742 users online (69 members and 673 guests)  


Websleuths News


Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 37
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    In heels
    Posts
    27,885

    AR - Shirley Chittum, 71, dies of extreme neglect, Bentonville, 3 Dec 2005

    Shirley Chittum died Saturday night, one day after she was rushed to a hospital and her son was arrested because authorities say he neglected her.

    The 71-year-old homebound woman was found early Friday on her sofa in a Bentonville apartment, withered to 62 pounds and covered with feces, urine, thousands of maggots and flies.

    Police and medical workers cried and vomited while trying to help the woman, and an emergency room doctor called her condition the worst case "of neglect he had ever seen," according to a probable-cause affidavit.

    Paul Arthur Chittum, 44, is being held in the Benton County Jail on a $100,000 bond. He is accused of felony neglect of an adult.

    An autopsy was performed Monday, and Prosecutor Robin Green said murder charges could be forthcoming depending on results of the autopsy and the Bentonville Police Department's ongoing investigation.

    According to court documents, Paul Chittum called an ambulance after midnight Friday because his mother refused to eat. Her speech was slurred and he was afraid she had a stroke, he later told police.

    When paramedics arrived they found the woman on a sofa, covered in blankets. When they began unwrapping her, hundreds of flies were released. They couldn't detach her from the sofa cushions, so they wrapped them up with her for transport.

    Wounds on her backside and legs were filled with maggots and were life-threatening, doctors said. Her condition Friday, while in intensive care, was called "grave."

    When Paul Chittum first sat down with police on Friday, he claimed he arrived just two weeks before from Missouri to help his mother. By the end of the interview, he admitted moving in one year ago.

    "I love my mom, I would never hurt her, I did what my mom wanted me to do," he said at first to an officer, through tears. But as Bentonville Police Officer Joseph Falcon challenged him, Paul Chittum admitted he hadn't changed her adult diaper in weeks, and that he'd seen maggots and flies on the couch and urine and feces seeping down from his mother onto the floor.

    His mother told him not to help her, he said. "I am responsible, totally responsible," he said, according to the affidavit. "I am going to speak flat with you, give me a gun so I can shoot myself ... I tried to tell her I would get into trouble over this, but she would not believe me."

    http://www.nwaonline.net/articles/20...1bzchittum.txt

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    30,906
    That is heartbreaking. I do belive him, I had a neighbor once who fell and broke her leg, she made her adult son swear he wouldn't call for an ambulance. She was terrified of hospitals and doctors. He didn't and as a result she was bed ridden for years.

  3. #3
    SewingDeb's Avatar
    SewingDeb is offline "Sorry, I'm not qualified to land the plane."
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    8,957
    How could he not clean her up? Why didn't DHS do something. What about the people from meals on wheels? This is disgraceful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    30,906
    Oh I agree. It's disgusting and horrible!

    There comes a time when a person needs to grow up and do the right thing, no matter what mommy says!

  5. #5
    SewingDeb's Avatar
    SewingDeb is offline "Sorry, I'm not qualified to land the plane."
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    8,957
    Quote Originally Posted by Linda7NJ
    Oh I agree. It's disgusting and horrible!

    There comes a time when a person needs to grow up and do the right thing, no matter what mommy says!
    Exactly. Sometimes you just have to take over, even if it is your own parent.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    In heels
    Posts
    27,885
    but what a way to end your days, she was practically part of the sofa, they couldn't remove her from the cushions, to live in all that filth and degrading conditions not fit for animals.. animals live better than this poor lady did. She needed help and respect - she was not even that old, only 71.

    The whole thing makes me sick

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,231
    I'm sorry, but there's just not an excuse for this. I took care of my Mom for a long time before she died. There were many, many times she did not want me to do something, and my answer was always the same, "Sorry, Mom, but this has to be done." Even if he didn't feel comfortable taking care of her himself, all he had to do was call for help. Most communities have resources for elderly homebound folks -- they help with baths, etc. There's just no excuse for this poor woman to be found in the shape she was in. I'm sorry to rant, but this just really gets to me.
    You put the light in me...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    NW Arkansas - Native Texan
    Posts
    1,498
    This is 20 minutes away from me.

    I felt physically sick when I heard about it.

  9. #9
    2luvmy's Avatar
    2luvmy is offline RIP Ragdoll. You don't get to choose how you're going to die, or when. You can only decide how you're going to live now.
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    1,219
    This "man" is an idiot.

    My grandfather had Alzheimers and my mother and stepfather took care of him at their home. I came down to help out when time allowed.

    He crapped all over the furniture, walked around naked, they gave him baths, made sure he was fed and had clean clothes. Entertained him and put up with his delusions and loved him. He even tried to chase and bite my own children and I had to break that up.

    My mom cried everytime she bathed him or had to reprimand him for crossing the line. My mom and dad were so heart broken to see him needing that level of care. He fought her several times and each time she did what was necessary to ensure he was taken care of. When he became too combative and started doing things my folks could no longer handle, they sought outside care. It broke their hearts, but they knew they neded help.

    People who hurt kids and our elderly need to beaten about the head!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    892
    I just don't believe him.......unless he is retarded.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    N.Y.C
    Posts
    237
    he should get the same thing done to him .his excuses are a huge steaming pile of bs..

