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  1. #1
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    Thumbs down Not all sex offenders require same treatment

    http://www.ajc.com/opinion/content/o...6edoffend.html
    Not all sex offenders require same treatment

    By JAMES STARK
    Published on: 10/26/05
    State Reps. Jerry Keen (R-St. Simons) and David Ralston (R-Blue Ridge) are showing interest in making Georgia's sex offender laws the toughest in the nation.

    There has been much national and local attention lately on the protection of children from violent predators in particular.

    I would plead with our legislators to base any proposed legislation on research in order to make it more effective and cost-efficient.

    Please be aware that under the rubric of "sex offenders" is a wide variety of people. Some reoffend, but very few. It is not true that all or even most sex offenders will reoffend. Bureau of Justice statistics found that 5.3 percent of sex offenders released from prison were rearrested for a new sex crime within three years. Karl Hanson and other researchers have found that 27 percent were charged or convicted of new sex offenses over the first 20 years after release. Treatment has been found to reduce that relapse by up to 40 percent.

    We need to distinguish dangerous sexual offenders from those who pose little risk to community safety. Treatment providers and probation officers assess newly released offenders to determine their risk levels. We can then provide different treatment and management strategies. That is far better than treating and managing all probationers the same. Aggressive notification could be reserved for the most dangerous of these. We need national and state models for registration and notification that take these levels into consideration. There simply is no evidence that community notification prevents sex crimes, reduces sex offense recidivism or increases community safety. Perhaps electronic monitoring could be considered for those at high risk levels.

    Recent high-profile cases do not represent the typical sex offender. Sexual abduction and murder are very rare. Most children who are molested (80-90 percent) are abused by family or acquaintances.

    I would urge our legislators not to require lifetime registration for juvenile offenders. Only 8 percent of those reoffend.

    We need to adopt a multitiered approach to aggressive notification and restrictions the more restrictive of those for people at the higher levels of risk.

    We are not a country of retribution. Together, we can protect our children and move their abusers toward true rehabilitation.

  2. #2
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    Mar 2005
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    Mountains, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by angelmom
    http://www.ajc.com/opinion/content/o...6edoffend.html
    Not all sex offenders require same treatment

    By JAMES STARK
    Published on: 10/26/05
    State Reps. Jerry Keen (R-St. Simons) and David Ralston (R-Blue Ridge) are showing interest in making Georgia's sex offender laws the toughest in the nation.

    There has been much national and local attention lately on the protection of children from violent predators in particular.

    I would plead with our legislators to base any proposed legislation on research in order to make it more effective and cost-efficient.

    Please be aware that under the rubric of "sex offenders" is a wide variety of people. Some reoffend, but very few. It is not true that all or even most sex offenders will reoffend. Bureau of Justice statistics found that 5.3 percent of sex offenders released from prison were rearrested for a new sex crime within three years. Karl Hanson and other researchers have found that 27 percent were charged or convicted of new sex offenses over the first 20 years after release. Treatment has been found to reduce that relapse by up to 40 percent.

    We need to distinguish dangerous sexual offenders from those who pose little risk to community safety. Treatment providers and probation officers assess newly released offenders to determine their risk levels. We can then provide different treatment and management strategies. That is far better than treating and managing all probationers the same. Aggressive notification could be reserved for the most dangerous of these. We need national and state models for registration and notification that take these levels into consideration. There simply is no evidence that community notification prevents sex crimes, reduces sex offense recidivism or increases community safety. Perhaps electronic monitoring could be considered for those at high risk levels.

    Recent high-profile cases do not represent the typical sex offender. Sexual abduction and murder are very rare. Most children who are molested (80-90 percent) are abused by family or acquaintances.

    I would urge our legislators not to require lifetime registration for juvenile offenders. Only 8 percent of those reoffend.

    We need to adopt a multitiered approach to aggressive notification and restrictions the more restrictive of those for people at the higher levels of risk.

