1439 users online (292 members and 1147 guests)  


Websleuths News


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 16 to 29 of 29
  1. #16
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    9,127
    I missed the last few episodes but taped them so I need to catch up and watch them from my DVR.

    Here are some observations from some of the others i did see.

    ---What is amazingly sad to me is when this organization (cult) talks about people's "crimes" against their organization there really is nothing the person did. Absolutely nothing of any seriousness. And yet they put them in punishments that make it seem the person committed a serious crime or something. Its insane.

    There is talk of putting people in the solitary confinement type buildings like where his wife is and I am thinking what the heck did they do? They didnt even do anything much wrong. Maybe just disagreed with something but nothing serious to warrant that punishment.

    Its a true sign of serious brainwashing since the people must think they really did crimes against the organization. Normal folks would say "this is not right" and get out as fast as they could.

    ---Another sign of some serious brainwashing. When you saw some of the episodes of the scientology people harrassing other people they do it with such evilness and meanness. You can sense they are filled with rage against outside folks that disagree with them. That is not normal.

    Most people who disagree with someone would just kindly ignore the other persons views but this group gets violent and mean against people who disagree with them. That is a true sign of some serious brainwashing.

    They cant be wrong in their minds or their whole existence is for nothing.

    ---I didnt realize there is a lifetime contract and the organization tries to force people to stay with the threat of owing the money for the classes. WTH Its a way of controlling the people to force them to stay in the group. Give it free at first but then you cant leave unless you had tons of money that most do not have. That is so messed up.

    This is no church by any stretch of the definition.

    ---Their books and classes that they force their members to take give them nothing of value in the real world if a member wants to leave.

    Its not like they can list anything on a resume that they graduated with a college degree or anything. Their teachings are their own and are not recognized by companies so its useless all that training to members that want to leave the group.

    They must feel so helpless and feel forced to stay since they have no real skills or training that can help them get a job on the outside world.

    Its another form of control the group uses on its members.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    Posts
    354
    I've been watching youtube and reading a lot of blogs about people who have escaped scientology. When I watched the tom cruise video where he won the 'blah, blah' medal, I was so disgusted. He totally made no sense. They all talk about the good they are doing for the planet, but they never explain exactly how they are helping anyone. Tom cruise got all these accolades because he talked to billions of people about scientology????

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    9,604
    Tom Cruise gets accolades because he gives Million$ to the cult, and like any generous and famous benefactor, he gets showered with attention and acclaim. He's their prize calf and they intend to keep him well controlled and in the fold. He doesn't see the treatment that happens to others, most of these celebs don't see it because they are coddled.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    126
    Quote Originally Posted by AlwaysShocked View Post
    One thing I am noticing that I did not know before is that it seems a lot of these stories include a woman on her own with children to support. And I believe this was the case for Leah Remini's mother also.

    So this "church" was supplying these (likely uneducated and incapable of self-support) single mothers with a job, a place to live, and free babysitting services for their children. It is easy enough to see the appeal.
    Like lots of cults, they prey on vulnerable people. Young people who are naive, people who are having a hard time with a career or their personal lives, single parents that are struggling. If your life is going the exact way you want it to, you are just not going to go looking for answers Scientology says they provide.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    On the sunny shores of I-65
    Posts
    1,820
    I cannot tell you how much I admire and respect Leah Remini for doing this. She knows the risks- and does it anyway. Kudos.
    Six-year-old Shannon Sherrill disappeared from her front yard in Thorntown, Indiana in October, 1986. Someone knows where she is......

    http://www.websleuths.com/forums/sho...annon+sherrill

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Palm Springs
    Posts
    19,117
    Quote Originally Posted by Madeleine74 View Post
    Tom Cruise gets accolades because he gives Million$ to the cult, and like any generous and famous benefactor, he gets showered with attention and acclaim. He's their prize calf and they intend to keep him well controlled and in the fold. He doesn't see the treatment that happens to others, most of these celebs don't see it because they are coddled.
    You may be right that Tom doesn't know, but somebody on one of the episodes said he has to know that the people who clean his house, detail his cars, etc., are all working for less than minimum wage. Obviously, I don't know the man. But it wouldn't surprise me if he justifies the discrepancy by reasoning that the servitude is helping the others "grow".

