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  1. #1
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    2017.05.08 - Married Couples Splitting Over Trump

    Married Couples Splitting Over Trump, Study Says

    New data from Wakefield Research, an Arlington, Virginia-based polling firm, one in 10 couples (married or unmarried) ended their relationships over political disagreements, with millennials parting ways at a particularly high rate of 22%.

    snip

    "In my 35 years of matrimonial practice, I have never seen so many couples split over a political disagreement as with the Trump election. The essence is: you must agree with me. Since I specialize in the psychology of divorce, this essence has its roots in narcissism, antisocial personality disorder and even obsessive compulsive disorder. I am frequently mediating these disputes between couples to help them draft a postnuptial or separation agreement,” Brenner tells FOX Business.

    Fights over Trump drive couples, especially millennials, to split up

    Couples are fighting over President Trump more than ever, and many are turning to divorce court to get out of their politically ravaged marriages.

    New data from Wakefield Research found that one in 10 couples, married and not, have ended their relationships in a battle over political differences. For younger millennials, it's 22 percent.

    snip

    "Passionately opposing points of views are not only driving wedges between strangers and even friends, but we are now seeing evidence that this dissent is having a detrimental impact on Americans' marriages and relationships," the report said.

    In fact, 24 percent of Americans in a relationship or married and 42 percent of millennials told the survey that "since President Trump was elected, they and their partner have disagreed or argued about politics more than ever."

    Two unrelated online dating reports confirmed the rise of political incompatibility. They showed that Democrats are especially unlikely to date a Trump-supporting Republican, but Republicans are more inclined to give Clinton-supporting Democrats a try.

  2. #2
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    I saw this the other day and it broke my heart. I don't know what to think anymore.

    Jesus wept.

  3. #3
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    People need to remember "this too shall pass".
    Keep things in perspective for crying out loud.
    Sheesh!
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    "Look, if any of us wanted to mind our own business, we wouldn't be here" (carbuff 8/11/13)

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  4. #4
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    It's not a political disagreement. It's not Carville and Matalin. It's not simply about more money should be spent on schools and roads than on defense. It's about your human values. It's about priorities and how you believe people should be treated. I don't understand how couples courted and married without learning such basic facts, unless somewhere along the way one of them made a hard turn in an unexpected direction.

    I lost a friend during the election - I have many friends from various parties in two countries - but it was because what was revealed to me about her during the campaign. I can deal with a conservative friend or a Republican brother, but it was what I learned about her heart that ended our friendship. Twenty years and it took Trump's campaign for me to know that part of her.

  5. #5
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    I think that if my spouse supported Trump, I would realize my marriage was on less than solid ground.

    I can get through visits with family where I am "jokingly" roasted for being the token lib. I csn ignore Obama toilet paper.

    But if my husband....my life partner...held in esteem a man of whom my opinion is slightly worse than disgust....I can not be flippant. I would sincerely second-guessing my choice in marriage.

    Not saying it would not work, but the huge chasm that now exists is concerning to families and our communities as a whole.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesneakers View Post
    It's not a political disagreement. It's not Carville and Matalin. It's not simply about more money should be spent on schools and roads than on defense. It's about your human values. It's about priorities and how you believe people should be treated. I don't understand how couples courted and married without learning such basic facts, unless somewhere along the way one of them made a hard turn in an unexpected direction.

    I lost a friend during the election - I have many friends from various parties in two countries - but it was because what was revealed to me about her during the campaign. I can deal with a conservative friend or a Republican brother, but it was what I learned about her heart that ended our friendship. Twenty years and it took Trump's campaign for me to know that part of her.
    I agree 100%. My Mom was a Dem and Dad is a Repub. Growing up, we had many civil and balanced political discussions around the dinner table. I don't remember any volatility at all. Funny though, all of us kids are Dems.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesneakers View Post
    It's not a political disagreement. It's not Carville and Matalin. It's not simply about more money should be spent on schools and roads than on defense. It's about your human values. It's about priorities and how you believe people should be treated. I don't understand how couples courted and married without learning such basic facts, unless somewhere along the way one of them made a hard turn in an unexpected direction.

    I lost a friend during the election - I have many friends from various parties in two countries - but it was because what was revealed to me about her during the campaign. I can deal with a conservative friend or a Republican brother, but it was what I learned about her heart that ended our friendship. Twenty years and it took Trump's campaign for me to know that part of her.
    I lost a long term friend, too. He called me an idiot for even voting. He said everyone knew that Hillary had already paid for her win and only "retards" couldn't see that Trump stood zero chance against the Clinton corruption. Hillary paid for an EC win.

    First strike: using the word "retards". Seriously, dude? 2017?