    We are not a country of retribution. Together, we can protect our children and move their abusers toward true rehabilitation.
    Thanks for posting this.

    Sometimes, the person with a sex offender designation was an 17-18 year old having sex with 16 year old.

  3. #3
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    Aug 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by dakini
    Thanks for posting this.

    Sometimes, the person with a sex offender designation was an 17-18 year old having sex with 16 year old.

    True, and if a plea is made, it isn't always easy to determine the nature of the original crime. I guess my issue was that this article sounded like one of those people who defends sex offenders...it almost made me think of certain pedo blogs even. I don't know why, but it creeped me out in a subconscious way. I think if I ever met this man in person it would be interesting to see if he came off as genuinely concerned or a freak.

  4. #4
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    Jul 2004
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    Dana Point,CA
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    My girlfriend's daughter went off to college this year. Lovely, bright gal.

    She was at a party, had a few drinks and was walking home. She had to pee and went behind a bush. Whoops. Arrested and once convicted will be required to register as a sex offender.

  5. #5
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    Apr 2004
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    2,918
    Quote Originally Posted by JBean
    My girlfriend's daughter went off to college this year. Lovely, bright gal.

    She was at a party, had a few drinks and was walking home. She had to pee and went behind a bush. Whoops. Arrested and once convicted will be required to register as a sex offender.
    Ok, that's just not right.

    Please don't get me wrong. I believe sex offenders should be punished severely, but there are cases where (imo) they shouldn't be labled a sex offender.

    The son of a man I work with dated a 16 year old when he was 18. Completely consensual relationship. Her parents didn't like it and had him arrested for statutory rape. He is now on our local/state sex offender registry for everyone to see even though I don't think he committed a crime.

    I think circumstances should be taken into consideration before labeling someone a sex offender.

  6. #6
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    Jul 2004
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    Dana Point,CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewMom2003
    Ok, that's just not right.

    Please don't get me wrong. I believe sex offenders should be punished severely, but there are cases where (imo) they shouldn't be labled a sex offender.

    The son of a man I work with dated a 16 year old when he was 18. Completely consensual relationship. Her parents didn't like it and had him arrested for statutory rape. He is now on our local/state sex offender registry for everyone to see even though I don't think he committed a crime.

    I think circumstances should be taken into consideration before labeling someone a sex offender.
    They charged her with indecent exposure and honestly the whole thing makes me nuts.
    I do not condone bush urinating, and as the mother of 5 BOYS, I made it crystal clear that peeing on the spot was verboten, even when they were itty bitty.
    But to label this girl as a sex offender? Label her dumb, careless, drunk, stupid, but registered sex offender? Give me a break. It is not only a disservice to her but to the rest of us.
    I'm going to waste my time tracking people like her to keep out of my neighborhood? Spend dollars making sure her whereabouts are available? Makes me wonder who else they've got me afraid of.

  7. #7
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    Oct 2005
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    17
    Quote Originally Posted by JBean
    My girlfriend's daughter went off to college this year. Lovely, bright gal.

    She was at a party, had a few drinks and was walking home. She had to pee and went behind a bush. Whoops. Arrested and once convicted will be required to register as a sex offender.
    and this is just a sampling of how broad a spectrum sex offender covers you would be surprised for example remember that sexy girl friend you had at 16 you guys was at the beach and took lots of poleroid pictures some a bit revealing. being a cherished time in your life youve always kept those photo's letters ext.. well best not let le find them or you may just become a sex offender !
    food for thought and compasion < scary>

  8. #8
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    Feb 2005
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    What this makes me wonder is while tax dollars are being spent to list girls like the one Jbean described on a sex registery who is slipping through the cracks?

    Real sex offenders? IMO there is a far cry from a 17 and 16 YO dating and a Adult molesting a child or raping someone.

    How some teenage partygoer peeing on a bush equates with some dirtball rapist is beyond me. Is there some indication that if you pee on a bush at 2 am you will then molest a child?