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Palm Springs
    Posts
    19,117
    Quote Originally Posted by buggiegirl View Post
    Like lots of cults, they prey on vulnerable people. Young people who are naive, people who are having a hard time with a career or their personal lives, single parents that are struggling. If your life is going the exact way you want it to, you are just not going to go looking for answers Scientology says they provide.
    True, but couldn't we say that of every religion? I've never heard a Born Again Christian testify that he or she was anything but lost when s/he suddenly "found" Christ.

    And haven't we heard almost every interviewee say the initial courses and readings WERE helpful to them? (Who knows why? Maybe they just needed somebody to talk to.)

    It's the later, full-time immersion and living under the thumb of COB Miscavige that is so abusive.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    1,012
    What I find astonishing is the fact that members are well aware that families are broken up when members leave.

    The members who stay are forbidden any contact with their loved ones who have left.

    Yet they stay. I cannot understand this.

    Is the force to stay within this cult greater than abandoning family members? I can't fathom this.

    If so, and it sure seems to be the case, then 1) it definitely is a cult 2) there is brainwashing

    I can sort of see members abandoning family members if they were all living in a commune away from society. But these people are living every day lives. How can they not see what they are doing?

    I join in praising Leah Remini for all she is doing. Hopefully more members will leave. At least there is public discourse
    concerning Scientology and that is something they must hate.

    Bring it on Leah!
    "In separateness lies the world’s greatest misery; in compassion lies the world’s true strength."

    - Buddha

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    9,604
    Cult members are brainwashed over a long time. They live in fear of disobeying. The pressure to disconnect is one of their foundational tenants and anyone leaving is considered among the worst of the worst.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Palm Springs
    Posts
    19,117
    Quote Originally Posted by Madeleine74 View Post
    Cult members are brainwashed over a long time. They live in fear of disobeying. The pressure to disconnect is one of their foundational tenants and anyone leaving is considered among the worst of the worst.
    I think we should be careful with the "b" word. Psychologists apply it sparingly to people like POWs. The Sea Org elite in "the Hole" in Hemet may well become brainwashed by that experience, but I doubt the word means much if applied to the rank-and-file. Most organizations exert strong social pressures on their members to conform. And most people who radically change their world views--not only the religious, but people who stay in a job or a marriage for too long--look back and say, "What was I thinking? I must have been brainwashed!"

    But that's a popular use of the word and doesn't really describe any specific technique.


  11. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Palm Springs
    Posts
    19,117
    Quote Originally Posted by zencompass View Post
    What I find astonishing is the fact that members are well aware that families are broken up when members leave.

    The members who stay are forbidden any contact with their loved ones who have left.

    Yet they stay. I cannot understand this.

    Is the force to stay within this cult greater than abandoning family members? I can't fathom this.

    If so, and it sure seems to be the case, then 1) it definitely is a cult 2) there is brainwashing

    I can sort of see members abandoning family members if they were all living in a commune away from society. But these people are living every day lives. How can they not see what they are doing?

    I join in praising Leah Remini for all she is doing. Hopefully more members will leave. At least there is public discourse
    concerning Scientology and that is something they must hate.

    Bring it on Leah!
    I agree with you on the whole. But imagine an authoritarian organization that controls every aspect of its lower-ranking members' behavior, schedule and hygiene; that metes out severe penalties for speaking out against official policy; that has its own police force to ensure members' compliance with rules and regulations; that sends people to retrieve anyone who tries to escape; that sends its members abroad for months, even years, at a time, forcing long absences from the member's spouse and children; and for all these restrictions pays less than minimum wage.

    Would you say that organization's members had been brainwashed?

    Or would you call them patriotic members of the U.S. military?

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    34,236


    I see what you did there Nova. But there are also some very key differences. Some of the more notable ones are the military does not accept minors, does not require recruits sign billion year contracts, does not demand repayment for funds spent training them, and does not require that they disassociate themselves with their non patriotic family members.

