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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    Tybee Island,GA
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    CIA holds terror suspects in secret prisons

    This is a long 4 page article and below are a few excerps.



    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9890829/

    Debate grows within agency about legality, morality of approach
    MORE ON WASHINGTONPOST.COM

    Updated: 11:26 p.m. ET Nov. 1, 2005
    The CIA has been hiding and interrogating some of its most important al Qaeda captives at a Soviet-era compound in Eastern Europe, according to U.S. and foreign officials familiar with the arrangement.

    The secret facility is part of a covert prison system set up by the CIA nearly four years ago that at various times has included sites in eight countries, including Thailand, Afghanistan and several democracies in Eastern Europe, as well as a small center at the Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba, according to current and former intelligence officials and diplomats from three continents.

    .................................................. ..

    Growing concerns
    But the revelations of widespread prisoner abuse in Afghanistan and Iraq by the U.S. military -- which operates under published rules and transparent oversight of Congress -- have increased concern among lawmakers, foreign governments and human rights groups about the opaque CIA system. Those concerns escalated last month, when Vice President Cheney and CIA Director Porter J. Goss asked Congress to exempt CIA employees from legislation already endorsed by 90 senators that would bar cruel and degrading treatment of any prisoner in U.S. custody.

    Although the CIA will not acknowledge details of its system, intelligence officials defend the agency's approach, arguing that the successful defense of the country requires that the agency be empowered to hold and interrogate suspected terrorists for as long as necessary and without restrictions imposed by the U.S. legal system or even by the military tribunals established for prisoners held at Guantanamo Bay.

    ............................................

    It is illegal for the government to hold prisoners in such isolation in secret prisons in the United States, which is why the CIA placed them overseas, according to several former and current intelligence officials and other U.S. government officials. Legal experts and intelligence officials said that the CIA's internment practices also would be considered illegal under the laws of several host countries, where detainees have rights to have a lawyer or to mount a defense against allegations of wrongdoing.

    Host countries have signed the U.N. Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, as has the United States. Yet CIA interrogators in the overseas sites are permitted to use the CIA's approved "Enhanced Interrogation Techniques," some of which are prohibited by the U.N. convention and by U.S. military law. They include tactics such as "waterboarding," in which a prisoner is made to believe he or she is drowning.

    Some detainees apprehended by the CIA and transferred to foreign intelligence agencies have alleged after their release that they were tortured, although it is unclear whether CIA personnel played a role in the alleged abuse. Given the secrecy surrounding CIA detentions, such accusations have heightened concerns among foreign governments and human rights groups about CIA detention and interrogation practices
    ......................................

    The top 30 al Qaeda prisoners exist in complete isolation from the outside world. Kept in dark, sometimes underground cells, they have no recognized legal rights, and no one outside the CIA is allowed to talk with or even see them, or to otherwise verify their well-being, said current and former and U.S. and foreign government and intelligence officials.

    Most of the facilities were built and are maintained with congressionally appropriated funds, but the White House has refused to allow the CIA to brief anyone except the chairman and vice chairman of the House and Senate intelligence committees on the program's generalities.
    Welcome to the World Baby Caleb!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Mountains, CA
    Posts
    1,173
    Quote Originally Posted by tybee204
    This is a long 4 page article and below are a few excerps.



    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9890829/

    Debate grows within agency about legality, morality of approach
    MORE ON WASHINGTONPOST.COM

    Updated: 11:26 p.m. ET Nov. 1, 2005
    The CIA has been hiding and interrogating some of its most important al Qaeda captives at a Soviet-era compound in Eastern Europe, according to U.S. and foreign officials familiar with the arrangement.

    The secret facility is part of a covert prison system set up by the CIA nearly four years ago that at various times has included sites in eight countries, including Thailand, Afghanistan and several democracies in Eastern Europe, as well as a small center at the Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba, according to current and former intelligence officials and diplomats from three continents.

    .................................................. ..

    Growing concerns
    But the revelations of widespread prisoner abuse in Afghanistan and Iraq by the U.S. military -- which operates under published rules and transparent oversight of Congress -- have increased concern among lawmakers, foreign governments and human rights groups about the opaque CIA system. Those concerns escalated last month, when Vice President Cheney and CIA Director Porter J. Goss asked Congress to exempt CIA employees from legislation already endorsed by 90 senators that would bar cruel and degrading treatment of any prisoner in U.S. custody.

