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  1. #1
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    Why are the police so nervous?

    We see a lot of threads here about Police over reacting and shooting people during traffic stops, etc...why does that happen.

    Here are some examples that illustrate why they are nervous:




    Dashcam footage of Las Vegas police officer killing man who pulled gun during traffic stop
    “Every day that they don’t find something is good for me.“ Billie Dunn

  2. #2
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    another:
    last moments of an officers life:


    Body Cam of Officer Tyler Stewart Shot
    “Every day that they don’t find something is good for me.“ Billie Dunn

  3. #3
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    long video but so revealing:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ebTM...has_verified=1


    Published on Jan 4, 2014
    EL CAJON - August 21, 2011 - An El Cajon Police officer is shot right in front of a news camera. The entire incident is caught on camera including the shots being fired, officer being rescued, the immediate SWAT standoff, house fire, helicopter water drops and more, all in real time.


    The shooter shot his daughter (died) in the front seat of his truck then went into his home and shot his mother (died), then set the house on fire, and the POLICE OFFICER LIVED. It is incorrect that the officer shot himself the suspect shot him, the officer was not shot in the neck he was shot in the left temple, the bullet smacked into his skull sending fragments of his skull into his brain, which led to brain damage and brain bleeding, by myrical the bullet deflected off the skull span around the skull inbetween bone and skin then exited the other side of his head next to his ear. For more information type in the search box: Officers Jarred Slocum, Tim McFarland Speak About Shootout, El Cajon
    Last edited by katydid23; 08-03-2017 at 06:17 AM.
    “Every day that they don’t find something is good for me.“ Billie Dunn

  4. #4
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    another, very quick surprise:



    Body Cam #1 of 2 - Texas Fatal Police Shooting - Graphic
    MrMikesMondoVideo


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=taNx...has_verified=1
    “Every day that they don’t find something is good for me.“ Billie Dunn

  5. #5
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    May 2017:




    Bodycam Footage Shows Deputy Shooting Suspect Armed With Rifle

    Authorities released officer body camera footage on Wednesday of a suspect who was shot by a Douglas County sheriff’s deputy. Last Friday evening a Douglas County deputy saw what appeared to be a stranded motorist in a white GMC SUV near County Line Road and Santa Fe Drive. He got out of his cruiser to help. “As he approached the vehicle, the occupant of the vehicle got out of the vehicle with a rifle and confronted the deputy,” said Cmdr. Trent Cooper with the Littleton Police Department. Cooper says the weapon was a military style semi-automatic rifle. The deputy gave verbal commands to drop the weapon, which were ignored.

    Fearing for his life the officer fired, striking the suspect in the arm. “He was essentially attacked and felt his life was in danger and responded the way he was trained to do,” said Cooper. The suspect, identified as Deyon Marcus Rivas-Maestas, 26, remains hospitalized. According to Cooper, Rivas-Maestas faces assault charges once he is released. The Littleton Police Department and the 18th Judicial District’s Critical Incident Response Team are investigating the shooting. The deputy is on administrative leave during the investigation.
    “Every day that they don’t find something is good for me.“ Billie Dunn

  6. #6
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    I feel sorry that in this time the police feel like they have a bullseye on them.
    ~ shine on you crAzy diamond ~ Pink Floyd, Wish You Were Here

  7. #7
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    I'm going to say that the police are nervous because due to the insane gun culture in this country, everybody and their damn brother has a gun or 3 or 50. This also means that there are now so many guns in the US, both legal and illegal, pretty much anyone can get one and they are everywhere. So yeah, of course they are going to be nervous because guns are so prevalent there is WAY more of a chance a police officer is going to get shot while performing their duties.

    That being said, danger is part of being LE. I think this is something that you know going in when you take the job. I think police officers should make more money then they do, considering, and I would never want to work in LE, but again, this is what you face as an officer nowadays. Doesn't make it right, but it's the truth.
    "Do you hate America? What the h**l is wrong with you?" - The Mister

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by melissasmom View Post
    I'm going to say that the police are nervous because due to the insane gun culture in this country, everybody and their damn brother has a gun or 3 or 50. This also means that there are now so many guns in the US, both legal and illegal, pretty much anyone can get one and they are everywhere. So yeah, of course they are going to be nervous because guns are so prevalent there is WAY more of a chance a police officer is going to get shot while performing their duties.

    That being said, danger is part of being LE. I think this is something that you know going in when you take the job. I think police officers should make more money then they do, considering, and I would never want to work in LE, but again, this is what you face as an officer nowadays. Doesn't make it right, but it's the truth.
    I totally agree---danger is part of being in LE. It is something they knew when taking on the job.

    But what they don't always understand is how intense and debilitating that feeling of 'danger' can be over time and how it can affect everything in their lives---physical, emotional, psychological. And how can affect their reactions to daily interactions on the job.

    No one wants to get shot in the face. You and I don't assume that most of our customers or clients secretly want us DEAD. We don't go through the work day, imagining that the next customer we speak to is facing 20 yrs for a felony warrant, and they are desperate to escape our attention.

    That kind of stress, even when just sitting in the patrol car, or eating lunch, can slowly undermine one's health and stability.

    I know that the people who signed up for the job knew the potential dangers, but that doesn't mean it is not sometimes difficult to manage the effects of that stress.

    Seeing some of the deadly encounters helps illustrate the reality of that stress. It is a legitimate concern. Yet I see it said here, many times, that being a cop 'is not that dangerous.'
    “Every day that they don’t find something is good for me.“ Billie Dunn

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by katydid23 View Post
    I totally agree---danger is part of being in LE. It is something they knew when taking on the job.