    I don't think so.

    All this is going to do is make the registry meaningless.

  9. #9
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    Oct 2005
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    17
    i know one thing i wont pee in the bushes no more
    Last edited by daveknowshow2; 10-27-2005 at 06:53 PM.

  10. #10
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    I think reoffense rates, and whether this is child rape or consentual sex a few years too early need to be considered a lot more. We've gone from where child molestation wasn't such a big deal, sex crimes were more a shame to the victim than the criminal to a point where we are nearing a witchhunt for anyone regardless of their actual actions, actual harm.

    I think for a start, it needs to be separated out into violent sexual offenders - rapist, child molesters, etc. Let's figure out the ones who will reoffend, and get tough about them. Make sure the sentences reflect the harm done, not the arbitrary classification of 'sex offender'.


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amraann
    All this is going to do is make the registry meaningless.
    zackly

  12. #12
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    Aug 2005
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    To some degree the registry is already meaningless - those types of 'sex offender' crimes are already in the registries. When you see a registered sex offender near you, you need to check to see what it is, or else you'll be putting up posters of a drunk girl who took a leak in the bushes. Or the young guy who dated a slightly too young girl.

    I think the problem is that the crimes were categorized back when sex crimes were not taken very seriously. There needs to be at least two completely separate categories: Violent Sex Offenders (rapists, especially repeat rapists) and Child Sex Offenders (and this listing is only for the pedophiles, not for having consentual sex with a 16 year old girl). Then the rest of the 'sex offender' crimes should not need to be registered, or only slightly registered. And rank the offenders in every category by their dangerousness - how likely to re-offend, how dangerous to the community - and make the rankings easy to understand, easy to find.

    Right now it's hard to find out, the categories are so broad.

  13. #13
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    Nov 2003
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    There was a case spotlighted on CC a few months ago that haunts me. I think about it almost every day, I guess because I raised two boys and I know how teenagers can be.

    A group of teenage boys (16 and 17) were at a party when a girl, I believe she was 15, offered to give them all oral sex. The boys took her up on it. They were arrested and all but one took a plea deal of 5 years in prison. The other kid, an honor student and quarterback for the football team, decided to fight it in court. The girl admitted she'd done it willingly, said she was not drinking, and refused to appear as a witness against the boy. He was found guilty and sentenced to 10 years in prison. His mother was devastated, of course.

    I can't see what purpose, other than to ruin this young man's life, there is to him serving 10 years in prison. Adult child offenders often get less time. I haven't been able to find this story online and can't remember the kids name, but if anyone knows of it, please let me know. I'd like to write to his mother.

  14. #14
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    Aug 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mabel
    There was a case spotlighted on CC a few months ago that haunts me. I think about it almost every day, I guess because I raised two boys and I know how teenagers can be.

    A group of teenage boys (16 and 17) were at a party when a girl, I believe she was 15, offered to give them all oral sex. The boys took her up on it. They were arrested and all but one took a plea deal of 5 years in prison. The other kid, an honor student and quarterback for the football team, decided to fight it in court. The girl admitted she'd done it willingly, said she was not drinking, and refused to appear as a witness against the boy. He was found guilty and sentenced to 10 years in prison. His mother was devastated, of course.

    I can't see what purpose, other than to ruin this young man's life, there is to him serving 10 years in prison. Adult child offenders often get less time. I haven't been able to find this story online and can't remember the kids name, but if anyone knows of it, please let me know. I'd like to write to his mother.
    Adult rapists get less time! These sentences are all ridiculous - that wasn't worth 5 years in prison, it wasn't worth 1!

    It's the overreaction after so long of real sex crimes being ignored.

  15. #15
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    Feb 2005
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    Daveknows I would equate a child molestor in the same category as someone with child porn on their computer.

    I do not care if its indicitive of a offense later down the road.
    Some child was violated for the photos to be taken and the person who has them on their computer creates the market for that violation.

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