    Although the CIA will not acknowledge details of its system, intelligence officials defend the agency's approach, arguing that the successful defense of the country requires that the agency be empowered to hold and interrogate suspected terrorists for as long as necessary and without restrictions imposed by the U.S. legal system or even by the military tribunals established for prisoners held at Guantanamo Bay.

    ............................................

    It is illegal for the government to hold prisoners in such isolation in secret prisons in the United States, which is why the CIA placed them overseas, according to several former and current intelligence officials and other U.S. government officials. Legal experts and intelligence officials said that the CIA's internment practices also would be considered illegal under the laws of several host countries, where detainees have rights to have a lawyer or to mount a defense against allegations of wrongdoing.

    Host countries have signed the U.N. Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, as has the United States. Yet CIA interrogators in the overseas sites are permitted to use the CIA's approved "Enhanced Interrogation Techniques," some of which are prohibited by the U.N. convention and by U.S. military law. They include tactics such as "waterboarding," in which a prisoner is made to believe he or she is drowning.

    Some detainees apprehended by the CIA and transferred to foreign intelligence agencies have alleged after their release that they were tortured, although it is unclear whether CIA personnel played a role in the alleged abuse. Given the secrecy surrounding CIA detentions, such accusations have heightened concerns among foreign governments and human rights groups about CIA detention and interrogation practices
    ......................................

    The top 30 al Qaeda prisoners exist in complete isolation from the outside world. Kept in dark, sometimes underground cells, they have no recognized legal rights, and no one outside the CIA is allowed to talk with or even see them, or to otherwise verify their well-being, said current and former and U.S. and foreign government and intelligence officials.

    Most of the facilities were built and are maintained with congressionally appropriated funds, but the White House has refused to allow the CIA to brief anyone except the chairman and vice chairman of the House and Senate intelligence committees on the program's generalities.
    The ends do not justify the means. IMO

    Thanks Tybee.

    This is serious business. I am surprised no one is commenting on this. Where is congress?

    How can this go on?

    Goodbye to good will from the rest of the world's nations if we continue on this path.

  3. #3
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    Aug 2003
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    I dunno Dakini. Its pretty scary .
    Welcome to the World Baby Caleb!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Mountains, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by tybee204
    I dunno Dakini. Its pretty scary .
    Well you scooped this way ahead of google news.

    But I guess there is more interest in Camilla and the Prince. lol

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    892
    Quote Originally Posted by tybee204
    I dunno Dakini. Its pretty scary .
    It is pretty scary..........and very wrong. Former Pres. Jimmy Carter was talking about it on the Today show, yesterday. I guess that this administration thinks the Geneva Convention is a joke..........unless another country breaks the rules.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Mountains, CA
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    1,173
    Quote Originally Posted by jannuncutt
    It is pretty scary..........and very wrong. Former Pres. Jimmy Carter was talking about it on the Today show, yesterday. I guess that this administration thinks the Geneva Convention is a joke..........unless another country breaks the rules.
    EU promises inquiry into CIA's 'gulag'

    By Stephen Castle in Brussels

    Published: 04 November 2005


    http://news.independent.co.uk/europe/article324587.ece


    The Torture Test

    Yesterday, The Washington Post delivered fresh evidence that, within days of 9/11, Bush and Cheney told then-CIA director George Tenet to set CIA interrogators free from the customary restrictions. In her article yesterday on the mini-gulag system of secret CIA-operated prisons overseas, Post reporter Dana Priest reported that on September 17, 2001, Bush signed a secret “finding” giving the CIA broad authorization to disrupt terrorist activity, including permission to kill, capture and detain Al Qaeda members anywhere in the world.

    Authorization for “rendering” detainees to other countries for interrogation, as well as the establishment of secret prisons abroad, were probably subsumed under such a broad presidential “finding.” Still, one can assume that Tenet and, indeed, the president himself would seek reassurance that they would be legally protected from prosecution in the future. And this would account for the flurry of lawyerly activity in early 2002.



    Ray McGovern

    November 03, 2005

    http://www.tompaine.com/articles/200...rture_test.php





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