    But what they don't always understand is how intense and debilitating that feeling of 'danger' can be over time and how it can affect everything in their lives---physical, emotional, psychological. And how can affect their reactions to daily interactions on the job.

    No one wants to get shot in the face. You and I don't assume that most of our customers or clients secretly want us DEAD. We don't go through the work day, imagining that the next customer we speak to is facing 20 yrs for a felony warrant, and they are desperate to escape our attention.

    That kind of stress, even when just sitting in the patrol car, or eating lunch, can slowly undermine one's health and stability.

    I know that the people who signed up for the job knew the potential dangers, but that doesn't mean it is not sometimes difficult to manage the effects of that stress.

    Seeing some of the deadly encounters helps illustrate the reality of that stress. It is a legitimate concern. Yet I see it said here, many times, that being a cop 'is not that dangerous.'
    OK, so being a cop is too dangerous of a job for a regular human being. What is the solution katy?

    RoboCops?
    "Sell your cleverness and buy bewilderment" - Rumi

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoolJ View Post
    OK, so being a cop is too dangerous of a job for a regular human being. What is the solution katy?

    RoboCops?
    Gotta fix a lot of stuff:
    Poverty, racism, gun culture, renegade cops, cops who lie and cover for each other community oversight of police brutality and shootings, drugs, police training, hiring practice, review boards...

    Campaign Zero solutions:
    https://www.joincampaignzero.org/solutions/

    Letting cops do and get away with whatever they want is not the answer.
    Last edited by bluesneakers; 08-03-2017 at 02:33 PM.
    Toxic masculinity ruins the party again!


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesneakers View Post
    Gotta fix a lot of stuff:
    Poverty, racism, gun culture, renegade cops, cops who lie and cover for each other community oversight of police brutality and shootings, drugs, police training, hiring practice, review boards...

    Campaign Zero solutions:
    https://www.joincampaignzero.org/solutions/

    Letting cops do and get away with whatever they want is not the answer.
    I think that police need to work shorter shifts with destressing time between. Four hours on, two hours off for Destressing with exercise and talk therapy. And then four hours on and another two off for de stressing .

    No one can do a job where there is constant tension. Police have high rates of alcoholism and health issues.

    It is going to cost more to have police, but i bet people are not signing up,for the job.

    There is a teacher shortage because of the ridiculous working conditions. There will be a police shortage as well.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by human View Post
    I think that police need to work shorter shifts with destressing time between. Four hours on, two hours off for Destressing with exercise and talk therapy. And then four hours on and another two off for de stressing .

    No one can do a job where there is constant tension. Police have high rates of alcoholism and health issues.

    It is going to cost more to have police, but i bet people are not signing up,for the job.

    There is a teacher shortage because of the ridiculous working conditions. There will be a police shortage as well.
    Probably less expensive than what it costs to settle with victims or their families.
    Toxic masculinity ruins the party again!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesneakers View Post
    Probably less expensive than what it costs to settle with victims or their families.
    Excellent point!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesneakers View Post
    Gotta fix a lot of stuff:
    Poverty, racism, gun culture, renegade cops, cops who lie and cover for each other community oversight of police brutality and shootings, drugs, police training, hiring practice, review boards...

    Campaign Zero solutions:
    https://www.joincampaignzero.org/solutions/

    Letting cops do and get away with whatever they want is not the answer.
    Another huge answer is to handle adverse childhood experiences, There are many people working on this. Doctors, social workers, psychologists.

    The recognition that adverse things such as abuse, poverty, racism, domestic violence, death of a parent and other things affect people's behavior is the first step. Instead of punishing children in school, using different approaches will help the self healing of the child. Children act out and instead of being punished, they can learn coping skills. There are so many wonderful ideas being used.

    If people were not holding in rage and crushing fears and sadness, we would not see the crime nor the need for so many people to,have guns.

    Training police in de escalation and the community policing establishing relationships is huge.

    However, it is not like the olden days in the neighborhoods, People don't really know their neighbors either.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by human View Post
    Another huge answer is to handle adverse childhood experiences, There are many people working on this. Doctors, social workers, psychologists.

    The recognition that adverse things such as abuse, poverty, racism, domestic violence, death of a parent and other things affect people's behavior is the first step. Instead of punishing children in school, using different approaches will help the self healing of the child. Children act out and instead of being punished, they can learn coping skills. There are so many wonderful ideas being used.

    If people were not holding in rage and crushing fears and sadness, we would not see the crime nor the need for so many people to,have guns.

    Training police in de escalation and the community policing establishing relationships is huge.

    However, it is not like the olden days in the neighborhoods, People don't really know their neighbors either.

    All discussions germane to this issue.

    Problem is, since the 1980's, mental health care is this country had been swept to the margins. Funding cuts hurt those in serious need of care, and the situation has only become more virulent.


    Couple that with ill-trained, ill-suited LEO with a nervous sensibilty. And you've got Barney Fife meets Apocalypse Now.

    I am not an LEO. I never served in the military.

    Know why? Because I am not SUITED for stressful tactical/training situations. So it is not the job for me. I know my limits.


    If you are too skittish to do your job-- there are plenty others. I hear cons all the time saying that nobody "owes" you a job. You can't handle what the job entails? Then move on.

    So why would it be any different for cops? Yet, somehow it is, and nobody has ever explained to me why.
    "When people learn no tools of judgment and merely follow their hopes, the seeds of political manipulation are sown." -Stephen Jay Gould


    July 4, 1776-January 20, 2017
    RIP

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