    All of which is really off topic because the topic of this forum is the organization of Scientology and not the military.

    But thank you for getting the grey matter firing.
    Websleuths now on Facebook

    Welcome to all new members. Thank you for joining the conversation. Please take a moment to become familiar with the TOS and rules, etiquette and information.

    mni wiconi - Lakota for Water is Life.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    126
    Quote Originally Posted by Nova View Post
    True, but couldn't we say that of every religion? I've never heard a Born Again Christian testify that he or she was anything but lost when s/he suddenly "found" Christ.

    And haven't we heard almost every interviewee say the initial courses and readings WERE helpful to them? (Who knows why? Maybe they just needed somebody to talk to.)

    It's the later, full-time immersion and living under the thumb of COB Miscavige that is so abusive.
    I am an atheist and I am not a fan of any organized religion, but there is a massive difference between Scientology and growing up Catholic like I did. I decided I didn't believe any of that god stuff, and slowly left, told my parents as gently as I could that I was not a believer and never would be, and absolutely no one cared at all. My parents were sad for a bit but got over it and basically left the church as well (they could not handle the pedophile scandals or the church sticking its nose into politics), and the Catholic church sure as heck never hunted me down or cared that I left, didn't believe, was vocal about being a nonbeliever etc. And on top of all that, for a few years after I decided I didn't believe, I still went to Christmas Eve mass with my parents because they appreciated me being there and I like the music and decorations, so whatever. I wasn't approached to come back, I wasn't shunned at the door. Noooone of that would happen with Scientology, so there is a HUGE difference.

    But I do completely agree that a lot of people who are lost find religion because they are looking for answers. One reason I find I don't need religion or god is because I don't care about the answers. Death doesn't bother me, I don't wonder "what comes next" and I am cool with the science explanations for why we are here, where we came from, etc.

    They do say that low level Scientologists can quietly leave and not deal with being stalked or forced to disconnect, and that those things are generally reserved for Sea Org members. But even the low level Scientologists are forced to do Scient. work every single day, for hours a day. As a Catholic growing up, I went to church Sunday mornings for 1 hour, and CCD before church for 1 hour. That was the entirety of my required participation. And IMO, that was my parents requiring it, not the church. I could have gone to mass every week and not done the whole CCD thing and no one would have known.
    Last edited by buggiegirl; Yesterday at 10:38 PM.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Palm Springs
    Posts
    19,117
    My point wasn't to indict either the Catholic Church or the U.S. military. But if we're honest, we should admit that we judge these authoritarian organizations at least in part based on how we feel about their ultimate purpose.

    If we thought Scientology were defending us from ISIS, we'd probably overlook a few tantrums from DM.

    (ticya, there are plenty of examples of military recruiters looking the other way so that 16 and 17-year-olds can enlist without parental consent. bubblegirl, good for your parents! But one friend of mine found her Catholic parents stopped speaking to her because she married outside the faith. And we all know of ways in which the church has protected the institution over the welfare of its congregation. But even a pacifist such as myself accepts that the military and the Church do some good and are basically well intentioned. We just can't see any "good" that comes from the Co$, perhaps because there isn't any.)

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2


Similar Threads

  1. S1 Ep 5 Golden Era - A&E Leah Remini - Scientology and the Aftermath
    By tlcya in forum Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 01-06-2017, 03:57 PM
  2. S1 Ep 3 The Bridge - A&E Leah Remini - Scientology and the Aftermath
    By tlcya in forum Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-19-2016, 12:45 AM
  3. S1 Ep 2 Fair Game - A&E Leah Remini - Scientology and the Aftermath
    By tlcya in forum Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-18-2016, 04:27 PM
  4. S1 Ep 1 Disconnect - A&E Leah Remini - Scientology and the Aftermath
    By tlcya in forum Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-18-2016, 04:24 PM
  5. The Rules: Leah Remini - Scientology and the Aftermath
    By tlcya in forum Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-18-2016, 04:14 PM

Tags for this Thread