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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Changes in Mexican Extradition laws can affect US fugitives

    Mexico's Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that suspects facing life in prison can be extradited, overturning a 4-year-old ban that had prevented many of the country's most notorious criminals from being sent to the United States.

    A 1978 treaty with the United States allows Mexico to deny extradition if a person faces the death penalty _ a restriction that still stands under Tuesday's ruling. But the ruling overturns a 2001 the Supreme Court decision that blocked extradition of suspects facing life in prison without the possibility of parole.

    Capital punishment has been banned by Mexico's constitution since June and was only rarely applied for decades before that. Life sentences are also rare.

    The high court took up the issue after the government of the northern state of Chihuahua modified its penal code to include life sentences in convictions involving homicide and kidnapping.

    Tuesday's ruling also declared Chihuahua's state law constitutional, setting a precedent that could allow for more life sentences.

    Judges ruled 6-5 to throw out the life without parole restriction, but their ruling will not ease extradition restrictions for suspects who could face the death penalty, a court spokesman said.

    He said the ruling will apply to all suspects captured in Mexico _ including U.S. citizens who commit crimes, then flee south of the border.
    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/...8E6GN2O0.shtml
    Just when I think that I have seen the most depraved things a human can do to another human, somebody posts a new story...........

    Why is it that when a custodial parent fails to provide for a child it is called neglect and is a criminal matter. But when a non custodial parent fails to provide it is called failure to support and is a civil matter?


    "Just when the caterpillar thought its world was over, it became a butterfly" ~ Michelle Knight

  2. #2
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    Jul 2004
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    at home
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    How does that old saying go??? Closing the Barn Door after the horses have all escaped. The illegals, probably including a goodly number of terrorists, are already in this country. This is to lock them in??

    Johnny, the nine year old, who flunked out of kindergarten this year, could have told us that much.

    What great ideas will George think of next???

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    23,796
    Buzz, my understanding of the article was that Mexico didn't extradite fugitives from our country if they would be coming back to face the DP or LWOP in our country. Even if they were US citizens.
    The change in the law means that people who commit crimes in our country, and run to Mexico can be extradited unless they are facing the DP now. They have been extraditing more and more of our fugitives lately, but this kind of formalizes things.
    An example of the impact of this, Perry March is being tried on 2nd degree murder charges, because that is what the DA had to agree to, in order to get Mexico to agree to his extradition back to the states. 1st degree charges would have meant that he would be facing a possible DP or LWOP sentence, and under those conditions Mexico would not allow the extradition.
    Just when I think that I have seen the most depraved things a human can do to another human, somebody posts a new story...........

    Why is it that when a custodial parent fails to provide for a child it is called neglect and is a criminal matter. But when a non custodial parent fails to provide it is called failure to support and is a civil matter?


    "Just when the caterpillar thought its world was over, it became a butterfly" ~ Michelle Knight

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    30,906
    Quote Originally Posted by mysteriew
    Mexico's Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that suspects facing life in prison can be extradited, overturning a 4-year-old ban that had prevented many of the country's most notorious criminals from being sent to the United States.

    A 1978 treaty with the United States allows Mexico to deny extradition if a person faces the death penalty _ a restriction that still stands under Tuesday's ruling. But the ruling overturns a 2001 the Supreme Court decision that blocked extradition of suspects facing life in prison without the possibility of parole.

    Capital punishment has been banned by Mexico's constitution since June and was only rarely applied for decades before that. Life sentences are also rare.

    The high court took up the issue after the government of the northern state of Chihuahua modified its penal code to include life sentences in convictions involving homicide and kidnapping.

    Tuesday's ruling also declared Chihuahua's state law constitutional, setting a precedent that could allow for more life sentences.

    Judges ruled 6-5 to throw out the life without parole restriction, but their ruling will not ease extradition restrictions for suspects who could face the death penalty, a court spokesman said.

    He said the ruling will apply to all suspects captured in Mexico _ including U.S. citizens who commit crimes, then flee south of the border.
    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/...8E6GN2O0.shtml
    About time!



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