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    2,173
    I'd like to know about the family's past. What society calls elder abuse in some cases might be considered in the adult child's view as payback.I suspect as the baby boomers get older we'll see more and more elder abuse cases in the news, simply because of the numbers involved.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    30,906
    Quote Originally Posted by BillyGoatGruff
    I'd like to know about the family's past. What society calls elder abuse in some cases might be considered in the adult child's view as payback.I suspect as the baby boomers get older we'll see more and more elder abuse cases in the news, simply because of the numbers involved.
    Nursing homes are going to be over flowing. It will be so easy for the grown adult kids to dump their parents in a home. But remember .....these will be many of the parents that dumped their own babies into daycare at 6 weeks of age and never looked back.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Middle Georgia
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by Linda7NJ
    Nursing homes are going to be over flowing. It will be so easy for the grown adult kids to dump their parents in a home. But remember .....these will be many of the parents that dumped their own babies into daycare at 6 weeks of age and never looked back.

    Linda,
    I am a daycare parent and do not feel that I am a bad parent as a result. This statement is offensive to me as not everyone in today's society can afford to have a parent in the home at all times. Not only that, some parents who could afford to stay home find their work rewarding. I have never known of a child in a quality daycare setting to be unstable. I have however known of children who are socially terrified when they go to kindergarten due to lack of socialization with other children. My son is in an excellent facility that focuses on academics as well as Christianity. He is more advanced socially and academically then several children we know. My son was never "dumped" into daycare, my husband and I did extensive research on facilities and checked state records on each place we considered. I do not criticize parents who choose to stay in the home and the same respect for working parents would be kindly appreciated. To express the thought that daycares are all bad places is in my opinion narrow minded. I don't believe my son feels neglected or unloved, in fact he adores his teacher and looks forward to seeing his friends each day. Sorry to ramble, this just really strikes a nerve with me.
    All posts are just my opinion...and can change in an instant
    GaGirl

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    2,173
    Quote Originally Posted by GaGirl
    Linda,
    I am a daycare parent and do not feel that I am a bad parent as a result. This statement is offensive to me as not everyone in today's society can afford to have a parent in the home at all times. Not only that, some parents who could afford to stay home find their work rewarding. I have never known of a child in a quality daycare setting to be unstable. I have however known of children who are socially terrified when they go to kindergarten due to lack of socialization with other children. My son is in an excellent facility that focuses on academics as well as Christianity. He is more advanced socially and academically then several children we know. My son was never "dumped" into daycare, my husband and I did extensive research on facilities and checked state records on each place we considered. I do not criticize parents who choose to stay in the home and the same respect for working parents would be kindly appreciated. To express the thought that daycares are all bad places is in my opinion narrow minded. I don't believe my son feels neglected or unloved, in fact he adores his teacher and looks forward to seeing his friends each day. Sorry to ramble, this just really strikes a nerve with me.
    Daycare is a touchy issue, and not a new one. However, in the olden days beyond the 1950s (I'm talking before the WWII) most women didn't stay home with their children. They couldn't. They either took the kids out into the fields or factories with them, or placed them in creches--group daycare, often maintained by elderly women and young girls. Of course, this is where teh concept of swaddling infants comes from--wrapping them up tightly so they can't crawl into open fireplaces or machinery. The outlawing of child labor made childcare another problem for working women. So in reality the concept of the stay at home mother is comparatively new (less than 75 years) and largely dependent on social status/economics.
    That said, my mother worked as a professional daycare provider for several years, and will testify that there are two types of daycare parents: the ones that will pick their kids up on the dot, make sure the child arrives dressed properly & is clean and fed upon arrival, and those who will effectively drop their kid off at daycare in little more than t-shirt and a diaper, reeking of poop, and not pick them up until they're threatened with a call to social services for abandonment.
    The worst case scenario was when my mother changed a 2 year old's diaper and found bite marks on the child's buttocks and genitals that appeared to be from an adult or older child.
    Many of these children suffered attachment disorders and had to be taken out of daycare because they were acting out on the children around them. Stuff like this does not go away, although it is usually society in general, not the parents in particular, who suffer at the hands of these hapless kids once they reach adulthood.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast


Similar Threads

  1. GUILTY MO - Darren Kimbrough, 35, disabled, dies of extreme neglect, St Louis, 17 July 2005
    By Old Broad in forum Recently Sentenced and Beyond
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-24-2016, 09:16 AM
  2. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-10-2010, 04:09 PM
  3. GUILTY NV - Adacelli Snyder, 2, disabled, dies of extreme neglect, Las Vegas, 29 June 2005
    By mysteriew in forum Recently Sentenced and Beyond
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 05-20-2010, 06:17 AM
  4. GUILTY IL - Benjamin Sargent, 5 mos, dies of extreme neglect, Peoria, 12 Feb 2008
    By imthemom in forum Recently Sentenced and Beyond
    Replies: 204
    Last Post: 01-18-2010, 01:12 AM
  5. GUILTY PA - Jade Leonard, 14 mos, dies of extreme neglect, Girardville, 29 Sept 2005
    By Taximom in forum Recently Sentenced and Beyond
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-22-2008, 11:50 AM

Tags for this Thread