Nor did she want pity. My friends and family eventually began to suspect something was not right, but chose not to pry. I admitted to others that Mary struggled with migraines and insomnia–which she did–but no one had a clue how serious her problems were.
    In the meantime, I could feel myself slipping away. I was going down with the ship. My mind was a whirlwind of worry, sadness, confusion and anger. It was overwhelming.
    I feared I was losing my mind.
    Repeatedly, I asked God for help, but things kept getting worse. What did Mary do to deserve this? She was a good person–so great with kids–yet had suffered almost her entire life.
    And, what did I do? I was a good person. Had I not spent years in low-paying jobs helping others instead of chasing a bigger paycheck elsewhere? And for what, so we could struggle with bills and barely afford groceries?
    I often feared Mary would finally give up. She swore she could never do that to me, but she talked about it often.
    We had no idea how long Mary would be at the rehab center. Thank God my boss was understanding and told me to stay as long as I needed and not worry about work right now (I only told my boss that Mary’s health was terrible and we were going to a center to help her regulate her medications). I had very little money, hence the shoddy motel. My “smoke-free” room reeked of cigarettes and had multiple burn holes in the drapes and comforter. The cleaning crew neglected to clean the shavings from the previous guest, which were still on the bathroom counter-top and in the sink. Yet compared to Mary’s circumstances, I had no right to feel sorry for myself.
    After Mary asked me to leave, I drove an hour towards home before I swallowed my pride and returned to be with her. I didn’t know if she would pull through. I didn’t know if either of us would ever be “okay” again. I had no idea how we’d gotten into this mess or if we could get back out.
    Visiting hours at the center were 5 to 9 pm. I spent the days reading and writing, but mostly worrying. I also passed time in a small hospital chapel next door to Mary’s facility, meditating and praying. I prayed mostly for Mary, but–for the first time in years–I also prayed for myself.
    Share this:








    One comment on “Sample Chapter”


    Leave a Reply

    Logged in as donnystephensblog. Log out?


    Notify me of new comments via email.


  14. #74
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070
    Anatomy of a murder: the brutal killing of Jason Corbett

    Dr James also found, from blood impact spatters, that Mr Corbett was struck while on the ground - and with his wife and father-in-law standing over him.
    "There were little bits of Jason all over her," Assistant District Attorney Alan Martin would tell the trial. "That puts her in the thick of it. It is rock solid evidence. That puts her there."Dr James found blood spatters on the inside lower hem of Mr Martens's boxer shorts which meant he had to have been standing directly over Mr Corbett when his skull was struck.
    Pathology evidence indicated Mr Corbett then sustained between one and four blows to the skull when he was already dead.
    Or perhaps the 33-year-old former Knoxville model and swim coach, and her father, a retired FBI agent and counter-intelligence operative, will consider the remarkable forensic work at the Panther Creek Court scene of Lt Frank Young. He preserved the clothing worn by the duo at the scene - and he compiled a video and photographic record of the property hailed as "truly excellent" by Dr James.

    Thanks to his photographic record of the blood-soaked bedroom, hallway and bathroom, Dr James was able to do his work.
    But in truth, the father and daughter are probably much more likely to focus on what wasn't said in Courtroom C over the three weeks of harrowing evidence in the case.

    Jury foreman Tom Aamland revealed that the jury were intrigued by a number of obvious issues that weren't clarified - particularly by the Martens version of precisely what happened in the master bedroom that night.
    Just like Irish jurors, an instinctive sense of curiosity, allied to a healthy common sense perception of something out of the ordinary, flooded through the North Carolina jury.
    What was the young Tennessee woman doing with a heavy and unsightly concrete garden paving brick on her nightstand table that night?

    "We all wondered what it was doing there," Mr Aamland said after the trial finished. No explanation was ever offered to the trial.
    But there were other unanswered questions.
    How on Earth could a 39-year-old, six-foot and 16-stone man grab his wife by the throat and then get engaged in a life-and-death tussle with a 67-year-old retiree and not leave a single mark on either of them?

    Martens-Corbett's clothing wasn't torn, there were no marks on her neck and a delicate filigree bracelet on her wrist wasn't bent, damaged or scratched despite the ordeal she just claimed she had just gone through.
    In that death struggle which ended with Mr Corbett sustaining head injuries so savage they were compared to those in a severe car crash or a fall from a great height, how could Martens recall almost every single blow struck with a metal Louisville Slugger baseball bat and yet not have a single recollection of his son-in-law being struck by a brick?
    That was despite the fact the brick was not only soaked in the Limerick man's blood but was also embedded with his hair fragments and tissue.