    Second strike: not voting, but *****ing and moaning about how unfair it was that Hillary cheated and won.

    Third strike: Hilary lost the EC. So obviously that "totes amazeballs" intel was....wrong.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesneakers View Post
    It's not a political disagreement. It's not Carville and Matalin. It's not simply about more money should be spent on schools and roads than on defense. It's about your human values. It's about priorities and how you believe people should be treated. I don't understand how couples courted and married without learning such basic facts, unless somewhere along the way one of them made a hard turn in an unexpected direction.

    I lost a friend during the election - I have many friends from various parties in two countries - but it was because what was revealed to me about her during the campaign. I can deal with a conservative friend or a Republican brother, but it was what I learned about her heart that ended our friendship. Twenty years and it took Trump's campaign for me to know that part of her.
    I hear you, blue & you make good points.
    But where I go to is this:

    First, The media & press adore (and economically rely) on getting everyone riled up into a frenzy. It's good for ratings. So the media messages become pervasive & right there in front of us 24/7. I think we have to be mindful of the sensationalism, propaganda, & media intrusiveness or lest we may become hysterical or brainwashed. It's easy to get caught up in it.

    Second, any of our political opinions will barely (or not at all) influence what goes on in Washington.

    So enjoy life and be happy & grateful everyday. Balance.
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    "Look, if any of us wanted to mind our own business, we wouldn't be here" (carbuff 8/11/13)

    This post reflects my constitutionally-protected opinion. Please do not copy it anywhere else outside of the WebSleuth forum

  9. #9
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    I think in the case of younger people they may not have known themselves where they stood on certain issues until this election.

    I guess to me if feelings about this presidency can destroy solemn vows made between lovers and partners, what hope is there for the United States of America?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fairy1 View Post
    I agree 100%. My Mom was a Dem and Dad is a Repub. Growing up, we had many civil and balanced political discussions around the dinner table. I don't remember any volatility at all. Funny though, all of us kids are Dems.
    I have a friend, a Republican who is also married to a Republican. My friend and I can talk and have great, animated, enlightening, and even heated conversations. But I can't have similar conversations with her spouse. One example is healthcare: My friend thinks it's too expensive and its unrealistic for the USA to start a universal healthcare plan. Too many people, too many changes to be made, etc. But she's open to it, because if there's a way everyone could get coverage that would be great. Her spouse? No universal health care because no one should get free health care. If you get cancer it's up to you to pay for it. If you can't? Too bad. Yet they're both Republicans.

    So anyway, I can see the Trump divorce factor. Sometimes it's about more than politics.


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tillicum View Post
    I think in the case of younger people they may not have known themselves where they stood on certain issues until this election.

    I guess to me if feelings about this presidency can destroy solemn vows made between lovers and partners, what hope is there for the United States of America?
    That's a good point. Sometimes I forgot how clueless I was the first time I voted. We're still only learning about ourselves.

    Don't be too sad because honestly, look at how easily marriages break up. Is it destroying the vows, or should they not have been made in the first place?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesneakers View Post
    I have a friend, a Republican who is also married to a Republican. My friend and I can talk and have great, animated, enlightening, and even heated conversations. But I can't have similar conversations with her spouse. One example is healthcare: My friend thinks it's too expensive and its unrealistic for the USA to start a universal healthcare plan. Too many people, too many changes to be made, etc. But she's open to it, because if there's a way everyone could get coverage that would be great. Her spouse? No universal health care because no one should get free health care. If you get cancer it's up to you to pay for it. If you can't? Too bad. Yet they're both Republicans.

    So anyway, I can see the Trump divorce factor. Sometimes it's about more than politics.
    So true. I think both major parties need to do some serious soul-searching to really figure out how TF Donald Trump wound up in the White House. There seem to be a number of disconnects on both sides.

  13. #13
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    I think Trump is a polarizing person period. Independet of politics.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesneakers View Post
    That's a good point. Sometimes I forgot how clueless I was the first time I voted. We're still only learning about ourselves.

    Don't be too sad because honestly, look at how easily marriages break up. Is it destroying the vows, or should they not have been made in the first place?
    To clarify, I would never have chosen to live my life with someone I knew held beliefs so very counter to my own.

    My supposition was that what if your life partner suddenly took a 180?

    Could you reconcile your partner's now VASTLY differently POV?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by EllieBee View Post
    To clarify, I would never have chosen to live my life with someone I knew held beliefs so very counter to my own.

    My supposition was that what if your life partner suddenly took a 180?

    Could you reconcile your partner's now VASTLY differently POV?
    Absolutely not. I have a long list of deal breakers.

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