    When it was lifted by forensic experts from the bedroom floor, it left its outline in blood on the carpet. Martens similarly hadn't a single mark on him - and his clothing was likewise intact and not torn. The questions for the jury just kept mounting.
    How did the powerful sedative Trazedone end up in Mr Corbett's system when the medication was prescribed for his wife just two days earlier?
    But perhaps most intriguing of all for the jurors was the single most glaring omission from the accounts of both the father and daughter - where was Sharon Martens, their wife and mother, during the violent and prolonged confrontation?

    n the public gallery there were tears of two different kinds.
    On the right side of the court, the Corbett family, their friends and supporters wept in relief.
    Throughout, the family's dignified and courageous approach to the case impressed all who witnessed it.
    Across the aisle, members of the Martens family sobbed uncontrollably. Some were visibly devastated by the verdicts.
    Mrs Martens wept and had to be comforted by her brother, Federal employee and Afghanistan Reconstruction Executive official Michael Earnest.
    Her son sobbed so much he had to hold his head in his hands in a bid to regain his composure.
    Mr Aamland admitted it was difficult for the jury, too.
    Five jurors wept openly as the verdict was handed down and, minutes later, once again as the father and daughter received minimum 20-year prison sentences.
    When they were brought back into the court, the father and daughter were a study in contrasts.
    Martens was impassive but clearly worried as to the upset of his daughter and wife.
    Martens-Corbett was physically shaking with emotion.
    When her father declined the opportunity to address the court, she spoke briefly in an address that was almost incoherent due to sobs and wails.
    "I did not murder my husband," she cried. "My father did not murder my husband.
    "The incidents of August 2 happened as they happened on a somewhat regular basis.
    "The only difference is my father was there," she sobbed.
    Minutes later, the duo were led out of Courtroom C in a phalanx of armed Davidson County bailiffs and sheriffs.
    Just over two hours later, they had changed from their clothing - a simple blue dress and a smart dark suit - into prison issue clothing.
    Both wore handcuffs tied to waist chains as they walked to the waiting prison truck for transfer to high security prisons in Raleigh.
    In Martens's case it was to Central Prison, where he was placed in special protective custody given his law enforcement background.
    In Martens-Corbett's case, it was to the North Carolina Correctional Institute for Women.
    She arrived with a recommendation from Judge Lee that she receive whatever psychological and psychiatric supports she might require.
    Before their prison van left Lexington, their legal teams confirmed they intended to lodge challenges to the convictions with the North Carolina Court of Appeals.
    Mr Earnest, visibly shocked by the verdict, briefly spoke to reporters outside the courthouse.
    "I just want to say, in my opinion, in my personal life this is the most atrocious miscarriage of justice I have ever been a part of," he said.
    Outside the Davidson Courts complex, on Salem Street, just metres from Lexington Post Office, the Corbett family issued a public statement of thanks to the jury, the District Attorney's Office and the Davidson County Sheriff's Department.
    Jason's sister, Tracey Lynch, spoke as she was greeted by a bank of TV crews and photographers.
    Before they had even left the court building, the family were planning flights back home to the greater Limerick area.
    After four weeks in the searing heat of a North Carolina summer, the rain of Ireland was something everyone was looking forward to.
    Mrs Lynch, flanked by her sister Marilyn, said their family's priority now was providing a safe, happy and positive future for two children who lost both parents to tragedies before they were 10 years old.
    "We want to create a good future for Jason's two children who he loved so much," she said.
    Minutes earlier, Assistant District Attorney Alan Martin had summed up the mood of all who attended the gruelling trial which came to dominate headlines on both sides of the Atlantic.
    "There is no joy, there is no triumph, there is no pride. There is just grief, grief and more grief," he said.
    http://www.independent.ie/irish-news...-36024815.html

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,070
    Disgust at online campaign for killers

    A "disgusting" online fundraiser for Molly Martens-Corbett and her father has sparked a furious backlash.


    The pair were convicted on Wednesday of the second-degree murder of her husband, Irish businessman Jason Corbett.

    Davidson County Court heard that Martens-Corbett (33) and retired-FBI agent Thomas Martens (67) beat the Limerick man's head with a metal baseball bat and a brick at his Panther Creek home in 2015. His skull was so badly damaged the pathologist was unable to determine how many times he had been hit, but she said it was at least 12. The pair's legal team have already said they are planning to appeal the verdict.
    The fundraiser - set up by Martens-Corbett's aunt Mona Earnest - has a $300,000 (€253,000) target but has so far collected less than $10,000.


Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 ... LastLast


Similar Threads

  1. GUILTY NC - Jason Corbett, 39, murdered in his Wallburg home, 2 Aug 2015 #4
    By tlcya in forum Recently Sentenced and Beyond
    Replies: 985
    Last Post: 07-16-2017, 09:54 PM
  2. GUILTY NC - Jason Corbett, 39, murdered in his Wallburg home, 2 Aug 2015 #2
    By KateB in forum Recently Sentenced and Beyond
    Replies: 1251
    Last Post: 06-12-2017, 08:05 AM
  3. GUILTY NC - Jason Corbett, 39, murdered in his Wallburg home, 2 Aug 2015 #3
    By tlcya in forum Recently Sentenced and Beyond
    Replies: 999
    Last Post: 05-07-2016, 07:17 PM
  4. GUILTY NC - Jason Corbett, 39, murdered in his Wallburg home, 2 Aug 2015 #1
    By wildebeest in forum Recently Sentenced and Beyond
    Replies: 986
    Last Post: 02-21-2016, 04:18 PM
  5. ***MEDIA LINKS, DOCUMENTS, TIMELINES*** No Discussion***
    By fmd518 in forum Dr. Anthony Garcia
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 04-15-2014, 08:57 PM

Tags for this Thread